Vol. 7 No. 4-5 (2013)
Articles

Bioenergy: Risks to food-, energy- and environmental security

Published December 30, 2013
József Popp
University of Debrecen Centre for Agricultural and Applied Economic Sciences Faculty of Applied Economics and Rural Development, Institute of Economic Theory, Department of Economic Policies
Mónika Harangi-Rákos
University of Debrecen Centre for Agricultural and Applied Economic Sciences Faculty of Applied Economics and Rural Development, Institute of Economic Theory, Department of Economic Policies
Károly Pető
University of Debrecen Centre for Agricultural and Applied Economic Sciences Faculty of Applied Economics and Rural Development, Institute of Rural Development and Functional Economics
Adrian Nagy
University of Debrecen Centre for Agricultural and Applied Economic Sciences Faculty of Applied Economics and Rural Development, Institute of Business Economics
pdf

APA

Popp, J. ., Harangi-Rákos, M. ., Pető, K. ., & Nagy, . A. . (2013). Bioenergy: Risks to food-, energy- and environmental security. Applied Studies in Agribusiness and Commerce, 7(4-5), 121-130. https://doi.org/10.19041/APSTRACT/2013/4-5/17

There are growing opportunities and demands for the use of biomass to provide additional renewables, energy for heat, power and fuel, pharmaceuticals and green chemical feedstocks. However, the worldwide potential of bioenergy is limited, because all land is multifunctional, and land is also needed for food, feed, timber and fiber production, and for nature conservation and climate protection. The recent expansion of the bioenergy industries together with a strong increase in many commodity prices has raised concerns over the land use choices between energy needs and food and feed. New systems of energy production must be developed based on cost of environmental damage due to production and use of fossil energy and certain chemicals and materials. This article presents risks to food and energy security, estimates of bioenergy potential and the challenges of the environmental and social impact associated with expansions in bioenergy production.