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Comparison of flower bud development in almond, apricot and peach genotypes
Published April 19, 2006
93-98.

The phenological processes of flower bud development of stone fruits during dormancy are not thoroughly known. The yield of these species, especially of almond, apricot and peach is determined basically by dormancy of flower buds, the survival rate of buds during winter frosts and by their ability to develop normal floral organs in the next spr...ing. After the initiation of floral primordia, flower bud development is taking place in continuous space until blooming, though at different speed characteristic to the species. To study flower bud development during dormancy we applied two alternative methods in different genotypes of almond, apricot and peach: (1) examination of pollen development (microsporogenesis), and (2) the measurement of pistil length. The samples were collected from the central part of Hungary during the dormancy period of 2004/2005. The three fruit species differed significantly in the speed of flower bud development, it was the quickest in almond, followed by apricot and peach. In addition to the species, there were significant differences in the process of microsporogenesis and pistil development between genotypes within species and also between the different types of shoots on which the buds were located. On short shoots buds developed at a higher speed, than on long shoots. Based on our observations, on the short shoots the period of endodormancy was shorter with 5-30 days, according to genotypes, compared to the long shoots. This difference, however, decreased to 2-3 days by the time of blooming.

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Sex expression of flowers in cultivated sweet and sour cherries
Published February 23, 2000
50-52.

During the period of 1968-1972 nine sweet cherry varieties were investigated by the author on mazzard seedling rootstock, more­over cv. Germersdorfi óriás and cv. Münchebergi korai sweet cherry cultivars grafted on mahaleb, cv. Korponai and cv. Sukorói cherries were observed on rootstocks of cv. Cig...nymeggy sour cherry seedling, too.

Yet, there are other relations between the different parts of sweet cherry flowers too, which perhaps indicate the effect of rootstocks in Cerasus scions. The flower structure shows feminine character on mahaleb, the effect is intermediate on mazzard, however, the sour cherry rootstock strengthens the male character.

Four sour cherry varieties as cv. Cigánymeggy C. 404. cv. Érdi nagygyümölcsű, cv. Meteor korai and cv. Pándy C. 101 were studied on three rootstocks: mazzard, mahaleb and Cigánymeggy C. 215 seedling rootstocks between 1976 and 1980.

The pistil length, stamen number and relative stamen number diverged significantly on different rootstocks. The results revealed a close negative correlation between the pistil length and stamen number, furthermore noticing that, in the self-fertile cv. Meteor korai and cv. Újfehértói fürtös presented increasing of the relative stamen number, so the fertility decreased, while in the case of self-sterile varieties the change was favourable.

Summing up the results, it is obvious, that the fertility of flowers can be modified by rootstocks and the ecological factors cause sex reversions on different combinations.

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Comparative study of different fertile groups in plums
Published June 20, 2006
71-76.

The plum traditional fruit species in Hungary, several local cultivars was born in the different grower's districts. The author that investigated, that are morphological differences between an odds find self-fertile, self sterile (with functional stamens) and male sterile plum cultivars. For it thought about main questions of a scientific debat...e sown up and the study this way gave reactions totalize. There were in three fertile groups 8-8 type of feature plum cultivars in periods of 1992-2001, respectively 1993-1999. It was founded by author big odds found the troops on the basis of 9 traits between. Pistil length of self sterile cultivars very typical, such as sesquipedalian flower peduncle of the self-fertile plums and the hypoandry of male sterile cultivars. The relative stamen number and the pollen viability as well significant odds gave.

The average fruit mass and sharka infection of self-fertile plums this troops extreme work. According to cultivar's averages the shark symptoms standard the right correlation the singular traits, but those one part of her with each other not shown connection.

The annuity potencies underdeveloped the troops behind and the troops within cultivar's differences had case significance. The results usable the male sterile cultivars and progeny further its investments.

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Effects of different pollination treatments in genotypes of Prunus salicina Lindl.
Published April 19, 2006
141-146.

The low productivity in the Japanese plum (Prunus salicina Lindl) is related with self-incompatibility characteristics, so other species or varieties that act as pollinators need to be present to improve fruit production. The objective of this work was to study the efficiency of pollination in different genotypes of P. salicina ...m>using treatments of natural self-pollination, cross-pollination with P. armeniaca cv. Giada and open pollination. These treatments were evaluated through viability techniques and in vitro and in vivo germination of pollen grains; the growth of pollen tubes along the pistil was also observed. Genotypes used in this study showed differences for each one of the pollination treatments. Some genotypes showed signs of self-sterility and interincompatibility with P. armeniaca cv. Giada, while others showed partial self-fertility characteristics or pseudocompatibility. Moreover, some genotypes showed a higher affinity coefficient with cv. Giada and these will be indicating a possible intercompatibility. These studies will be an important contribution breeding and selection of intra and intercompatible genotypes to be used in commercial orchards.

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Review of the molecular background of self-incompatibility in rosaceous fruit trees
Published April 19, 2006
7-18.

This review gives a presentation of the gametophytic self-incompatibility system in the roscaeous fruit trees. Studies to discover the pistil (S-ribonucleases) and pollen-part components (F-box molecules) are summarized and models for the self-incompatibility reactions as well as their molecular background are discussed. We describe how mutatio...ns within the S-RNase or F-box genes can contribute to the transition from self-incompatibility to the self-compatible phenotype in many fruit tree crops. The current state of the arts is compared to the information obtained in other plant species possessing similar incompatibility system.

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Long term investigations of flowers and leaves on mainly non-domestica plums
Published March 14, 2005
73-79.

The author dealt with plum species representing different eco-geographic areas by their genetic adaptation and their hybrids, as European (P. domestica, P. italica, P. cerasifera), Asian (P. salicina, P. simonii, P. ussuriensis), American (P. ame...ricana, P. besseyi, P. munsoniana, P. tomentosa). The rootstocks of the trees examined were seedlings of C. 679 myrobalan with the exception of Laroda and Santa Rosa II, which were grown on three different stocks: seedlings of C. 174 myrobalan, C. 449 bitter almond and C. 471 sweet almond. The size of peduncle, length of pistil, stamen number per flower, relative stamen number (SN/PL) have been suitable for description and distinction of varieties. Similarly shape of leaves, length of petiole, length and width of blade helped the identification.

The ratio of the dimensions of leaves, length of petiole and of leaf blade, also contributed to the distinction of European, Asian and American plum species, notwithstanding their relations with ecological conditions as well as historical, technical properties, pomological features, etc. Computed indicators (relative stamen number and shape-index of leaves) also have been useful data.

Significant correlations have been found between colour of nectaries and mean values of variety-groups. The potential values of non-European varieties for purposes of commercial production could be forecasted from the point of view of quality, ecological, pomological as well as market value. It is important, however, to know the effect of the rootstock and growing site as well as their interaction, on the one hand, whereas the resistance or tolerance of the varieties as limiting factors, at least to the sharka (Plum pox) virus, Xanthomonas pruni, on the other hand (cf. Surányi & Erdős, 2004a and 2004b).

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Flavonoids, chalcones and phenyl-propanoids in apple and pear flowers
Published May 10, 2004
35-38.

The presence of phloretin-glycosides in the hypanthium and pistil of apple and pear flowers can be verified. Thin layer chromatography is a reliable method for detecting phloretin, gained by acidic hydrolysis. The dominance of phloretin was equally characteristic for flowers in apple (`Sampion', 'Freedom') and pear (Tem-re Bosc', 'Co...nference') cultivars treated with various bioregulators (Biomit, Bion 50WG, Regalis), no significant difference could be found visually as compared to control samples. Chlorogenic acid and caffeic acid was detected in all apple and pear samples, rutin was present only in pear, and hyperoside was found only in a few apple samples.

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Recent findings of the tree fruit self-incompatibility studies
Published May 15, 2007
7-15.

This review endeavours to collect all recent and substantial contributions to the quickly deepening fields of tree fruit self-incompatibility studies and hence updating previously published reviews. Studies carried out to discover the molecular basis of gametophytic self-incompatibility are summarized and a newly described model for the solanac...eous plants is also outlined. We describe recent findings in all economically important fruit tree crops involving apple, European pear, sweet and sour cherries, almond, Japanese plum, sloe, Japanese apricot, European apricot and peach. Additional DNA sequences are now available for both the pistil and pollen component genes in several species and their molecular, evolutionary or economic implications are discussed in the light of the fruit setting behaviour.

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