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Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus L.): A review of in vivo and in vitro propagation
Published September 7, 2014
131-136.

Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus L.) is an old tuber crop with a recently renewed interest in multipurpose improvement. It is a perennial tuberous plant rich in inulin and is a potential energy crop. During food shortages in times of war Jerusalem artichoke received more attention by scientists and farmers because of its multiple uses ...as a vegetable, medicinal plant, forage plant and source for biofuel. The energy crisis of the 1970s motivated research on Jerusalem artichoke for biofuel as the aboveground plant biomass and the tubers can be used for this purpose. There are different methods to propagate Jerusalem artichoke using tubers, rhizomes, slips (transplants derived from sprouted tubers), stem cuttings, seeds and tissue culture. So, this review was presented to highlight on propagation of Jerusalem artichoke via in vivo and in vitro techniques.

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In vitro comparative study of two Arundo donax L. ecotypes’ selenium tolerance
Published September 7, 2014
119-122.

Selenium tolerance of two somatic embryo-derived Arundo donax L. ecotypes (Blossom, 20SZ) were compared in in vitro culture. Sodium-selenate (1 – 100 mg L-1) as known the most phytoavailable selenium form and the less studied red elemental nanoselenium (100 mg L-1) were applied as selenium treatments. Basis on the results Blossom ecotype seem...ed to be more sensitive to the sodium-selenate than 20SZ. Inhibiting effect of selenate was effectuated above 10 mg L-1 in case of Blossom, which was manifested in decreased survival rate and growing parameters. Contrast to this 20SZ could tolerate the selenate ≤ 20 mg L-1 without any toxic symptoms. Lower selenate tolerance of Blossom could be explained with higher selenium accumulation. Both of two ecotypes could also uptake and accumulate the red elemental nanoselenium however in much less extent compared to selenate.

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Selenium enriched vegetables as biofortification alternative for alleviating micronutrient malnutrition
Published April 22, 2014
75-81.

There is a very difficult equation for malnutrition and over-consumption. That means malnutrition even of vitamins and/or minerals (Ca, Cu, Fe, I, Mg, Se and Zn, vitamin A) affects more than two billion people worldwide, largely due to low concentrations or poor bioavailability of the nutrients in the diet. In some developed countries in contra...st, over-consumption, particularly of over-refined cerealbased foods, has contributed to the development of an epidemic of metabolic diseases. So, producing nutritious and safe foods sufficiently and sustainably is important target at the same time challenge of modern agriculture. In the past, great efforts have focused only on increasing crop yields, but enhancing the concentrations of mineral micronutrients has become an urgent task. The main daily food source is the staple crops specially in developing countries of the world, i.e., wheat, rice, cassava, beans, sweet potato or maize. These kind of plants are often deficient in some of mineral elements. Thus, the increasing of bioavailable concentration of micronutrients in edible crop tissues (via biofortification) has become a promising strategy in modern agriculture, providing more nutritious foods, to more people, with the use of fewer lands. Biofortification of these trace elements can be achieved application with agronomic process such as soil or foliar fertilization or crop breeding even conventional technic and/or genetic engineering. This review highlight progress to date and identify challenges faced in delivering biofortified vegetable crops as well as the agronomic approaches and tools to improve crop yield and micronutrient content of food crops.

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