Vol 5, No 1-2 (1999)

Published May 24, 1999

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Articles

Time of flowering and fertilisation of quince varieties
9-15.

Literature dealing with flowering and fertilisation of quince is scarce. Most controversial and scanty are informations on observations of self- and cross-pollination. According to our observations, differences in blooming time are few (2-3) days only, thus flowering of most varieties is synchronous. The varieties observed are grouped as early,... intermediate and late flowering ones. Self fertility of the individual varieties, however, was not assessed unequivocally, therefore it is recommended, by safety reasons, to consider quince actually as a whole to be auto-incompatible. Artificial self-pollination (or rather geitonogamy) as well as cross pollination with other varieties increased substantially fruit set if compared with the results of natural self-pollination (autogamy). According to the fruit set of their open pollinated flowers, varieties have been classified according to fertility as low (below 10 %), medium (between 10 and 20 %) and high (more than 20 %). Cross fertility of varieties is highly variable depending on combination and on season. Contradictory data are probably due to the sensitivity of quince to conditions of search. Better fruit set was coincident with higher number of stout seeds per fruit. Well developed seeds are definitely a prerequisite of larger fruit size.

 

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Blooming time of some apricot varieties of different origin in Hungary
16-20.

There are a number of self-incompatible and partially self-compatible apricot varieties which need cross pollination for suitable yield. We have to know their blooming time to select the appropriate pollen donor cultivars. The blooming period of 20 apricot varieties was observed in four subsequent years. Blooming time was affected by temperatur...e conditions very much. Varieties studied were assigned to three groups according to their blooming time. The rate of overlapping of important variety combinations was observed. Sufficient overlapping of blooming period for safe pollination is usually ensured within the same group of varieties or between varieties of the neighbouring blooming time groups.

 

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Association of European plum varieties in the orchards
21-24.

The flowering phenology, blooming time and inter-fertility relations of 63 European plum varieties has been studied at growing sites with different ecological conditions during a 10 year long period. The purpose was to develop a system of variety combinations which approaches an optimum in fertility as long as inter-fertility relations will cea...se to be a limiting factor of yield. According to their blooming time, varieties are assigned to 5 groups: very early, early, medium, late and very late. As for their fertility relations, four groups are formed: self-sterile (0%), partially self-fertile (0.1 to 10 %), self-fertile (10.1 to 20 %) and highly self-fertile (more than 20 % fruit set with self pollination). The four categories of fruit set at free pollination are also relevant to the grower: low (less than 10 %), medium (10 to 20 %), high (20 to 40 %) and very high (more than 40 % fruit set).

By artificial cross pollination, one combination Cacanska najbolja x Stanley proved to be mutually inter-incompatible. Blocks planted to a single self-sterile variety flanking a pollinizer variety proved the spacial distribution of the pollen. The reduction in fruit set was already apparent in the second row away from the pollinizer trees. In a large plantation, without bee hives, relatively low yield was stated on self-sterile trees even close to the pollinizer.

In the case of self-sterile and partially self-fertile varieties, a combination of three varieties is recommended. The blooming period of the pollinizer variety should overlap the period of the self-sterile variety at least by 70 %, and the distance should not exceed 15 to 20 meters. Association of self-fertile varieties may also enhance the productivity of the trees. In that case an overlap of 50 % in blooming time and a maximum distance between the varieties of 30 to 40 meters will be sufficient.

 

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Chemical analysis of the pollen of plum varieties
25-26.

The chemical composition, amino acids and carbohydrates, of the pollen has been analysed in varieties grown in Hungary during the years 1993 at Kecskemet and 1995 at Cegléd and Pomáz. The distinction of 17 amino acids and 7 carbohydrates has been achieved. The aim of the study was to find criteria for the distinction of varieties.

The... total content of amino acids varied between 15.53 and 20.54 %. The highest ratios represented the asparagine and the glutamine acids. The relative content in other amino acids was between 2 and 7 % of the total. The less frequent were cysteine and valine.

 

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Anatomical study of the bud union in „Chip" and „T" budded 'Jonagold' apple trees on MM 106 rootstock
27-29.

The traditional methods for vegetative propagation of apple and its varieties are the T-budding, and the winter grafting, but this latter way is a difficult and expensive procedure.

In our experiment carried out in the Fruit Tree Nursery Soroksár, the healing process of chip- and T-budded apple trees 'Jonagold' on MM 106 rootstock was ...studied.

The budding (T- and Chip-) was made in the first week of August, samples for microscope examination were taken monthly after this time until leaf fall.

The investigated part of plants was made soft with 48 % HF (hydrogenfluoride), then cross and longitudinal section were made and examined by microscope.

Based on analysis of microscope pictures in case of Chip-budding, it was established, that development had started quickly after budding on the rootstock and scion too. But the callus originated almost entirely from the rootstock tissue as new parenchyma cells fills the gap between the two components of graft (scion and stock), becoming interlocked and allowing for some passage of water and nutrients between the stock and the scion. This quantity of callus in case of T budding was under the scion buds larger, than the Chip-budded unions, where the thickness of callus mass is uniformly thick round the chip. The large mass of callus pushes the scion bud outwards from the shoot axis, which later results in a larger shoot-curvature above the bud union.

Following this process on the Chip-budding it can be observed also, that a continuity of the cambium is established between bud and rootstock. Then the newly formed cambium started typical cambial activity, forming new xylem and phloem.

Later the callus begins to lignify, and it is completed within about 3 months after budding.

 

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Grape rootstock - scion interactions on shoot growth and cane maturing
30-34.

Interaction between the rootstock and scion varieties (clones) was examined. Berlandieri x Riparia T. K. 5BB, Berlandieri x Riparia T.5C being the most widely used varieties in Hungary, Fercal, Ruggeri 140 being recently used on special soil conditions ; Georgikon 28 a new established variety and Berlandieri x Riparia T. 8B GK 10 clone were the... rootstocks used. The V. vinifera L. varieties were a clone of Italian Riesling and two new hybrids from the same cross population f ( Noble Italian Riesling X Ezerjó) X ( Noble Italian Riesling X Pinot Gris ) }. This study presents the results how the growth habit depends on different scion/stock combinations in the first three years.

Shoot growth characters were observed during the initial years after plantation in the vineyard until we got the first yields. Our results did not agree with those of Pospisilova (1977) that the anticipated vigour of shoot growth will appear later in the vineyard only. However we agree with Zimmerman (1970), who showed that the differences are caused by the rootstocks in the growth habit of vines during the first two years already. The differences in shoot elongation decreased similarly to the rootstocks in the first year of fruit production. It shows us that the intense root development caused vigorous shoot growth, which we think to be a rootstock effect. When the vegetative and generative development are balanced already, the effect of scions in shoot elongation became stronger than the effect of rootstock.

We also found great differences in the maturation of wood each year from planting of the vineyard to the year of fruit production.

During the first years the differences of cane maturation were greater according to the scion varieties, the means were significantly different. In the first ripening year the differences dwindled or increased due to the rootstocks. This means that the effect of the rootstock on cane maturation became stronger in the first year of fruit production.

 

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Evaluation of different sources of resistance for breeding powdery mildew resistant grapevine varieties
35-40.

The appearance of resistance to powdery mildew was investigated on seedling progenies of interspecific crossings. Hybrids of American and East-Asian wild species and one Vitis vinifera variety (Janjal kara) were used as source of resistance in the crossings. The resistance of foliage and of berries were tested in the field at the time ...of vintage. The degree of resistance was ranked into six classes.

In American and Asian hybrid derivatives there were few highly resistant progenies, but in the hybrids of Janjal kara variety more than 90 % of the progenies proved to be highly resistant to powdery mildew. According to the distribution of classes of resistance in the populations the resistance of American and Asian sources are mostly influenced by additive gene affects. The resistance of Janjal kara seemed to be mono or digenic.

No close correlation was found between the powdery mildew resistance of the foliage and that of the berries.

 

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Somatic embriogenesis and regeneration of Vitis sp.
41-45.

Somatic embriogenesis and regeneration of Vitis sp.

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The main colouring substance and essential oil components of different carrot varieties
46-49.

Investigating colouring components it was found that the p carotene being the most important from the point of view of nutrition constitutes about 60-70% of the total colouring material, whereas the ratio of a carotene is 18-34%.

Among the varieties having a short growing season the common incidence rate of the a and 13 carotene is very... high (92.49 %), even a lower total colouring material content (178.02 ppm) results in bright orange red carrot roots.

The incidence of a and carotene represents, however, only 84.24% of the similar total colouring material value (171.74 ppm) measured in Nantais.

Among the storage varieties Fertődi vörös has the highest value of total colouring substance (213.04 ppm) from which the common proportion of the two carotene (a and (3) compounds amounts to 93.77%.

When testing the essential oil components the cariophyllen shows the highest incidence rate, which has a negative influence on the flavour materials of the carrot. Among the early varieties in Nantais Forto this quantity amounts to 24.08 ppm which is almost twice as much as the amount measured in Nantais. We found a similarly unfavourable quantity in %lords &ids (25.47 ppm).

Looking at the beta-pinen and 1-limonen of a bactericidal effect the quantity of l-limonen is higher (1.36 ppm on the average of the varieties). Among the varieties that have a longer growing season and which are suitable for processing Fertődi vörös is the best in terms of essential oil and colour content. Its beta-pinen content was above the average of this variety (1.12 ppm) while its 1-limonen content was considerably high (1.26 ppm).

 

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Luminescence variations in cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) leaves derived from different regeneration systems
50-52.

Plants obtained from in vitro culture can show increased susceptibility to environmental stress conditions. In the process of their adaptation to natural conditions it requires monitoring of their physiological state. The methods used to check this phenomenon should estimate quickly and exactly the tolerance to suboptimal environmental... factors. Such requirements are satisfied by the methods of measuring chlorophyll luminescence in vivo, e.g. fluorescence induction and delayed luminescence. The objects of our studies were cucumber plants regenerated from cultures of callus and embryogenic cell suspension, as well as the plants obtained from seeds. The plants derived from in vitro cultures displayed a poor physiological condition at the early phase of adaptation characterised by higher susceptibility both to stress caused by increased density of the light flux and low temperature (4 °C) in comparison with the plants obtained from seeds.

 

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The effect of modified bacterial virulence to host-pathogen relationship (Phaseolus vulgaris L. Pseudomonas savastanoi pv. phaseolicola)
53-56.

The Pseudomonas savastanoi pv. phaseolicola is one of the most expressive biogen stressors of the bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) in Hungary. The chemical and agrotechnological defence is inefficient, so breeding is the only workable way. The conventional cultivars are susceptible to PS while most of the new industrial varieties ...have genetic resistance to the pathogen. The genetic background of resistance is, however, a complex system in the bean. Leaf resistance is a monogenic system, but this gene is not expressed in juvenile stage of the host. The pathogen species can be divided into different races. After inoculation with virulent strains, typical symptoms appeared on the leaves. To understand the details of host-pathogen relationships, there were carried out experiments using bacterial strains with altered virulence. Six transposon mutants of the PS were tested. Our main objective was to test these modified bacterial strains on bean cultivars of known genetic background. First we analysed the symptoms, and then the correlation between the symptoms and the multiplication of mutant bacteria. Three cultivars (Cherokee, Inka and Főnix) were tested.

The infection by the virulent PS isolate produced typical symptoms on the three cultivars tested. Mutant bacteria (except strain 756) did not cause any significant symptoms on the hosts. The mutant 756 induced visible symptoms on the cultivars Cherokee and Inka. On Cherokee there were small watersoaked lesions, and HR (hypersensitivity reaction) was detected on Inka, but this was restricted to some cells only (mikro HR). The rate of multiplication of the wild type strain was much higher than the multiplication of the mutants. Bacteria were detected in the cotyledons and primordial leaf, but there is not any substantial number of bacteria in leaves, except for strains 757, 1212 and 1213. The rate of multiplication of strain 756 was intermediate. These, and other experiments can help to understand the genetic background of resistance and the host-pathogen relationship in the Pseudomonas-bean pathosystem.

 

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Attempting Regeneration from Cultured Cotyledons and Plant Regeneration from Cotyledonary Nodes in Common Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.)
57-60.

Dry seeds from two cultivars of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) were germinated on sterile cotton and sterile deionized distilled water. Cotyledonary node tissue of seedlings were cultured on Murashige and Skoog(MS)-based media supplemented with different combination of N6-benzyl-aminopurine (BAP) and indole-3-acetic aci...d (IAA), and benzyladenine (BA) and a-naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA). The results revealed that the regeneration percent and the average number of buds and shoots per explant were influenced by the type of explants and exogeneously added hormones. Multiple shoot induction on dry bean cotyledonary node that contain 4-5 mm from cotyledons and hypocotyl on a medium containing full concentration of MS inorganic salts supplemented with 0.5mg/1 BA and 0.1mg/1 NAA was feasible and the method can be applied in transformation experiments.

 

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Shoot induction and plant regeneration from cotyledon segments of the muskmelon variety "hógolyó"
61-64.

Cotyledonary segments of the casaba type muskmelon variety "Hógolyó" were used to induce organogenesis. Fifty different hormone combinations were applied to enhance the induction of shoot formation on the edge of the segments. The phases of organogenesis were followed with light- and scanning electron microscope. Shoot induction was achieved ...with high frequency. The shoots were transferred to hormone free media for root induction. The rooted plantlets were planted out to soil.

NAA was feasible and the method can be applied in transformation experiments.

 

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Identification of plant taxons by isoelectric focusing
65-67.

Differences were demonstrated in esterasei coenzyme pattern of some essential oil producing plants belonging to the Apiaceae family — fennel (Foeniculum vulgare Mill.), angelica (Angelica archangelica L.), lovage (Levisticum officinale Koch.), dill (Anethum graveolens L.), coriander (Coriandrum sativum L.), anise (Pimpinella anisum L.), caraw...ay (Carum carvi L.) — as well as differences between two varieties of fennel seed by using isoelectric focusing. That method provides quality control in essential oil plants and is suitable to describe isoenzyme pattern characteristic for taxons.

Based on our findings, isoelectric focusing seems to be suitable for identification and differentiation of different plant samples, providing an easy tool for further processing as well as for breeding.

Our further aim is to apply that method to differentiate among samples belonging to the same species according to their value of inner content.

 

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Improved evaluation method for reliable distinction of poppy (Papaver somniferum L.) cultivars
68-73.

Investigating seven Hungarian standard cultivars (i.e. 'A1’, 'Kék Gemona', '13C-2`,'Kék Duna', `Kompolti M’, `Gödi N',

'Kozmosz) it was proved that for the reliable distinction between cultivars a complex analysis is necessitated. Because of the large morpho­phenological and production-biological plasticity of the species qualit...ative and quantitative features as well as alkaloid accumulation characters have to be evaluated simultaneously applying discriminant analysis.

It was proved by the investigations that some of the qualitative and quantitative characters included into the DUS evaluation procedure have slight importance for reliable distinction. As an example the majority of cultivars show high inhomogentity in such characters like the shape of stigmatic disc, the number of stigmatic lobes etc. Furthermore these characters never had been chosen for the goal of any practical selection and are modified by the weather conditions as well.

In the evaluation process the alkaloid accumulation characteristics (both qualitative and quantitative ones) have to be evaluated on a higher rank. For instance the high accumulation level of morphine in cv. 'A1' (10.5 %o), exceptionally high narcotine accumulation in 'Kék Gemona' (7.8 %o), or the low morphine accumulation level in cv. 'Kozmosz' (1.1 %o) proved to be proper characters for their distinction, alone. However, at the same time the weather conditions existing at the time of experiment have to be taken into consideration. From practical point of view, the years rich in precipitation and poor in sunshine are less suitable for distinction of cultivars selected for higher alkaloid accumulation, especially for production of codeine and thebaine characterized by a higher methylation level. Based on the example of 'Kék Gemona', the accumulation level of morphine decreases from 7.4 %o to 4.1 %o under such conditions, while thebaine and codeine disappear, practically.

 

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Investigation of flowering dynamics of the basil (Ocimum basilicum L.) and its consequences in production
74-80.

The flowering dynamics of Ocimum basilicum L., (a common population maintained at the UHFI) was studied with the aim to create an exact and practically applicable method for definition of phenological phases.

According to our observation the development of individual flowers of the basil can be characterized by 8 distinguishabl...e phases, which must be considered for description of the actual phenological stage of a spike.

An accurate model was created for the unambiguous description of flowering process of different flowers within the spike and for the individual plant as a whole. The new flowering index formula is calculated from the number of flowers weighed by their phenological phases.

The time dependence of flowering is presented by functions fitted to values of the flowering index. The results reflected different patterns of the main inflorescence, the inflorescences formed on the side shoots in the first or in the second half of the flowering period. However, for description of the flowering process of the whole plant, a sigmoid function proved to be the appropriate model.

The accumulation process of the essential oil could be characterized by the flowering index values. They showed close correlation (r=0.964) at high probability.

The new method assures an exact definition of phenological phases in basil. Its application seems to be optimal during breeding procedures, seed production and even in production of high quality drugs, according to the requirements of the Good Agricultural Practice (Guidelines for GAP, 1998).

 

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The role of rejuvenated and adult forms of English oak (Quercus robur) in in vitro cultures
81-83.

In vitro plant material of clones (Q. robur) NL 100 A (adult) and NL 100 R (rejuvenated) received from Germany (A. Meier-Dinkel, 1995) were used in these experiments. WPM medium was used for the multiplication phase. Plantlets were subcultured monthly. Differences in quality and colour of the adult and rejuvenated cultures ind...uced us to follow and compare the changes of mineral- and chlorophyll content and dry weight during the propagation phase. Mineral and chlorophyll content as well as dry weight were measured weekly on three samples during the subculture period.

In the case of propagation rates we stated, they were similar around the year, but both clones had a high peak in April. Examining the cation-content, we detected that, the plantlets had a highest quantity of several elements during the 2nd and 3rd week of subculture. The iron content was the highest in the 1st week and after that it decreased continuously. It is supposed, that the content of iron is not enough in the media. The chlorophyll content of the rejuvenated clone was higher than that of the adult one.

In the rooting experiments it was stated that, after one-week cold treatment the rooting ability was the best.

 

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Stress physiology of palm trees II. The effect of heavy metals and high irradiance on the photosynthesis of palm Trachycarpus fortunei
84-88.

A study was carried out to analyse the individual and combined effects of heavy metal toxicity and high irradiance on the photosynthetic characteristics of young, fully expanded leaves of palm seedling Trachycarpus fortunei under laboratory conditions. Heavy metals were found to inhibit both the light and dark reactions of photosynthes...is and the inhibition was more affected in the light than in the dark. Single photoinhibitory conditions caused a 60 % decrease in the electron transport activity after 120 min of light exposure which was completely reversible in the dark. In contrast, the combined effect of high light and heavy metal treatment resulted in a 90 % decrease in the activity, but no reversible recovery in the dark could be detected. This indicated that the simultaneous effect of these two stress factors led to irreversible damages of the photosynthetic machinery and as a consequence caused the general destruction of the plant.

Abbreviations and symbols: Fo: initial chlorophyll fluorescence; Fm: maximum total fluorescence; Fv: variable fluorescence; AFi: intermediate level of fluorescence induction; PSII: photosystem 2.

 

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Anatomical structure of stem in the above- and underground portions of Rosa rugosa suckers
89-91.

Comparitive histological studies were made on the underground and the aboveground stem parts of Rosa rugosa taken from one year old suckers. The underground stem parts were characterized with thicker primary cortex, phloem and pith, weaker phloem fibers, wider cambial zone, medullary rays, xylem and phloem rays as compared with the aboveground ...stem parts. The most marked differences in the underground stem parts were in the wide cambial zone and in the development of some adventitious roots.

 

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The in vitro and in vivo anatomical structure of leaves of Prunus x Davidopersica ‘Piroska' and Sorbus rotundifolia L. ‘Bükk szépe'
92-95.

Immature in vitro leaves showed similar structure of the mesophyll tissue to the immature field-grown (in vivo) leaves of Prunus x davidopersica `Piroska'. Mature leaf anatomical characteristics of in vitro plantlets differ from the field-grown plants. The mesophyll tissue of in vitro plantlets were thinner than the in vivo plants and consisted... of only one layer palisade parenchyma, the shape of the cells and the structure of spongy parenchyma basically differed from the field-grown plants. In the case of Sorbus rotundifolia similar anatomical differences were found both in vitro and in vivo as in the case of Prunus x davidopersica `Piroska'.

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Toxicity of fungicides to honey bees (Hymenoptera: Apidae) and their effects on bee foraging behavior, pollen viability and fruit set on blooming apples and pears
96-98.

Fungicides fosetyl-AL, triadimefon, dodine, mycobutanil and fenarimol were tested for honey bee (Apis mellifera L.) mortality and effect on bee foraging, pollen viability and fruit set in blooming apple and pear. None of the materials were toxic to honey bees or reduced pollen gemination or fruit set.

 

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The quality and storage efficiency of some apple varieties as a function of picking date, area of production and duration of storage
99-103.

Numerous apple varieties have been tested parallel with traditional Jonathan varieties during four years, 1990-1994 on three different geographical areas of Hungary. The picking time took place at three different times in a year: ten days before the probably optimal picking time, at close-to-optimal picking time, and ten days after the optimal ...picking time. The effect of storage on quality of fruits have been tested in February, March, and April under circumstances of a semi-industrial storage experiment.

The results of experience can contribute to answer numerous current, from point of view of practice important topics:

  • The stochastic relations between various fruit quality parameters at different varieties
  • The change of fruit — quality during storage
  • The effect of different picking date on storage losses
  • The possibilities of storage — loss predicting by the utilization of multiple regression analysis.

The most important results of experiences are as follows :

  1. The starch — degradation test and Streiff — index are well applicable for practical purposes to determine the optimal harvest-date.
  2. On base of analysis of various losses and physiological diseases the high importance of mass loss is obvious. In the variety Jonnee the earlier picking date considerably increased the mass loss. The effect of variety on mass loss is rather limited. In the Jonathan varieties the Jonathan spot was a rather important physiological disease. The late picking time increased the frequency of Jonathan - spot. At optimal date of harvest at Jonnee the frequency of Jonathan -spot was lower, than at Jonathan M 41. In the Jonathan M41 and Jonnee the importance of scald was rather limited, but in the Wellspur Delicious and Smoothee this disease occurred relatively frequently. In the Smoothee the earlier picking time considerably increased the probability of scald.
  3. The multiple regression analysis yielded reliable results, fit for prediction of storage losses and diseases on the base of chemical and physical properties, determined at the time of picking.

 

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