No. I (2010): Journal Of Agricultural Sciences - Supplement
Articles

Study of animal welfare status and heat stress measures applied in dairy cow herds in Hungary

Published October 5, 2010
Richárd Gudaj
Centre for Agricultural and Applied Economics Science Faculty of Agricultural and Food Sciences and Environmental Management University of Debrecen
István Komlósi
Centre for Agricultural and Applied Economics Science Faculty of Agricultural and Food Sciences and Environmental Management University of Debrecen
Endre Brydl
Department of Animal Hygiene Faculty of Veterinary Science Szent István University in Budapest.
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APA

Gudaj, R., Komlósi, I., & Brydl, E. (2010). Study of animal welfare status and heat stress measures applied in dairy cow herds in Hungary. Acta Agraria Debreceniensis, (I), 79–82. https://doi.org/10.34101/ACTAAGRAR/I/8380

The following material focuses on dairy production and climate related issues in Hungary. All the data was gathered during PhD
project: Study of animal welfare status in dairy cow herds in Hungary. Relations between animal welfare and climate changes expressed by
increase in temperature are described. Extremely hot weather creates hard conditions for milking cows when animal welfare is highly
compromised. From the preliminary results obtained one might formulate hypothesis that there are still areas on the farms where immediate
actions should be taken to give a relief to cows in hot seasons. There was found significant number of farms with too many animals per one
water trough, dirty water troughs, limited access to water troughs and hazardous surface for cows in critical places where many animals are
gathered. Calves with not sufficient amount of water in hot days and other parts of the year were reported. Silage exposure to the sun and
mouldy food in a silage clump was also found to be an important factor in monitoring impact of warm weather. Half of the farms letting
animals to spend time on the pasture or paddock did not provide shade for animals. Low conception rate of first insemination was predicted
to be influenced by heat stress, what is proved by lack of heat decreasing measures taken on the farms.

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