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Production and disposition of purebred Jersey populations
Published November 24, 2008
89-96

In Hungary crossbreeding wit Jersey has been in practice since 2004. Uniquely in the Hungarian history of the Jersey breed two times fifty head pregnant heifers were imported in 2006. The aim of our study is to present through the description of the production and the type traits of the population the inherent possibilities of Jersey. The breed... is presented by the figures of the rolling lactations, 305 day milk production, correlations between the traits and by the results of the evaluation of type traits. Analyses of the data were done by using independent samples t-test.
Based on data of 87 cows the average number of days in milk  is 308 and 48 cows has finished lactation. During the rolling lactation they produced 5050 kg milk with 5.34% fat and 3.8% protein content.
The first lactation Jersey cows’ production when corrected to 305 days was 5089 kg milk with 5.35% fat and 3.81% protein. Between the herds there was significant difference in milk kg, amount of fat produced, protein content and amount of protein produced. On the two farms distribution of cows belonging to different production levels is very different. The biggest difference is when categorized by the amount of milk produced.
Correlation between the milk kg and fat kg is the greatest (r=0.950). Similar values were obtained for the correlation between fat and protein kg (r=0.919) and for the milk kg and fat kg (r=0,898). 
Disposition of the Jersey cows is very well balanced. Their stature, strength, body depth, dairy form, rump angle and pin width is favorable, the average scores are between 4.5 and 6.5. The leg of the cows is a bit sickly, and is hocking in a little with medium-low angled hoof. Average values of all traits describing the udder are between 4 and 5. Cows belonging to the two herds differ by disposition. Significant difference exists in the following traits: body depth, dairy form, pin width, rear leg - side view, rear leg, rear view, foot angle, fore udder attachment, teat length. The
Jersey population imported to Hungary has a final score of 78 points which equals with the “good” qualification. 

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The effect of different fat content fish feed on the production parameters and meat quality of the hybrid striped bass
Published February 10, 2013
33-37

...5); font-variant-ligatures: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; text-decoration-style: initial; text-decoration-color: initial;">The interspecific ’hybrid striped bass’ is the result of cross breeding. Their offspring have got good chances of growth and tolerate extreme water temperatures and the content of dissolute oxygen more than their parents. Furthermore, they are more resistant to diseases. Therefore, the hybrid is perfectly suitable for intensive fishery production.

Our experiment lasted for seven weeks. We analysed the indices of growth and production of the hybrid as the consequence of nurturing them with two feeds of high nutritive value during this period. We examined the content of fat and of fatty acids in the flesh of these fish. There were no considerable differences in terms of weight gain, feed conversion ratio and uneven growth between the two groups, while survival was less likely among the the fish which had consumed more fat. We demonstrated, examining the flesh of the individuals which had consumed feed containing lower fat content, that it was fattier and contained more dry matter than those that had been fed of higher fat content. Besides, the content of omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids was higher in the fish that had consumed less lipids.

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Changes in fatty acid composition of pork rich in conjugated linoleic acid frying in different kind of fats
Published December 21, 2009
31-35

In 1990ys antiatherogen, antioxidant and anticarcinogen effect of conjugated linolacids (CLA) was detected. From this reasons, our aims in this study were producing pork rich in CLA and studying the change of fatty acid composition of the produced pork cooked different kind of fats. For frying palm and sunflower oil and swine fat were used. Thi...gh was cutted for 100 g pieces. Meat pieces were fried at 160 °C for 1 and 8 minutes. Estimation of frying data it was determined that higher (0.13%) CLA content of pork was spoiled (60-70%) except in case of swine fat cooking,
because it is extremly sensitive for oxidation and heating. Swine fat has higher (0.09%) CLA content than plant oil, protecting the meat’s original CLA content. Cooking in swine fat did not have significant effect on fatty acid composition of meat. Low level of palmitic acid contect of sunflower oil (6.40%) decreased for half part of palmitic acid content of pork (24.13%) and it produced cooked meat with decreased oil acid content. Contrary of above, linoleic acid content of fried meat was increased in different folds as compared to crude pork. If it was fried in sunflower oil with high level linoleic acid increased (51.52%) the linoleic acid content in fried pork. The linoleic acid content of the high level CLA pork increased four times (48.59%) to the crude meat (16.59% and 12.32%). The high palmitic acid content of palm fat (41.54%) increased by 60% the palmitic acid content in fried pork, low stearic acid (4.44%) and linoleic acid content (10.56%) decreased the stearic and linoleic acid content of crude meat.

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Effect of dietary fatty acids on the oxidative stability and the colour of broiler meat
Published May 23, 2006
25-30

The aim of our investigation was to determine the effects of increased PUFA (polyunsaturated fatty acids) content on the colour, total pigment content, organoleptic characteristics and oxidative stability of poultry meat. The experiment was carried out with 1200 Ross-308 cock chicklings. Animals were fed with a 3 phase diet, and in each phase, ...additional fat was added to the feed. The isocaloric and isonitrogenic feed was produced as the breeder organization suggested; only the fat content differed (4 treatments: pig fat (lard), sunflower oil, soy oil, flax-seed oil).
The different fat complements did not influence broiler production. However, the fatty acid composition of meat was similar to the fatty acid composition of feed (additional fats). The analyses of meat samples, after a storage period, did not significantly prove the possible negative effects of higher PUFA content.

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Effect of anthocyanin-rich Hungarian tart cherry extract on blood antioxidant status in C57BL/6J mice
Published September 5, 2018
335-341

In this study male C57BL/6J (B6) mice were used to determine the possible effects of our Hungarian tart cherry extract in a chronic obesity mouse model on antioxidant capacity.

The control group received standard mouse chow, the high fat control group was switched to high fat diet and tap water supplemented with 5% sucrose. The high fat...+anthocyanin group received the high fat and sucrose diet, but dissolved in the drinking water they received anthocyanin-rich tart cherry extract. After six weeks, the antioxidant capacity and SOD activity were measured. Antioxidant capacity was decreased with a significant elevation of SOD activity. The tart cherry extract made a significant enhancement in antioxidant capacity and SOD activity. Our results show that chronic anthocyanin intake has a potential to enhance redox status associated with obesity.

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Autumn and winter kidney fat indexes of roe deer does and their correlation with reproductive parameters
Published May 6, 2013
61-65

...5); font-variant-ligatures: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; text-decoration-style: initial; text-decoration-color: initial;">I studied the variations of kidney fat indexes (KFI) in two game management units of the Great Hungarian Plain between 2002 and 2004 in the autumn and winter months. I was looking for correlation between the autumn and winter KFI as well as between the autumn KFI and reproductive parameters (number of corpora lutea, recruitment rate).

There was a significant positive correlation between the average winter and the average next autumn KFI (r=0.991, p<0.1). The average winter KFI showed strong positive correlation with the average number of corpora lutea (CL) in the next rutting season (r=0.978, p<0.05). The average autumn KFI and the average grown up offspring showed positive but not significant correlation (r=0.725, p=0.275).

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The Fattening and Slaughtering Examination at the Hungarian Racka Sheep
Published May 4, 2004
37-42

Fattening and slaughtering characteristics of both types (black and white) of the Hungarian racka sheep were investigated at the site of the National Institute for Agricultural Quality Control in Atkár. The Hungarian merino, the dairy cigaja and the British milksheep were applied as control groups. 10 animals were examined from both sexes in e...ach genotype. The examination was carried out according to the principles set in the Codex for sheep breeding. During the test acute diarrhoea occurred in each control group. However, only few lambs were excluded from the test from the British milksheep and the Hungarian merino groups because of significant changes in their condition. Consequently, the results obtained were not significantly influenced. No symptoms of any illness could be recognised in the Hungarian racka sheep, though. The significance of the difference between the average of the examined groups were checked by T-tests.
Daily gain was significantly less compared to the control groups, except for the white racka males. The lambs starving for 24 hours before slaughtering weighed 25.3-30.0 kgs on average. The black and white racka females weighed the least while the Hungarian merino females weighed the most. The quantity of abdominal and kidney fat was significant in the case of our native females. The quantity of abdominal fat was significantly bigger compared to each control group. On comparing the investigated groups it turned out that the white racka males had the biggest skin weight while the white Hungarian racka females had the smallest, that is the two extremes were recognised in the same colour (white) of one bred. On qualifying the slaughtered animals females had better results than males in each bred; the racka sheep were better than the dairy cigaja but were worse than the Hungarian merino and British sheep groups.
The huge differences in the carcasses of the groups were seen clearly when chopping. Examining the leg, it was noticed that the native groups proved to be smaller than the control groups, except for the black racka males. As for the short loin, the Hungarian racka and the Hungarian merino sheep proved to be the best, whereas the dairy cigaja and the British milk males had much smaller ones. The results gained when investigating the rack were similar to those of the short loin. As far as the rib and shoulder are concerned, the black racka females and the dairy cigaja females had the worst results. After chopping, the right side was also boned in every group. The small proportion of bone in the case of racka sheep was easily noticeable that resulted in the fact that the white racka females had the highest quantity of short loin compared to the other groups. When examining the back quarter, the bone proportions of the 4 racka groups proved to be significantly less than those of the control groups but it was not true for the meat proportions. As for the front quarter meat, the racka males were prominent in the great shoulder meat and in the small proportion of bone. The quantity of the first quarter bone was the least in the case of racka sheep and was the biggest for dairy cigajas. This difference proved to be significant in most cases.
In short, the Hungarian racka groups had the best results in meat quantity, which was especially significant compared to the dairy cigaja sheep. However, the quantity of external fat increased.

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Meat meal and industrial fat as alternative fuels in agriculture
Published November 15, 2007
220-222

I study new energy sources which can replace fossil fuels. As I deal with the burning processes, I have analyzed several kinds of wastes. I think one solution for replacing fossil fuels would be to burn regenerated energy sources in agriculture. For example, oil, industrial fat and meat meal from processing plants are treated as hazardous waste...s. There exist non-hazardous wastes for energy recovery, as by-products e.g. sawdust, wood shavings, vegetable oils, stems of plants or poultry manure.
We should produce energy from the outsides of vegetables and juices, and should produce bioethanol by fermenting vegetable wastes. We could treat the used vegetable oil to make bio-diesel fuel. Meat meal and fat are good alternative energy forms, if burnt in incineration plants. These materials are new renewable sources of energy.
There are some problems in the use of biomass for energy sources. We have to look for the best loading device and burning processes.

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Influence of H-FABP gene polymorphisms on slaughter value of hybrid pigs
Published September 5, 2018
55-60

...5); font-variant-ligatures: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; text-decoration-style: initial; text-decoration-color: initial;">The H-FABP gene was defined as a potential candidate gene influencing the fat deposition traits, primarily the intramuscular fat content. The aim of this study is to define whether the previously reported gene mutations are connected with the slaughter traits measured in a standard slaughterhouse. The study included data from 405 gilts and barrows from 2 different samples. The two chosen mutation (HFABP1: c. 103 T>C, HFABP2: c. 1970 T>C) were detected in one reaction with PCR-RFLP (Polymerase Chain Reaction-Restriction Fragment Lenght Polymorphism) method with HinfI restrictoin enzyme. The allel frequencies are as follows: 103T(H)=0.75; 103C(h)=0.25, 1970T=0.32; 1970C=0.68. A HFABP1 mutation has significant effect on backfat thickness and lean meat % at stable 1 (sample 1), but there were no effect at stable 2 (sample 2). The analysis of values of production traits, depending on HFABP2 genotype did not reveal significant differences. Based on this study we can’t get a clear conclusion on the impact of polymorphisms on production parameters. In the examined flock the allele frequency of mutation in 5 'UTR is identical to the literature data, i. e. the more favorable variant regarding the intramuscular fat content is predominant in the population.

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Effect of sex on some composition traits of wild boar (wild pig) meat
Published December 21, 2009
25-29

The authors examined the nutrition value of the meat of shot wild boars (wild pigs) (n=66) from three wild boar enclosures with different feeding intensity and also the technological properties of the meat. Samples were taken immediately after the evisceration. Considering the storing and processing properties of game meat the samples were take...n from m. serratus anterior. As for dry matter examination results, the highest values were measured in case of semi-intensively fed wild boars, then followed the data from the samples of intensively and extensively fed wild boars. The fat content from the meat samples of intensively and extensively fed wild boars proved to be lower while in case of the semi-ntensively fed wild boars it was higher. In females the dry matter content, while in males the fat content was higher. As for the protein content there were no differences in either the feeding groups or in the genders. It was only the water holding capacity of the samples from the meat of the females from semi-intensive feeding intensity wild boar enclosure that fell in between normal values.

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Carcass and the Meat Quality of Hungarian Lambs
Published May 12, 2002
65-71

The author investigated 153 lambs of nine genotypes originating from breeding flocks, and 50 lambs originating from production flocks. The investigations were performed between 1995 and 1998. The authors discuss the evaluation of comformation and fat cover according to EUROP standards. The authors also investigate the proportion of valuable mea...t by genotype, and – out of the internal value indicators – the dry-matter, protein, fat, connective-tissue and hemin contents comparing the flavour, aroma, tenderness, and oven loss of the different genotypes.

The following findings should be highlighted:
♦ The Hungarian Merino breed should be improved, as – according to EUROP standards, more than 70% of these animals were rated as quality „R”.
♦ Hungarian fattening technology has to be preserved, as the lambs reach the desired slaughter weight within a short period of time, and without over-fattening.
♦ Readiness for slaughter, typical of each genotype, has to be defined, and slaughter at proper weight be achieved.
♦ It has to be re-evaluated whether the Hungarian Merino is the only breed which can be used in Hungary, as none of the investigations really proved the special characteristics and significance of this breed.
The author summarizes the findings of the investigation in five tables.

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Effect of the claw disorders on production performance in dairy cattle
Published February 3, 2016
15-19

The aim of the study was the influence of claw disorders on production traits in dairy cattle. Observed were claw traits as claw angle, claw length, heel index, claw height, claw diagonal and claw width. Right hind claw after functional trimming was evaluated. Occurrence of claw disorders like interdigital dermatitis and heel erosion (IDHE), di...gital dermatitis (DD) and sole ulcer (SV) as well as the progress of disease were observed. Basic summary and variation statistics was performed by the SAS software. Two herds were included in the study. Holstein dairy cows (n=101) produced 11 875 kg of milk, 468 kg (3.94%) of fat and 396 kg (3.34%) of proteins. Holstein cows were affected with IDHE in 22 cases, with DD in 6 cases and with sole ulcer in 10 cases. Slovak Simmental dairy cows (n=101) produced 5834 kg of milk, 258 kg (4.44%) of fat and 209 kg (3.59%) of proteins. Slovak Simmental cows were affected with IDHE in 8 cases, with DD in 5 cases and with sole ulcer in 19 cases. Observed was that claw disorders caused deviations of milk production.

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Examination of repeatability of ultrasound scanning technique in young bulls
Published November 24, 2008
43-48

The author’s goal with the methodology examination was to determine repeatability of taking and evaluating ultrasound images. In the trial an operator person took two images about the ribeye area and rump fat thickness (P8) of every young bull, which were measured by the same person in four repetitions. Also, we had altogether eight images ab...out the same part of the body. Images were collected using Falco 100 (Pie Medical) real-time ultrasonic scanner equipped with an ASP 3,5 MHz, 18 cm linear array transducer.

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Changes of the fatty acid composition of sprouts during germination
Published December 15, 2010
89-92

During our research we studied the fat content and fatty acid composition during the germination and sprouting periods of the most important sprouts: wheat, lentil, alfalfa, radish and sunflower seed. In this article we present our research results during this sprouting study. The concentration of the saturated fatty acids (palmitic acid, stear...ic acid) decreased, the concentration of the unsaturated fatty acids increased during germination, but the tendency was not so high than was published in the literature.

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A growth model to predict body weight and body composition of broilers
Published December 28, 2018
17-24

Models predicting the nutrient partitioning and animal performance have been developed for decades. Nowadays, growth models are used in practical animal nutrition, and they have particular importance in precision livestock farming. The aim of the present study was to introduce a broiler model and to provide examples on model application. The mo...del predicts protein and fat deposition as well as the body weight of an individual broiler chicken from digestible nutrient intake over time. Feed intake (FI) and the digestible nutrient content of the feed are inputs as well as some animal factors like: initial BW, feed intake at 1 and 2 kg of BW, precocity and mean protein deposition. The protein and energy metabolism is represented as in the classical nutrient partitioning models. The protein deposition (PD) is driven by digestible amino acid supply and is under “genetic control”, the so-called potential PD limits the actual PD if protein is oversupplied.

The authors discuss how the model can be used to simulate the animal response upon different scenarios. Examples are given to show that the diet might be limiting if some animal trait is changed. Applicability of the model has shown through running the model by using different feed strategies (three- vs five-phase-feeding) and variations with animal factors. In conclusion, growth models are useful tools to support decision making for defining the most suitable feeds used in a broiler farm. The model presented in this paper shows a high sensibility and flexibility to test different scenarios. By challenging the model with different inputs, the animal response in terms of changes in body weight and feed conversion can be understood more by studying the shift in deposition of chemical constituents. The examples provided in the present paper shows the benefit of using mathematical models and their applicability in precision nutrition. It can be concluded that the growth model helps to apply “from desired feed to desired food” concept.

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Examination of Fattening and Slaughtering Performance of Hungarian Merino, Ile de France F1 and Suffolk F1 Lambs
Published March 4, 2005
16-23

In our examination, we evaluated Hungarian Merino (ram n=30, ewe n=30), Ile de France F1 (ram n=10, ewe n=10) and Suffolk F1 (ram n=10, ewe n=10) lambs. The best fattening performance was shown by the Ile de France F1 lambs (361 g/day). After the fattening period, Hungarian Merino, Ile de France F1 and Suffolk F...1 genotypes lambs were slaughtered with a live weight of 30-34 kg. Carcasses were evaluated for dressing percentage, weight of valuable carcass cuts, percentage of valuable meat, bone to meat ratio, as well as meat conformation and fat cover (S/EUROP grading).
The slaughter performance proved to be the best for the Suffolk F1 concerned dressing percentage (51,7%), percentage valuable carcass cuts (81,9%). The best percentage valuable meat presented (79,4%) the Ile de France F1 lambs. The best meat conformation and fat covered were in the Suffolk F1 lambs; Hungarian Merinos showed less favourable results.
Presently, the results derived from Hungarian practice that Hungarian Merino lambs are not eligible for fattening to great live body weight (30 kg). Therefore, it is necessary to revise the Hungarian Merino lambs with meat sheep breeds.

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Storage of ram semen in gelatin supplemented extender
Published July 31, 2012
7-10

The aim of our study was to examine how different gelatin concentrations affect ram semens viability in liquid storage at 5 oC for five days. Our hypothesis was if we add gelatin to the semen extender, than the viability of ram semen will be better in the extenders containing gelatin, than the control. We used two different semen ext...enders:1.5% UHT milk and 1.5% UHT milk + 5% egg yolk. We added 0; 0.5; 1.0; 1.5; 2.0% Dr. Oetker gelatin to the semen extenders. We stored the semen for five days at 5 oC and in every 24 hour we made sampling.
We stained the smears with Kovács-Foote staining and evaluated them with light-microscope. We categorized the cells in five groups like: live and intact cells, live cells with injured acrosome, dead cells, live head with dead tail and live tail with dead head. We used one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) to assign how gelatin concentration affects the number of the categorized cells. On the fifth day, the viability was the best in the following semen extenders: 1.5% fat UHT milk + 1.0% gelatin and 1.5% fat UHT milk + 1.5% gelatin, but it was not significant (p>0.05).

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Changes of Longissimus Muscle Area and Rump Fat Thickness in Hungarian Simmental Fattening Bulls Measured Using Real-Time Ultrasound Equipment
Published March 4, 2005
11-15

The aim of the authors was to evaluate changes in the longissimus muscle area (LMA) and rump fat thickness (P8) based on real-time ultrasound scanning in the Hungarian Simmental cattle breed. Ultrasonic measurements were carried out on the same 11 Hungarian Simmental fattening bulls by Falco 100 (Pie Medical) equipment (I.: age: 357±23.47 days..., live weight: 475.55±51.40 kg; II.: age: 418±23.47 days, live weight: 555.10±54.11 kg) on two occasions. Animals were kept in small groups, on deep litter, and fed on silage and concentrate. LMA and P8 were measured on the scans, between the 12th and 13th ribs by manual outlining. Results for the investigated traits during the examinations were as follows: P8: I.: 0.373±0.154 cm, II.: 0.624±0.161 cm; LMA: I.: 65.72±5.89 cm2, II.: 71.74±8.94 cm2. During the fattening period, P8 increased significantly (I-II.: t=3.73, P<0.001). A significant positive correlation was calculated between results of measurements I. and II. in the case of LMA (r=0.71, P<0.05). Results imply the possibility of selling bulls with smaller LMA earlier, at lower body weight. Application of ultrasonic measurements in fattening technology could generate a more quality-related pricing system.

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Impact of lameness on the milk production of ewes
Published March 23, 2016
5-7

The aim of this study was assessing the impact of lameness on the milk production, somatic cells count and component of milk. We assess also impact of lameness on the order of entry into the milking parlour.

The experiment was carried at the farm, located in northern Slovakia. The farm keeps sheep Improved Valachian. Samples of milk wer...e taken during two periods: May, July. It was taken 428 samples together. We recorded three groups by lameness- strong lame, slightly lame, non-lame ewes. We recorded also the order of entry of ewes into the milking parlour in milking row. The results were mathematically processed using the Microsoft Excel program and statistically evaluated by SAS.

We found significant statistical differences between months (P<0.0001) in all the above mentioned indicators. In July we recorded 26 ewes with slightly lameness and 18 ewes with strong lameness. Other ewes were non-lame. Non-lame sheep had in July the highest milk yield (356±148 ml) and the lowest decrease in milk yield from May to July (-206±131 ml) compared with slightly (317±116 ml, -223±163) and strong (319±122 ml, -219±151 ml) lame ewes. However, these differences were not statistically significant. We have not identified statistically significant differences between groups in somatic cells count (logxSCC for non-lame: 4.83±0.608 in ml, slightly lame: 4.76±0.653 in ml, strong lame 4.71±0.787 in ml). Milk composition (fat, proteins, lactose) nor changes in the composition of milk that occurred between May and July were not affected by lameness of ewes. But lameness in July affected the change the order of entry of ewes in the milking parlour in July compared with the order of entry recorded in May.

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The possibility of increasing at the conjugated linoleic acid content in pork
Published September 8, 2020
27-32

The composition of fatty acids in food products is a significant factor in human health. Feeding can significantly influence the composition of fatty acids in the animal fat. We analysed the effect of feeding high CLA-content (conjugated linoleic acid) feed on the composition of fatty acids in pork. The animals were grouped according to the fol...lowing: Group 1) feeding experimental, ghee-mixed feed for 76 days, Group 2) feeding the same feed, but only for 33 days, Group 3) feeding sunflower-oil-mixed feed for 76 days. Ghee contains CLA in high amount. The aim of our experiment is to analyse how the high CLA content influences the fatty acid content of pork. In the end of the fattening experiment the animals were slaughtered, then samples were taken from the loin, ham, abdomen and backfat from 10 animals from each group and analysed the fatty acid content. We found significant differences between the average fatty acid content of the samples. As an effect of feeding ghee-enriched feed, the CLA content significantly increased, compared to the control group. However, the linoleic acid and the arachidonic acid content were lower, and the proportion of fatty acids was also lower when feeding control feed.

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Comparison of Reproductive Performance of the Roe Deer (Capreolus capreolus, L.) Among Different Regions
Published October 11, 2006
41-46

The potential and actual number of offspring of roe deer and the difference between these figures (prenatal and postnatal loss) significantly vary in each population yearly. The objective of this study is to examine the potential and actual number of offspring, the number of losses, and to find a link between the most important biological chara...cteristics of does (body weight – BW, condition – KFI) and the number of raised offspring on four territories on the Great Hungarian Plain.
Where the number of corpora lutea (CL) is the highest, there the losses are the highest as well, and the number of raised offspring is the lowest (region I.). Here, the rearing loss is double that of the weakest territory (region IV.). Rearing losses can be associated with the fenotype of does (BW, KFI) but environmental factors also have determinative importance. Where the number of twin-calving does was the highest, I found four times more does without a fawn than where the number of twin-calving does was the lowest. The nursing success was the best (the losses were lowest) in the region where the potential offspring (number of CL) was also the lowest, but the coverage of the habitat and the proportion of forests were largest. The food supply for the animals in autumn and winter are not enough, the structure of the habitat has to be improved as well, so that it might become adequate for game protection in extreme weather conditions.
The results have to be considered as preliminary ones. It is essential to continue and extend the research to increase the reliability of the results.

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Changes of chemical composition and nutritive values of Reed Canary Grass (Phalaroides arundinacea) in first growth
Published December 1, 2010
37-42

Change in chemical composition and nutritive value of Reed Canary Grass (Phalaroides arundinacea) were investigated in springtime in 2004-2006. The nutritive value of Reed Canary Grass was observed between the end of April and the middle of June relating to the following parameters: crude protein, crude fibre, crude fat, ash, N-free extract, ne...t-energy growth, net-energy maintenance, Metabolizable Protein Energy dependent,
Metabolizable Protein N-dependent.
It was also analysed whether a relationship between the climatic factors affecting the growing period as well the chemical composition of grasses and the annual weather were looked for. For the estimation of weather conditions the climate index was calculated. A correlation can be detected between the change of parameters of nutritive value and the quality of the current year. Between 2004 and 2006, the result of the analysis of nutritive value indicated a significant difference with respect to each chemical composition at the rate of P<0.01 depending on the time when the samples were taken. According to the outlined data it can be stated that the change of the value of crude protein and ash show decreasing  endency agreeing the research literature. In parallel with the change of nutritive value, the amount of crude fibre and N-free extract increased. However, the value of Net-Energy maintenance revealed an alteration only in the first half of the observed period. The same alteration tendency can be detected
in the Net-Energy growth. 

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Effect of feeding linseed on the fatty acid composition of milk
Published February 10, 2013
45-50
...400; word-spacing: 0px; vertical-align: baseline; white-space: normal; orphans: 2; widows: 2; font-variant-ligatures: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; text-decoration-style: initial; text-decoration-color: initial;">In the last decades many researches were made to change the animal product food’s composition. The production of better fat-compound milk and dairy products became a goal in the name of health conscious nutrition. These researches were motivated by the non adequate milk fat’s fatty acid composition. There have been made researches in order to modify the milk’s fatty acids’ composition to reach the expectations of functional foods. With the optimal supplement of the feed can be increased the proportion of the polyunsaturated fatty acids and can decreased the saturated fatty acids. Row fat content of milk was not decreasing in the course of examination neither of the cold extruded linseed nor the whole linseed supplement as opposed to observations experienced by other authors. In case of monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids when supplementing with cold extruded linseed the most significant change was observable in the concentration of the elaidic acid, oleic acid, linoleic acid, alfa-linolenic acid, conjugated linoleic acid. In case of saturated fatty acids the quantity of palmitic acid and myristic acid lowered considerably. When observating the feeding with whole linseed the concentration of many fatty acids from the milkfat of saturated fatty acids lowered (caprylic acid, capric acid, lauric acid, myristic acid, palmitic acid). The quantity of some unsaturated fatty acids was showing a distinct rise after feeding with linseed, this way the oleic acid, alfa-linolenic acid, conjugated linoleic acid, eicosadienoic acid. The aim of the study was to produce food which meets the changed demands of customers as well. The producing of milk with favourable fatty acid content from human health point of view can give scope propagate the products of animal origin.

 

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The possibilities of the development of functional dairy products
Published December 1, 2010
33-36

Because of our new aged world’s emerging stress, over exhausting and move less lifestyle the pollution, the not appropriate food consuming and the low calories in the consumed food there are more and more the called „civilian” disorders.
Many people have diabetes and osteoporosis others fight with lung, cardiovascular system, problems ...and find cancers of many kinds without age exemptions. 
There could be a solution in changing lifestyle. In the developed side of the world there are presence of food lines with higher content in nutritious and/or vitamins and fibers such as: kalium, calcium, selen, magnesium, plus it contains less saturated fat. Because of that there is a new word in dietetics as functional foods.
Food having more inner content and/or biological values, so healthier, are called functional foods. Those foods components picked carefully for healthiness by modern knowledge of dietetics.
One of the best raw materials for functional food is the milk. It is already healthy by itself. The Körös-Maros Biofarm Ltd. has a goal of developing and marketing, health protecting organic functional foods in hungaricum products from cured milk. The Jedlik Ányos project helps the Ltd. to achieve this goal. We just finished an antioxidant test and we check if the antioxidant in present in the milk than we check the final product of the presence of the original antioxidant and the form and amount of it.
It had been feeding, for two weeks for three herd of cows selected for age, milk output and consanguinity. All of the three herd had been feeding with basic forage. One of the herds had been getting vitamin-E in the amount of 250 mg/bwkg the other group got licopin in the amount of 200 mg/bwkg once a day each by each orally, the third herd was the control group. 
After two weeks we toke a sample of every herd were processed the samples into yogurt and cheese. Than we checked the raw milk, the cheese and the yogurt for antioxidant content with HPLC method. The test ended with good results by finding a great amount of antioxidant, in not only the raw milk but also in the final product. 

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Examination of Reproductive Performance of Roe Deer (Capreolus capreolus) in Hungary
Published December 14, 2004
33-38

The objective of the research partly is to compare the reproduction performance of the populations living in different regions with regard to some special characteristics (age, condition).
When estimating the age through tooth wear and cementum-layer-counting there was a difference of 0.87 years in favour of the first one (r=0,840; p<0,00...1). I found cementum layers at 42% of the does in the study after examining the MI teeth.
There was lose connection between the weight (eviscerated, with head and legs) and the KFI (r=0,296; p<0,01), and for further analysis, I used only the KFI as the index for condition.
The regional average KFI varied from 0.24-0.37 in fawns, 0.82-1.73 in does, with individual extremes of 0-4.05. Within the examined regions the highest index belonged to the prime-aged does, while the 1-year-olds had a lower rate, and it was the lowest in the does older than 8 years.
The rate of fertility was between 83,3(ns)-100% as we can see from the presence of the CL. All the examined does were fertile, except in one region, while among the female fawns in two regions I only found three with active ovaries. The average number of CL was 1.5-2.13, and this varied by regions; all in all it was the highest in the 2-7-year-old group (1.96) and in the ones over 8 years (2.00!), while it was lower in the does younger than 1 year (1.90). The high fertility of the does over 8 years is remarkable.
I could examine the number of embryos in two regions during the post-implantation period, and beside 100% fertility I found significant differences among the does, which can be associated with the condition. The ratio of CL carriers and the pregnant does was 100% and 73% in the two regions, the average number of CL were 1.92 and 1.72, while the average embryo number were 1.83 and 1.36 per doe. The difference between the CL and the embryo numbers on the two regions were 5% and 21%. The difference (prenatal loss) is in connection with the age (age class) of the doe. It is possible, however, that in some cases oestrus was not followed by gestation. But in roe deer, owing to the commonly known lack of luteolysis-mechanism (Flint et al., 1994), the regression of the CL of the does that did not get pregnant takes place in December and January, so the CL found in January cannot prove a previous pregnancy, which might have been followed by an abortion.
Although it has to be proven, it seems that the number of the CL (potential progeny) can be associated with the age (r=0,418; p<0,01) and the weight (r=0,312; p<0,01) of the doe, while the embryo number (realised progeny) is influenced by the age of the doe and probably by external factors.
It is essential to continue and extend the research to increase the reliability of the results and their correlation.

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