No. 14 (2004)
Articles

The Effect of Grazing Intensities on Magnesium Contents

Published September 22, 2004
Levente Czeglédi
Debreceni Egyetem Agrártudományi Centrum, Mezőgazdaságtudományi Kar, Állattenyésztés- és Takarmányozástani Tanszék, Debrecen
Zoltán Győri
Debreceni Egyetem Agrártudományi Centrum, Mezőgazdaságtudományi Kar, Élelmiszertudományi és Minőségbiztosítási Tanszék, Debrecen
Béla Kovács
Debreceni Egyetem Agrártudományi Centrum, Mezőgazdaságtudományi Kar, Élelmiszertudományi és Minőségbiztosítási Tanszék, Debrecen
József Prokisch
Debreceni Egyetem Agrártudományi Centrum, Mezőgazdaságtudományi Kar, Élelmiszertudományi és Minőségbiztosítási Tanszék, Debrecen
Béla Béri
Debreceni Egyetem Agrártudományi Centrum, Mezőgazdaságtudományi Kar, Állattenyésztés- és Takarmányozástani Tanszék, Debrecen
pdf

APA

Czeglédi, L., Győri, Z., Kovács, B., Prokisch, J., & Béri, B. (2004). The Effect of Grazing Intensities on Magnesium Contents. Acta Agraria Debreceniensis, (14), 8-13. https://doi.org/10.34101/actaagrar/14/3361

Research was carried out on two areas of grassland in Hortobágy National Park, Hungary. Two herds of Hungarian Grey Cattle were kept in free range grazing and the effects of grazing pressure on the magnesium content of soil and ryegrass (Lolium perenne L) were determined.
Changes of plant available and total soil magnesium content under different grazing intensities did not show any evident tendency on the investigated grasslands. Different amounts of cattle faeces, urine and trampling had no effect on the magnesium concentration of ryegrass. We conclude that the magnesium content of ryegrass on both grassland sites as moderate grazing and overgrazing matches the requirements of cattle. Symptoms of magnesium deficiency of cattle will likely not appear.

Downloads

Download data is not yet available.