Vol 20 No 3-4 (2014)
Cikkek

Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus L.): A review of in vivo and in vitro propagation

Published September 7, 2014
N. Abdalla
Plant Biotechnology Dept., Genetic Engineering Div., National Research center, 33-El-Behouth St., 12622 Dokki, Cairo, Egypt; Agricultural Botanics, Plant Physiology and Biotechnology Dept., Debrecen Uni., AGTC Böszörményi utca. 138, 4032 Debrecen, Hungary
É. Domokos-Szabolcsy
Agricultural Botanics, Plant Physiology and Biotechnology Dept., Debrecen Uni., AGTC Böszörményi utca. 138, 4032 Debrecen, Hungary
H. El-Ramady
Agricultural Botanics, Plant Physiology and Biotechnology Dept., Debrecen Uni., AGTC Böszörményi utca. 138, 4032 Debrecen, Hungary; Soil and Water Sciences Dept., Faculty of Agriculture, Kafrelsheikh Uni., 33516 Kafr El-Sheikh, Egypt
S. Hodossi
Institute of Research and Development, Center of Agricultural Sciences, Debrecen Uni., Böszörményi utca. 138, 4032 Debrecen, Hungary
M. Fári
Agricultural Botanics, Plant Physiology and Biotechnology Dept., Debrecen Uni., AGTC Böszörményi utca. 138, 4032 Debrecen, Hungary
M. Ragab
Horticultural Sciences Dept., Faculty of Agriculture, Ain Shams University, Egypt
H. Taha
Plant Biotechnology Dept., Genetic Engineering Div., National Research center, 33-El-Behouth St., 12622 Dokki, Cairo, Egypt
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How to Cite

APA

Abdalla, N., Domokos-Szabolcsy, É., El-Ramady, H., Hodossi, S., Fári, M., Ragab, M., & Taha, H. (2014). Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus L.): A review of in vivo and in vitro propagation. International Journal of Horticultural Science, 20(3-4), 131-136. https://doi.org/10.31421/IJHS/20/3-4/1148

Abstract

Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus L.) is an old tuber crop with a recently renewed interest in multipurpose improvement. It is a perennial tuberous plant rich in inulin and is a potential energy crop. During food shortages in times of war Jerusalem artichoke received more attention by scientists and farmers because of its multiple uses as a vegetable, medicinal plant, forage plant and source for biofuel. The energy crisis of the 1970s motivated research on Jerusalem artichoke for biofuel as the aboveground plant biomass and the tubers can be used for this purpose. There are different methods to propagate Jerusalem artichoke using tubers, rhizomes, slips (transplants derived from sprouted tubers), stem cuttings, seeds and tissue culture. So, this review was presented to highlight on propagation of Jerusalem artichoke via in vivo and in vitro techniques.

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