Search



Show Advanced search options Hide Advanced search options
S-locus genotyping on stone fruits in Hungary: a review of the most recent achievements
Published April 22, 2014
39-43.

Central Europe can be taken as a geographical and historical connection zone between the western growing countries and Asian gene centres of Prunus tree fruits. The determination of the S-genotype of stone fruit (mainly almond, plum, cherries and apricot) cultivars and landraces has both practical and theoretical significance. Our group has all...ocated complete S-genotypes for more than 200 cultivars and selections of almond, Japanese plum, sweet cherry and apricot. Among Eastern European almond cultivars, two novel cross-incompatibility groups (CIGs) were identified. S-alleles of a related species were also shown in P. dulcis accessions; a fact seems to be indicative of introgressive hybridization. Our results with Japanese plum clarified and harmonized two different allele nomenclatures and formed a basis for intensive international studies. In apricot, a total of 13 new S-alleles were identified from Eastern European and Asian accessions. Many Turkish and North African cultivars were classified into new CIGs, III–XVII. Results suggest that the mutation rendering apricot self-compatible might have occurred somewhere in south-east of Turkey and we were successful to confirm the presumed Irano-Caucasian origin of North African apricots based on the geographical distribution of S-alleles. In sweet cherry, new alleles have been identified and characterized from Turkish cultivars and selections. In addition, wild sweet cherry and sour cherry S-alleles were also shown indicating a a broader gene pool in Turkey as compared with international cultivars. We also used S-genotype information of Ukrainian sweet cherry cultivars to design crosses in a functional breeding program. Our results exhibit an increased number of S-alleles in tree fruit accessions native to the regions from Eastern Europe to Central Asia, which can be used to develop S-genotyping methods, to assist cultivation and draw inferences for crop evolution.

Show full abstract
129
165
Determination of (in)compatibility genotypes of Hungarian sweet cherry (Prunus avium L.) accessions by PCR based methods
Published October 20, 2003
37-42.

Sweet cherries (Prunus avium L.) are generally self-incompatible and pollinator cultivars are needed in orchards for reliable yield. In Hungary, choosing the appropriate cross-compatible cultivar pairs has so far been based on traditional test-crosses in the field. In recent years PCR-based methods that allow the identification of the ...S-alleles responsible for compatibility have been elaborated. We have determined the S-allele constitution of 24 cultivars and four selections important to Hungarian growers and breeders using PCR-based methods developed at Horticulture Research International, East Malling. The 28 accessions had various pairs of 9 alleles including one new allele, Sr. They could be assigned to 12 of the existing incompatibility groups or to a new group (S4S12) for which the designation 'Group XXVII' is proposed. The cultivars `Krupnoplodnaja' and 'Rita' had novel genotypes, S5S9 and S5Sx, respectively and can be placed into group 0 that holds universal pollen donors. The genotype of the cultivar ‘Hedelfingeni óriás' grown in Hungary was found to be S3S4 and therefore different from the cultivar `Hedelfingen' that is widespread in Western Europe.

Show full abstract
122
176
Preliminary characterization of the self-incompatibility genotypes of European plum (Prunus domestica L.) cultivars
Published September 7, 2014
23-26.

European plum is an important fruit crop with complex, hexaploid genome of unknown origin. The characterization of the selfincompatibility (S) locus of 16 European plum cultivars was carried out using the PaConsI-F primer in combination with the EM-PC1consRD primer for the first intron and the EM-PC2consFD and EM-PC3consRD primers for the secon...d intron amplification. Altogether, 18 different alleles were scored indicating high genetic diversity. These alleles were labelled using alphabetical codes from SA to SS. We  identified 5 different alleles in 9 cultivars, 4 alleles in 5 cultivars, while 3 alleles were shown in two of the assayed cultivars. A total of 16 different S-genotypes were assigned, and discrimination of all plum cultivars was successful based on their unique S-genotypes. However, further research is required to reliably identify the S-alleles based on their DNA sequence and clarify complete S-genotypes.

Show full abstract
145
153
Self-incompatibility in plums (Prunus salicina Lindl., Prunus cerasifera Ehrh. and Prunus domestica L.). A minireview
Published April 19, 2006
137-140.

Japanese plums (P salicina) and cherry plums (P cerasifera) are diploid species, while European plum (P. domestica) cultivars are hexaploids. Most diploid species are self-incompatible while fertility relations of the hexaploid European plums are variable between self-incompatibility and self-compatibility. A...bout twenty S-alleles and six inter-incompatibility groups and one S-haplotype responsible for the self-fruitful phenotype were described in Japanese plum cultivars, but studies on cherry plums and even on the European plum cultivars are severely restricted. This review is focused on the available information obtained from myrobalans and European plums; and discusses recent hypotheses regarding the putative origin of the hexaploid plums, and thereby indicates the possibility of allele flow between different plum species.

Show full abstract
297
326
Self-incompatibility in pears (Pyrus communis L., Pyrus serotina Rehd. and Pyrus ussuriensis) Review
Published April 19, 2006
87-91.

Self-incompatibility system and allele pool of three different pear species, European pear (Pyrus communis), Japanese pear (P. serotina) and Chinese pear (P ussuriensis) are displayed. Several inconsistencies and the absence of the harmonization of three different allele series are revealed i...n the European pears. By collecting data from several reports eight incompatibility groups of Japanese pear cultivars could be established. A self-compatible genotype is analysed in details and shown to be a stylar-part mutant. As Japanese pear was the first fruit tree species from which S-ribonucleases were identified, the history of S-genotyping from the beginning to the latest achievements and technical developments can be also monitored from the experiments enumerated. In Chinese pears, seven S-alleles and one incompatibility group could be identified.

Show full abstract
122
172
Review of the self-incompatibility in apple (Malus x domestica Borkh., syn.: Malus pumila Mill.)
Published April 19, 2006
31-36.

Apple (Malus x domestica Borkh.) is one of the most important fruit crops showing ribonuclease-mediated self-incompatibility, and no self-compatible apple cultivars are known. Twenty-nine S-alleles were identified in apple and many more incompatibility groups are present compared to sweet cherry. Results from a Belgian, Englis...h and a Japanese research group are combined and the S-genotypes of the most important world cultivars are collected. Two different allele labelling system are reconciled and detection methods used in case of the specific alleles are shown. Effects of the resistance breeding programmes are discussed; and scientific efforts involving transgenic technology to create self-compatible genotypes are shown. This review covers the most interesting issues regarding self-incompatibility in apple.

Show full abstract
281
348
Genotyping Hungarian apricot cultivars for self-(in)compatibility by isoelectric focusing and PCR analysis
Published March 14, 2005
69-72.

Self-incompatibility (SI) in flowering plants is a widespread genetic system that promotes out-crossing. In Prunus species the SI is a gametophytic trait, which is controlled by a single multiallelic locus, termed S-locus. S-alleles codify stylar glycoproteins with ribonuclease activity (S-RNases). Our objective was to assess the S-genotype of ...some Hungarian apricot varieties by isoelectric focusing of stylar RNases as well as by PCR analysis using cherry consensus primers. Consensus primers amplified one or two bands of various sizes. Primers amplifying the 1st intron gained fragments the size of which ranged from 250 to 500 bp; while those amplifying the 2nd intron resulted in fragments of 800-2000 by length. Our data demonstrated that the first intron of the apricot S-RNase gene is shorter than the second one, which coincides with the structure of cherry S-RNase alleles. `Hargrand' (S1S2) and `Harcoe (S1S4) possessed one common S-RNase isoenzyme. Hungarian 'Orias' apricot cultivars showed different bands compared to the previous cultivars, but they shared completely identical patterns confirming that they possess the same S-genotype. 'Bergeron', `Harmat' and 'Korai zamatos' are characterised by an evidently distinct S-RNase pattern. The self-compatible cultivar (`Bergeron') had one allele, which suggests its correspondence to the Sc. Primers for the 2nd intron was unsuccessful in gaining fragments, which indicates that the 2nd intron in the Sc allele is too long to get any amplification. On the basis of our data, identities and differences were revealed in the S-allele constitution of some economically important Hungarian apricot cultivars at protein and DNA levels.

Show full abstract
112
148
1 - 7 of 7 items