Vol 10 No 3 (2004)
Articles

The effect of rootstock on the tree size of apricot cultivars

Published August 13, 2004
L. Szalay
BUESPA, Faculty of Horticultural Science, Department of Fruit Science H-1118 Budapest, Villányi út 29-43., Hungary
B. P. Molnár
BUESPA, Faculty of Horticultural Science, Department of Fruit Science H-1118 Budapest, Villányi út 29-43., Hungary
View:
pdf
How to Cite

APA

Szalay, L., & Molnár, B. P. (2004). The effect of rootstock on the tree size of apricot cultivars. International Journal of Horticultural Science, 10(3), 57-58. https://doi.org/10.31421/IJHS/10/3/489

Abstract

The apricot is propagated on several kinds of rootstocks in Hungary. The main aspects of selecting rootstocks are as follows: adaptability to environmental circumstances, primarily soil conditions, ensuring the tree size that complies with the cultivation method, and compatibility with the grafted cultivar. At advanced, intensive orchards rootstocks ensuring smaller tree size are privileged. For the establishment of the appropriate cultivation system, it is important to be aware of the expected growing vigour and tree size of certain cultivar­rootstock combinations when the orchard is designed. In the course of our experiment the size of 15-year-old trees of 4 apricot cultivars were examined on several rootstocks at an orchard in Siófok. On the basis of the data measured for each cultivar-rootstock combination, it can be stated that trees on wild apricot (P. armeniaca) rootstocks are the largest in size. Trees on prune (P. domestica) rootstock have 10-15% smaller crown volume than the previous combination. Trees on bullace (P. insititia) rootstock have the smallest tree size and their crown volume is 30-50% smaller than that of the trees on P. armeniaca rootstock. Thus, the application of prune and bullace rootstocks is beneficial at intensive apricot orchards as the size of trees can be reduced by their usage. However, their compatibility with the cultivars and their adaptability to the ecological conditions of the production site have to be tested before applying them widely. In the course of our research incompatibility was not experienced for any of the cultivar-rootstock combinations examined. Nevertheless, the drought tolerance of the rootstocks examined showed significant differences. Trees on P. domestica or P. insititia rootstock requires more water than those on P. armeniaca rootstock, therefore, they have to be irrigated.

Metrics

Metrics Loading ...