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  • Some biological features of cherry leaf spot (Blumeriella jaapii) with special reference to cultivar susceptibility
    91-93.
    Views:
    526

    In this review, some important features of biology are summarised for cherry leaf spot (Blumeriella jaapii). In the first part of the review, the geographical distribution of the pathogen and the causal organism are described. Disease symptoms and disease cycle of cherry leaf spot are also shown. Special attention is given to hosts and then several cherry cultivars.are described in relation to their susceptibility to cherry leaf spot.

  • Phytoplasma diseases of grapevine and the possible measures to control them
    37-43.
    Views:
    268

    Phytoplasmas are a special group of phloem-living pathogens in several plant species. Grapevine yellows (GY) is a term for phytoplasma diseases occurring on Vitis vinifera and inducing the same or very similar symptoms and causing severe losses worldwide. Flavescence Dorée (16SrV) phytoplasma (FD, species name: ‘Candidatus Phytoplasma vitis’) is considered a quarantine pest in several countries due to its epidemic character and high economic loss it provokes. The leafhopper Scaphoideus titanus is the univoltine and monophagous vector of FD. Bois noir disease caused by stolbur (16SrXII-A) phytoplasma (species name: ‘Candidatus Phytoplasma solani’) is described under different disease names in different countries. Hyalesthes obsoletus (Cixiidae) is the only proved polyphagous vector of BN. However, distribution of BN disease is increasing also on those areas where H. obsoletus is not prevalent or only in a very low number. Therefore the presence of other vectors cannot be concluded. The ‘Tuf-a’ type Stolbur phytoplasma is associated with stinging nettle (Urtica dioica) and the tuf-b type one to field bindweed (Convolvulus arvensis). There are only preventive control measures against phytoplasmas: the use of pathogen-free propagating material, hot water treatment of propagating material, as well as control of vectors and weeds. S. titanus can be efficiently controlled by insecticide treatments. However, in case of H. obsoletus, insecticides are not effective due to the biological characters and feeding habits of the vector.Weed control can reduce H. obsoletus specimen and their abundance to a certain extent. Extensive research is needed on wild hosts of GY phytoplasmas especially on BN phytoplasma and its vectors to the better understanding of their epidemiology.

  • Reaction of different Capsicum genotypes to four viruses
    61-64.
    Views:
    150

    The objective of this study was to examine the reaction of 44 Capsicum genotypes to common strain of Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV-C/U1), Obuda pepper virus (ObPV), NTN strain of Potato virus Y (PVYNTN) and legume strain of Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV­U/246). Reaction (extreme resistance, hypersensitive reaction, latent susceptibility, susceptibility) of the tested Capsicum species/hybrids and breeding lines seemed to be greatly depending on hosts and viruses. Out of the breeding materials 4/99 F2 and IX-8 in to CMV-U/246, while 32.Bogyisz. type, VI-57 ii. 57/83 and V-12=19/98 to TMV-C/Ui showed extreme resistance. Two lines (V-25 F1=32/98 F1 and V-27 in F4=35/98 F4) showed hypersensitive reaction to ObPV. Latent susceptibility to PVYNTN was observed in case of all eleven tested Capsicum genotypes and in case of several lines to TMV-C/U1, ObPV and CMV-U/246. Other breeding materials proved susceptible to the mentioned viruses. Pepper genotypes showing extreme resistance and hypersensitivity could be used for resistance breeding to viruses.

  • The effect of modified bacterial virulence to host-pathogen relationship (Phaseolus vulgaris L. Pseudomonas savastanoi pv. phaseolicola)
    53-56.
    Views:
    170

    The Pseudomonas savastanoi pv. phaseolicola is one of the most expressive biogen stressors of the bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) in Hungary. The chemical and agrotechnological defence is inefficient, so breeding is the only workable way. The conventional cultivars are susceptible to PS while most of the new industrial varieties have genetic resistance to the pathogen. The genetic background of resistance is, however, a complex system in the bean. Leaf resistance is a monogenic system, but this gene is not expressed in juvenile stage of the host. The pathogen species can be divided into different races. After inoculation with virulent strains, typical symptoms appeared on the leaves. To understand the details of host-pathogen relationships, there were carried out experiments using bacterial strains with altered virulence. Six transposon mutants of the PS were tested. Our main objective was to test these modified bacterial strains on bean cultivars of known genetic background. First we analysed the symptoms, and then the correlation between the symptoms and the multiplication of mutant bacteria. Three cultivars (Cherokee, Inka and Főnix) were tested.

    The infection by the virulent PS isolate produced typical symptoms on the three cultivars tested. Mutant bacteria (except strain 756) did not cause any significant symptoms on the hosts. The mutant 756 induced visible symptoms on the cultivars Cherokee and Inka. On Cherokee there were small watersoaked lesions, and HR (hypersensitivity reaction) was detected on Inka, but this was restricted to some cells only (mikro HR). The rate of multiplication of the wild type strain was much higher than the multiplication of the mutants. Bacteria were detected in the cotyledons and primordial leaf, but there is not any substantial number of bacteria in leaves, except for strains 757, 1212 and 1213. The rate of multiplication of strain 756 was intermediate. These, and other experiments can help to understand the genetic background of resistance and the host-pathogen relationship in the Pseudomonas-bean pathosystem.