Applied Studies in Agribusiness and Commerce (APSTRACT) publishes high quality contributions on topics related to Agribusiness and Commerce and provides managers, researchers and teachers with a forum, where they can publish and acquire research results, case studies and reviews, which are important to the global food chain. The APSTRACT is an Open Access (OA) Journal. Submitted manuscripts should have a relationship to the economics of agriculture, natural resources, environment, or rural development.

Papers should have a practical orientation and demonstrate innovation in analysis, methods, or application. Topic areas include production economics and farm management, agricultural policy, agricultural environmental issues, tourism, regional planning and rural development, methodology, marketing of agricultural and food products, international trade and development, sport management.

Research on a significant economic component, analyses of problems connected to research, extension, and teaching of the International MBA Network in Agribusiness and Commerce are also encouraged.

Applied Studies in Agribusiness and Commerce (APSTRACT): An internationally recognised journal of business and commerce ISSN : 1789-221X, electronic version: ISSN 1789-7874 have been listed on the IDEAS/RePEc.

All of our articles and Issues are available in the following repositories: AgEcon Search and University of Debrecen Electronic ArchiveOur Journal DOI name is: 10.19041/APSTRACT

Journal Policies

Applied Studies in Agribusiness and Commerce (APSTRACT) is the official periodical of the International MBA Network in Agribusiness and Commerce published to promote the discussion and dissemination of applied research in applied economics, agribusiness and commerce carried out within the International MBA Network.

These instructions detail policies and procedures for publishing in the APSTRACT Journal. We recommend that authors refer to these instructions, as well as the Instructions to Authors: Style and Formduring submission, peer review, acceptance, proof correction, and final publication phases.

The journal publishes on its website the Annual Report of the International MBA Network in Agribusiness and Commerce, thus enabling members to have immediate access to the papers. Reactions to articles previously published in APSTRACT should be sent to the Editor.

Authors are responsible for reading their manuscripts and hereby affirm that the content of their manuscripts (data including graphs, figures, tables, and illustrations) has not appeared in print elsewhere (except as abstracts, local or regional field day reports, extension letters, or non-peer-reviewed proceedings of conferences). Authors are aware that if the content detailed above has been published elsewhere, our Journal cannot accept it.

To avoid plagiarism, after the manuscript arrives at the editor’s office, it will be checked by an international plagiarism search software programme. If the similarity index is too high the manuscript will be immediately refused.

All new submissions are screened for completeness and adherence to the Guide for Authors. uthors of manuscripts rejected at initial evaluation stage will normally be informed within 1-2 week of receipt. Typically the manuscript will be reviewed within 80 days. Reviewers or Editors may request more than one revision cound of a manuscript, and alternative reviewers may also be invited to review the manuscript at any time. After acceptance, it currently takes 1 week to get a citable, uncorrected draft of the article online, another 4-5 weeks to get the final corrected article online, and a few weeks later this is compiled into an online and offline volume and issue. The print copy follows 2-3 weeks later.

Vol. 17 No. 2 (2023): APSTRACT Current Issue

Published December 30, 2023

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Articles

  • THE PLACE OF AMORTIZATION AMONG COSTS, AS WELL AS EFFECT OF DIFFERENT DEPRECATION CALCULATION METHODS ON MANAGEMENT FROM BUSINESS ECONOMIC AND FINANCIAL VIEW OF POINT.
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    53

    In our article, we try to present the place of amortization (depreciation) among costs, based on several aspects. After that, we will present the different description methods based on their characteristics, giving priority to what their use means for the entrepreneur. We support this with the help of model calculations. We present what mean the amortization accounting methods assuming that management is without inflation or between inflationary conditions. Based on this, we try to formulate proposals on how state intervention how could help businesses in inflationary economic conditions beyond that it would be more permissive in the choice of description method. Following the business economics approach to the question, we will examine the effect of amortization on tax base and the income, taking into consideration financial and accounting aspects. Considering that the use of the fixed assets and thus the expected return period takes several years, we must attention to the careful planning of the amount of replacement costs. When determining the required capital value, we cannot ignore the time factor, the time value of money. The required value of capital accumulation supplementing amortization per period is determined using the annuity method.

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  • THE PROFIT EFFICIENCY OF MORINGA OLEIFERA PRODUCTION IN OSUN STATE, NIGERIA
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    58

    This study examined the profit efficiency of Moringa oleifera production by farmers in Osun State, Nigeria. Primary data were obtained from 150 respondents. Multistage sampling procedure was used for selecting respondents. The data were analyzed with the aid of descriptive statistics, budgetary analysis and stochastic frontier production function. The findings revealed that male predominate moringa enterprise with about 55.3% male, most producers fall between the age bracket 41-50years with a mean age of 44.92 (± 13.168) years and the average farm size is 0.3 hectares whilst indicating that most producers had less than 0.1 hectares of land. Moringa production had a benefit cost ratio of ₦5.852, profit margin of ₦0.182, expense structure ratio of ₦0.107, net return on investment ₦4.857, rate of return of ₦5.482 and profitability ratio of ₦0.981. The average profit efficiency of moringa producers was 18.73% on the profit frontier.  Family labour, hired labour and transport cost were significant and had positive coefficient while the seed cost, pesticide cost, level of education and farm size are also significant but bears negative coefficient. The level of education and farm size are amongst the inefficiency variables considered. This study concludes that Moringa oleifera production is highly profitable but producers have not been able to maximize profit efficiency. It therefore recommends that producers improve on adding value to moringa products and extend their channels of distribution considering the cost incurred on transportation.

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  • MARKET CONCENTRATION AND DEMAND FOR ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES IN MAJOR MOTOR PARKS WITHIN IBADAN METROPOLIS, OYO STATE, NIGERIA
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    51

    The value addition to alcoholic beverages through packaging in small nylon and increase in the introduction of new brands has led to its high demand and many Nigerians earning their means of livelihood through the sales. The study showed that the average consumption per day was 6.1 sachets per week. The study revealed that 28.6% of the consumers’ monthly income was spent on alcoholic beverages per month. Seaman brand had the highest market share (73.4%); this was followed by Chelsea (66.2%). The study affirmed that 62.9% of the consumers based their choice on high alcoholic content while 3.1% claimed the choice was based on the medicinal (cures pile) value. Also, Captain Jack had the highest market concentration (0.35). The age of respondents, marital status, household size, and the quantity consumed per week were the factors that influenced consumers’ monthly expenditure on alcoholic beverages. It is recommended that efforts should be made by the government to reduce the rate of consumption of alcoholic beverages at the motor parks by enforcing the existing (FRSC Act cap 141 Laws of the Federation of Nigeria) law banning/regulating the sales or increasing tax on the brands to make it out of reach for most consumers. 

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  • HOUSEHOLDS’ FOOD CONSUMPTION BEHAVIOUR DURING COVID-19 PANDEMIC: EVIDENCE FROM RURAL HOUSEHOLDS IN SOUTH AFRICA
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    39

    The food consumption behaviour of households has been affected by the lockdown restrictions that were implemented to reduce the COVID-19 infection rate. This study was aimed at analysing the food consumption behaviour of rural households during the COVID-19 pandemic in South Africa. To achieve this, a simple random technique was used to collect data from 120 in Merry Pebble (MP) Stream Village. Thereafter, an Ordered Probit Model was used to examine the extent to which households have increased, decreased or maintained the same quantity of food consumed during COVID-19. The results indicated that 46.7% of the rural households had consumed less food during COVID-19 pandemic, 32.5% consumed about the same amount of food, and 20.8% consumed more food. The variables that contributed towards a decrease in food consumption are employment status, household size, loss of income, and social relief grants. On the contrary, bulk buying and food parcels had stabilised food consumption, while the number of employed people in a household and food bought from restaurants contributed towards an increase in food consumption during COVID-19 pandemic. With regard to consumption behaviour per food item, fresh produce, meat, snacks and fast food were consumed less during COVID-19, while there was a constant consumption in dairy products, and an increase in consumption of canned food, frozen food, prepared food, grains and water. The study recommends that the government should continue with the economic and social relief programmes that were created during COVID-19, as they play an important role in increasing and stabilising food consumption by rural households.

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  • EXAMINATION OF NARCISSISTIC AND MACHIAVELLIAN CHARACTER TRAITS IN LEADERS
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    57

    The leader is a person of essential importance in the life of an organization. Someone who can keep things in order. All of this is a very diverse task that requires countless skills, which affects the organizational culture, the success of the company, the satisfaction and efficiency of the employees. The objective of my research is to examine whether narcissistic and Machiavellian traits appear in individuals with leadership experience, and how they feel about the issue of empowerment and certain assertive situations. The sample of my research was 102 leaders. I made sure that there is a correlation between the mentioned variables.

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  • WHAT KINDS OF COMPETENCES DO WE REQUIRE AT THE EMPLOYMENT MARKET? JOB ADVERTISEMENTS REVIEW BASED ON COLLECTED DATA FROM WORKLINE.HU JOB-SEEKING SITE
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    37

    The epidemic of coronavirus induced radical changes on the employment market as well, hence we may reasonably ask what (new) competences do we have to own to become successful in seeking jobs. The goal of this research is to shed light on the employment market’s new competence demands by analysing job offers found on the website workline.hu. Execution of the investigation took place during the Spring of 2022, during which 410 job vacancies were examined. By utilizing the method of content-analysis, the most important competences were defined first, and then, using KSH’s employment rate statistics, crosstab analysis have revelaed the developments of the most paramount key competences, specializations, competence expectations and connections between the regions. Ultimately, I have determined the foreign language knowledge demanded by employers, and other requirements displayed in the advertisements. Based on the results, the most important key competences include precision, independent working skills and excellent communication skills, which fulfilled a major role in sortments both by regions or national economy sectors. Furthermore, the higher skill demands of inviting applications originated from Transdanubial regions were also corroborated. Beyond said competences, however, numerous other factors (consisting but not limited to: computer science knowledge, B-category driver’s license) may also play a significant role during selection of employees. That being said, the examination did not confirm bigger successfulness rate amongst people with foreign language knowledge. Further investigation of the study includes compare and contrast or results with the competence demands found on other job advertisement portals.

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  • HEDONIC PRICE OF FREE-RANGE EGGS IN COSTA RICA
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    69

    Eggs are a highly consumed animal product in Costa Rica. It is grown in different production systems and differentiation attributes, although there is little information about consumption and consumer preferences for grazing production. This study aimed to determine the effect of free-grazing on the price per kilogram of eggs paid by the consumer in Costa Rica. The results show a positive effect of 19.77% on price of eggs produced in free-grazing systems, but preference for other attributes such as nutritional fortification, egg size and brand names were also determined. Incorporating free-range technologies to replace caged poultry production can contribute to animal welfare and balance with nature, and producers can opt for differentiated prices in local markets.

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  • ASSESSMENT OF THE CONDITIONS OF THE FARMING HOUSEHOLDS IN NORTH COTABATO: Using Comparative Analysis
    Views:
    102

    This study was conducted to assess the conditions of the farming households in North Cotabato as basis to reform the development of agri-preneurs in line with the country’s thrust of transforming farmers as entrepreneurs. The research analyzed the conditions of the farming households in North Cotabato in relation to the crops they produce. Stratified random sampling was employed in the collection of data from four hundred (400) farming households using a self-constructed questionnaire validated by the panel. Data generated were analyzed descriptively and by inferential statistics using analysis of Variance (ANOVA). The research revealed that the primary commodity produced is rice, followed by rubber and coconut. On the other hand, study revealed that respondents in the study are engaged in single farming, without Farming, and multiple farming.

    Among the perceived conditions of the farming households the study also revealed that conditions in terms of infrastructure facility, market information, managerial skills and entrepreneurial competencies are ready and available for the farmers but neither agree nor disagree on the availability of the conditions in terms of market opportunity, access to credit facility, enabling environment, and government policies on entrepreneurial development. The result affirmed the hypotheses that significant differences in the conditions of the farming household when analyzed according to the crops produced.

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  • THE EFFECT OF FARMER BUSINESS SCHOOL ON HOUSEHOLD WELFARE: EVIDENCE FROM COCOA FARMERS IN ATWIMA NWABIAGYA NORTH DISTRICT, GHANA
    Views:
    48

    Farmer Business School (FBS) is an educational programme aimed at improving the knowledge and skills of farmers in various aspects of agriculture, including financial management and marketing. The purpose of the paper is to examine the effect of FBS on household welfare among cocoa producers in the Atwima Nwabiagya North District of Ghana.  Data was collected from a sample of 330 cocoa farmers, 200 of which participated in the FBS programme and 103 who did not. The study employed a range of statistical techniques to investigate the effect of FBS on cocoa growers, thus, independent samples t-test, binary probit model, Kendall's Coefficient of Concordance and perception index. The results of the study suggest that involvement in the FBS programme has a positive significant influence on household welfare. Cocoa farmers who participated in the programme experienced a significant increase in income and yield, as well as improved overall well-being against those who didn't take part. The research's findings offer evidence that FBS programmes can play a vital role in enhancing the welfare of farmers, particularly in developing nations where agricultural livelihoods play a crucial role in economic growth and poverty reduction. The study highlights the importance of investing in education and training programmes for farmers to improve their skills, knowledge, and overall well-being.

     

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  • TREND ANALYSIS OF UGANDA’S COFFEE SECTOR
    Views:
    148

    Coffee (Coffea arabica and C. canephora) is an important commercial crop globally, and the second most traded global commodity by developing nations after oil. Uganda is among the top 10 coffee exporters worldwide, and second in Africa. The total export amounted to 301,366 tons of “green” coffee in 2021, forming the second-largest commodity export, and contributing about 12.4% to Uganda’s total formal exports. However, the country’s overall performance over time remains unclear given the fluctuations in production and export prices.   This study aimed to evaluate the production and export trends of Uganda’s coffee sector by: (i) defining the overall direction of coffee production and export value, (ii) assessing the market variability, and (iii) evaluating the global cross-cutting issues regarding coffee production and export. Data was extracted from FAOSTAT and Uganda Coffee Development Authority (UCDA) databases. Trends were analysed using the Mann-Kendall and Sen’s Slope test, while market variability was analyzed using the fixed base index (FBI) and coefficient of variation. VOSviewer software was used to analyze literature from the Web of Science database to highlight cross-cutting issues. Results indicated a significant positive increase in coffee production and export value (p = 0.0001, Slope = 1736.67 tons and p = 0.001, Slope = 4.44 million USD) respectively. Among the top ten coffee producers, Uganda presented the third worst unstable coffee export value with a 20.1% coefficient of variation. Fairtrade, climate change, and certification were the most outstanding global cross-cutting issues. Market stabilization mechanisms should be developed through value addition by establishing coffee processing and roasting plants, as well as strategic governance and policy support to counter emerging global challenges such as climate change.

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  • EXPLORING THE NEXUS BETWEEN SUSTAINABLE CONSUMPTION BEHAVIOR AND ORGANIC FOOD PURCHASE: A Comprehensive Review
    Views:
    96

    Recently, a remarkable increase in organic food consumption can been seen in both developed and developing countries. This research aims to identify the role of sustainable consumption behavior in purchasing organic food. The research problem has been formulated with several questions, most notably:  Does sustainable consumption behavior has a role in purchasing organic food? The relationship between sustainable consumption behavior and organic food has received a lot of attention in the literature. However, take a comprehensive approach to examine how sustainable consumption behavior might affect purchasing organic food? In order to examine the role of sustainable consumption behavior in buying organic food, this article proposes a framework that adopts a comprehensive approach. The author conducted a qualitative synthesis of the literature (Systematic Literature Review (PRISMA), including 43 articles, revealing several findings. One of them, is that sustainable consumption behavior positively and directly impacts buying organic food due to the health, environmental cognition, high quality, trust, and food safety. The second finding is that complex factors influence organic food buying behavior. For example, price is always likely to be an important factor for most customers. Moreover, the lack of knowledge about organic food is another factor affecting customers’ buying organic food.

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  • IMPACT OF CLIMATE CHANGE ON PEOPLES’ LIVELIHOOD AND LIVESTOCK PRODUCTION IN UGANDA
    Views:
    50

    Livestock sector in Uganda contributes significantly towards individual household income and food security and even though peoples’ dependance on livestock production for survival in Uganda is a reality, it’s also undeniable that livestock, which provides food and revenue on a worldwide scale, would be vulnerable to the direct or indirect consequences of climate change. Agriculture contributed 24.1% of the Uganda’s GDP in the financial year (FY) 2021–2022 and according to the Uganda bureau of standards (UBOS), agriculture employs over 70% of Uganda's working population. The purpose of this present study was to to evaluate the impact of climate change on peoples’ livelihood and livestock production in Uganda. Bibliometric analysis was the quantitative technique used for reviewing and describing published publications that assisted in evaluating academic works from secondary data obtained on digital databases in the context of this study. The VOS viewer software was used as a tool to perform the co-occurrence analysis, and then to realize the visualization of the impact of climate change on peoples’ livelihood and livestock production in Uganda using articles analysed on platform research with associated references from the Web of Science database. The visualisation highlighted topical areas that reflect the impacts of climate on peoples’ livelihood and livestock such as diseases, drought, coping strategies, greenhouse gases, drought, vulnerability, dry lands, mobility among pastoral communities, low productivity, reduced forage resources, elevated temperature extra all of which negatively affects the economic levels of individuals and the national income from livestock either directly or directly. Conclusively, interventions that are aimed at improving climate smartness in Uganda’s livestock farming communities may have significant food security and income benefits for different livelihoods.

     

    Keywords: climate, livestock animals, livelihood, income

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