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  • Study of Educational Motivation among Agricultural Managers
    161-170
    Views:
    92

    It is a priority for companies to utilise human resources as much as possible. The form and effectiveness of the utilisation of labour largely depends on how much the manager of the company and the human resource management area support and encourage labour to develop individually and work more efficiently – as far as the size of the company justifies and allows. Effective incentive methods have to be set and run. Training incentives will have to play an important part in the future.
    There has been no major difference between training incentives between managers and subordinates. Material incentives continue to be the key factor. For managers, exchange of information is currently a primary training incentive, as is the opportunity to meet other experts and exchange their ideas. Further, performance-related payment and bonuses applied jointly are also some material incentives. In the future, material incentives will gain in importance. For subordinates, the operation of material incentives is currently highly important as a training incentive. This is not expected to change in the future either, while expectations linked to quality work will strengthen.

  • The role of agriculture in regional development
    25-30
    Views:
    213

    Agriculture is the leading national economic sector of Hajdú-Bihar county. The proportion of employees in this sector and the share of pro ducts produced in this region is above the country average. The contribution of agriculture to the GDP is 6.3%, as opposed to the average value of the country (3.3%). Based on their primary activity, 8% of the enterprises in the county are classified as agricultural and forestry companies, while this proportion is only 5.3% in the whole country.

    Nearly three quarters (71.1%) of the sowing area is occupied by maize and other cereals, mainly wheat. This proportion is slightly more than the country average (69.2%). The proportional area of oil crops - including sunflower – and roughage is nearly the same as the country average. However, there is a significant difference in vegetable production. Due to the higher intensity of vegetable production, the area occupied by vegetables is three times the country average. 19.4% of the crop products, 23.5% of animal products and living animals, 25.8% of the income generated by production factors and 29.8% of net enterprise income of Hungary originates from the North Great Plain region.

    The facilitation of creating local markets, e.g. local public food supply, satisfying the needs of food trade with local goods, the necessary awareness raising actions, secondary and higher education of experts, as well as the more specific and targeted utilisation of development resources are agricultural development tasks.

  • Tools of promoting „energy-crops”
    47-52
    Views:
    68

    The utilisation of renewable energy sources have come to front with the decreasing fossil fuel stocks, the unsolved problems and fears of nuclear energy and so the cumulating energy dependence. In Hungary the potential of biomass is the largest in renewable energy sources.
    During our examinations, we analysed the promotion of producing energy crops in Szabolcs-Szatmár-Bereg county. With the examination of the territories involved in energy crop subsidies it can be stated that the energy crop subsidy had its promoting role only on those areas where because of the bad soil conditions the energy crop producing is more profitable than other alternative (non energy) crops.
    The expected growth rate of energy plantations will be low, according to the low rate of subsidy intensity (40-60%). The uncertainty of direct area payments decreases the calculability that cuts back the favour of investment in short rotation forestry planting.

  • Spent mushroom compost (SMC) – retrieved added value product closing loop in agricultural production
    185-202
    Views:
    966

    Worldwide edible mushroom production on agro-industrial residues comprises of more than 11 million tons of fresh mushrooms per year. For 1 kg of mushrooms there is 5 kg of spent mushroom compost (SMC). This enormous amount of waste results in disposal problems. However, SMC is a waste product of the mushroom industry, which contains mycelium and high levels of remnant nutrients such as organic substances (N, P, K). The spent mushroom compost is usually intended for utilization, but there are increasing numbers of experiments focusing on its reuse in agricultural and horticultural production. Recently, the increase of the global environmental consciousness and stringent legislation have focused research towards the application of sustainable and circular processes. Innovative and environmentally friendly systems of utilisation of waste streams have increased interest of the scientific community. Circular economy implies that agricultural waste will be the source for retrieving high value-added compounds. The goal of the present work was to carry out a bibliographic review of the different scenarios, regarding the exploitation of this low cost feedstock with huge potential for valorisation.

  • Biological potential of plant pathogenic fungi on weeds: A mini-review essay
    59-66
    Views:
    61

    The invasion of weeds into productive areas has substantial negative effects on native ecosystems as well as agricultural production systems globally. Consequently, the task of maintaining or restoring these systems will become increasingly challenging without consistent, ongoing management efforts. The intensifying emergence of herbicide resistance in numerous weed species, coupled with the unintended pollution caused by synthetic herbicides, underscores the growing necessity for alternative, environmentally friendly, and sustainable management techniques, such as the utilisation of bioherbicides. Plant pathogenic microbes play an important role in biologically management of weeds, with the utilization of plant pathogenic fungi emerging as a promising area of study for novel research trends aimed at weed management without reliance of herbicides and to mitigate environmental pollution. A potential solution to decreasing pesticide usage involves the development of bioherbicides containing fungal active ingredients. Among the most commonly utilised fungi in bioherbicides are genera like Alternaria, Colletotrichum, Cercospora, Fusarium, Phomopsis, Phytophthora, Phoma, and Puccinia. Increased weed resistance to herbicides has influenced new strategies for weed management, with some fungi from genera such as Colletotrichum and Phoma already employed for weed control. Nonetheless, it is evident from reviews that further research is imperative in this domain, with particular emphasis on analysing the efficacy of each plant pathogenic fungi.

  • Competitiveness of the biomethane opposite with the CHP technology of biogas by definite plant size
    5-9
    Views:
    122

    The biogas sector has never before aroused so much attention as it does today. Combined heat and power (CHP) reliable and cost-effective technologies that are already making an important contribution to meeting global heat and electricity demand. Due to enhanced energy supply efficiency and utilisation of waste heat renewable energy resources, CHP, particularly together with district heating and cooling (DHC), is an important part of national and regional Green House Gas (GHG) emission reduction strategies.

    During my work I am going to use the basic data of a certain biogas plant than I assemble one model from that. Against the CHP technology I am going to plan a biogas cleaning-equipment. During my research it revealed, that in the case of a 1 MW output power plant it is not worthy to deal with biogas cleaning between national conditions. Investigating the quantity of heat recovery in the CHP technology it is obvious, that the net income at 1 m3 biogas is at least 72 times more than the cleaning technology (heat recovery is 0%).

  • Correlations Between the Crown Sizes, Pruning Times and Fruit Quality of Sour Cherry Cultivars
    90-94
    Views:
    158

    To increase the intensiveness of sour cherry production, i.e. the use of smaller trees, it is necessary to adopt growth-moderating techniques rather than using dwarfing rootstocks. Apart from the traditional technique of using rootstocks that support stronger growth, new or rarely-used techniques and methods must be adopted. Pruning should be carried out in the summer rather than in the winter, the optimal period being 1-3 weeks after harvest.
    A combination of the increase in favourable exposure-time and smaller crown sizes make higher tree densities (tree/ha) and better utilisation of the crown (specific cropload) possible.
    The systematic use of summer pruning leads to better quality fruit.

  • Renewable energy on animal farms: support system and practical application
    13-17
    Views:
    152

    Renewable energy applications were examined in animal farms. The investment support system for animal farms – which has renewable elements – has been summarized through analyzing the legislation and future prospects. The most important in this topic is the Animal Farm Modernization Support, which had several application periods during the 2007–2013 CAP budgets. For analyzing practical application of renewable energies interviews and farm visits have done in Hajdú-Bihar County. The questions covered the general attributes of the farms and the details of the (existing or planned) renewable energy application. In terms of economic analysis saving, the investment return time and the employment effect were examined. The results show wide variety of applied renewable energy application. The investment supports plays great role in renewable energy projects by lowering the return time; and through additional points in application assessing, which is an incentive for farmers to include renewable energy element in their modernization projects.

  • Circumstances of the establishment of the Eastern Main Channel, water utilisation problems and alternatives
    79-84
    Views:
    99

    After hundreds of years of drought in the area of Hortobágy and its surroundings brought up the idea of building a channel in Tiszántúl. It started with the idea of an irrigation canal but it ended up in a canal with high importance which can be used in many ways. Because of financial problems the necessary renovations cannot be achieved, and as a side effect the amount of silt in the water started to increase, water exploitation started to decrease, and the construction works started to get spoiled. Guided by the Water Directive the East Main Channel has become one of the most significant surface water base in Hungary. To use its water as drinking water brings up a few questions, like solving the pollution problems which problems have already occured. If we want the East Main Channel to be a solution for a long time, further steps and researches are needed to solve the problem of diverting the huge amount of precipitation of the last few years and miantaining the quality of drinking water.

  • Phosphorus (from Different Phosphorus Sources) Utilisation in Piglets, and the Effect of the Addition of Phytase into the Feedstuff
    30-36
    Views:
    71

    The experiments were carried out in a 2x2 factorial treatments with three replicates, and were completed with 32P phosphorus metabolism measurement. Hungarian Large White x Dutch Landrace growing pigs with 15–18 kg starting live weight were involved in the experiment.
    The experimental scheme was the following:

    Diet consisted of maize and extracted soybean meal. Both components have high phytase content and low phytase activity. 1/a animals received their P-supply according to their needs and 1/b animals got 10% less than their actual P-need in the first part of the experiment.
    In the second part of the experiment both groups (2/a, 2/b) received identical P-supply and 500FTU/kg P supplementation. Apart from P- and phytase-supplementation, the piglets’ diet was identical.
    Total P digestibility was 52% without phytase supplementation, which increases by 4% when P was added according to need and by 12% increase of decreased P-supply. Digestibility of nutrients somewhat increased as effect of phytase supplementation. According to the results of 32P experiments, inorganic P digestibility of MCP was 82–90.8%, which decreases to 73.4–87.2% in case of phytase supplementation.
    Parallel with tendency, native P digestibility of the diet was 31.5–32.2%, which increased to 42.5–54.5% in the case of phytase supplementation.
    Results support the that inorganic P input can be decreased by phytase supplementation and as a consequence P output, the concept and environmental pollution can at the some time be decreased.

  • Comparative examination of the tillage systems of maize on meadow chernozem soil
    21-24
    Views:
    167

    Maize production plays a major role in the agriculture of Hungary. Maize yields were very variable in Hungary in the last few decades. Unpredictable purchase prices, periodical overproduction, the increasing occurrence of weather extremities, the uncertain profit producing ability, the soil degradation processes (physical, chemical and biological degradation) and the high expenses are risk factors for producers. Due soil tillage, there is an opportunity to reduce these risks. Based on the experimental database of the Institute of Land Utilisation, Regional Development and Technology of the University of Debrecen, Centre for Agricultural and the KITE Plc., various cultivation systems were examined with maize (Zea mays L.) as indicator plant in Jász-Nagykun-Szolnok country in 2012 and 2013. The sample area can be found in the outskirts of Kenderes on a meadow chernozem soil. On the examined plot, strip-tillage, subsoiling and moldboard ploughing were performed, each on 4.5 ha, respectively.

    In general, our findings show, that strip-tillage and subsoiling can be alternative tillage systems beside moldboard ploughing on meadow chernozem soils in Hungary.

  • Landscape use of protected areas in the Hódmezővásárhely micro-region
    179-193
    Views:
    89

    One of the biggest questions of developing rural areas is that people and organisations living and making their activity there how and in what measure utilize the local or obtainable external
    resources. The concept of the landscape expresses the direct connection of the natural resources with the socio-economic processes. This is a two-way connection, (1) on the one hand the single landscapes provide the unique combination of natural conditions for the socio-economic utilisation which is different from other landscapes, (2) on the other hand as the result of the interaction of natural spheres together with the social and economic spheres the landscapes change in a different manner and in a different measure. The landscape as a territorial unit and as a resource is inseparable from the natural resources, and the nature
    conservation plays an increasingly important role in the use of the landscape and landscape management, which is an essential task not only in protected areas, but everywhere. The natural resources, the landscape, the nature conservation and the landscape use are related tightly, in which the so-called ecological/biological resources and their sustainable use have a
    significant role. 

  • Effect of compost/water ratio on some main parameter of compost solutions
    117-121
    Views:
    232

    Composting is an efficient technology for the utilisation of by-products and waste. It is also suitable for treating raw materials to convert fertilisers that are not recommended for application without pre-processing. Such is the case with poultry manure, which is very important to pre-treat due to its hazardous properties. An increasingly common form of compost is compost tea, which is made by soaking compost in water. In our experiment, we made compost tea from a composted and granulated poultry manure product. Three mixing ratios were used (1/5, 1/10, 1/10) and compost teas were set for three different extraction times (24–48–72 hours). After elimination of the experiment, the pH, EC, and nitrate and ammonium contents of the samples were measured. The aim of this study was to determine whether there is a difference between each mixing ratio and different extraction times. Based on our results, it can be said that the fluctuation of pH values during the experiment was low. Regardless of the mixing ratio and extraction time, the samples were in the slightly acidic range. The electrical conductivity, nitrate and ammonium content follow a similar trend, the values decrease significantly with the increase of the mixing ratio. Similar tendency was observed at the incubation time. The concentrations of both EC and nitrogen forms increase with increasing incubation time, in most cases significantly.

  • Vegetable production based on waste heat in closed greenhouses considering economic usage and competitiveness of the European Union
    41-44
    Views:
    117

    The study investigates two professional fields; the questions of vegetable production in greenhouses, the necessary steam supply and heat regulations. The actuality of this investigation is provided by the planning of a combined cycle power plant of 2400 MW in Hungary. According to the plans the steam developing by generating electricity in the power plant can be used to intensify the vegetable production. In my current study I present the experiences and results gathered as member of the research and development team led by Mr. Dr. Sinórós-Szabó.

  • Regional Development Differences in Hungary and the Northern-Great Plain Region
    62-71
    Views:
    132

    The most important endeavour of European Union’s regional policy is to moderate disparities. An emphasised strategic objective of member states, based on the principle of solidarity, fairness and justice, is to develop regions and almost forty percent of the common budget is devoted to achieving this objective.
    Hungary, as a full EU member state, will get a new chance for underdeveloped regions, especially for the Eastern-Hungarian as well as the North Hungarian and North Plain Region.
    The differences in development among the regions are significantly influenced by the economic characteristics of the specific region, quality and quantity of human resources, accessability of the region and other factors influencing local quality of life beside natural conditions.
    The new spatial structure was formed by change of regime, processes of the nineties, primarily the economic renewal based on foreign capital investments and the crisis phenomena in parallel with these. The economic, political and social consequences of the transformation significantly changed spatial structure and increased disparities. New disparities formed which were further aggravated as a consequence due to the formation of the eastern-western slope and local crisis zones. As a result of the outstanding development of the capital, the long term differentiation of regional development differences can also be detected when examining the regional distribution of Hungarian gross domestic product. The collapse of heavy industry and agricultural mass production based on the eastern markets primarily affected the north-east counties in the eastern part of the country.
    Strengthening regional competitiveness is of key importance for the region, which requires the application of consistent development policy. The most important is economic development which, if it operates well, also infers the possibility of establishing welfare infrastructures. Drawing in external sources to ease the significant lack of capital is important for the processing industry and the development of supplier networks. Agricultural development also plays an important role in transforming economic structure, since the characteristics of the region, its traditions and long term competitive advantages are favourable, therefore it is going to represent a higher ratio within the economy than the EU average. The modernisation of the agricultural sector can be promoted by supporting market accession, quality agricultural production and stimulating producer-retailer cooperation. The development of transportation and informatics infrastructure as well as human resource development plays a significantly important role in the development of the region.
    In conclusion, the implementation of such a consistent regional development policy is required in the future, based on the strengths of the region, that serves the most efficient utilisation of regional development funds through the implementation of regional policy principles and prevents the irreversible decay of the region while promoting rapid development.

  • Origin, history and utilization possibilities of Carpathian Braunvieh at Hungary
    15-20
    Views:
    184

    The Carpathian Braunvieh was established by the cross-breeding of Braunvieh and the small dun mountain breeds of the Carpathian basin. It has been breeding in Hungary about 100 years before and still living in Transcarpathia and Transylvania, but only in very mixed populations. Since it was a characteristic native cattle breed of the country, it should be retain for future generations and re-establish in Hungary. Our primary aim is to preserve the breed’s genetic resources and - if appropriate - to acclaim it as an indigenous breed. If there are no longer residuals of the old type Carpathian Braunvieh, it is still worth to preserve as a local variety, because of its many favourable features. Above all, it’s our duty to maintain the breed, because neither Transcarpathia nor Transylvania has a breeding programme for it.

  • Economic Assessment of Biodiesel Production for Hungarian Farmers
    72-76
    Views:
    77

    Utilisation of oil of plant origin as a fuel is gaining acceptance in the European Union and elsewhere. Besides environmental protection, energy saving, and decreasing over-production of food. Additionally, the subsidisation of farmers and the development of rural sub-regions also contribute to its spread. This study specifically focuses on the direct effects biodiesel's raw materials and final products are now having on farmers, while reviewing and quantifying these effects. I have purposely restricted my analysis to these two elements of the biodiesel chain.
    The biodiesel chain seems to be a great method for improving the economic and social position of participant farmers in many ways. Presently, the profitability of raw materials’ production looks to be the crucal point in the chain, and could be strengthened best with intensive, habitat-specific agrotechnic. It would only be possible to reach a favourable profit margin for farmers if yields reach unrealistic averages or if there is a significant hike of the 2000 producer’s price in the oil plant branch.
    The main attraction of sunflower- and oilseed rape production lies in the stabilization of market conditions, which is not only gong to appear in oil plant branch but – thanks to the reduction of outputs – also in the cereal branches. Better economic safety for farmers may play a role at least on the same level as in plant production, which involves more risks than profit maximalization.
    The reduction of the prime cost of biodiesel could be possible through the direct combustion of the whole oilseed plant or its residues or electricity production using them. Whereas energy demand for biodiesel production is low (appr. 5%) but it needs subsidization and the prices of natural gas and electrical energy presently look favourable in Hungary. Additionally harvesting and baling of the residues is technically problematic, which is why their use may seem to be reasonable just over the middle or long term. Another possible factor of cost reduction could be the centralization of some partial operations, which needs serious financial resources to reduce amortization cost per product, provided there be several biodiesel projects near each other during establishment. Creation and operation of a logistical system could also be a good method for improving the viability of the biodiesel chain, in order to optimize transport schedule and distances. However there are also some organizational difficulties in this case.

  • Renewable energy strategy in Hungary
    101-104
    Views:
    137

    The price of energy determinates our daily life. It is very necessary that we make energy strategy such as effective in everyday life, furthermore appoint a predictable development path. In these energy strategies the renewable energy and the energy efficiency is highlighted. This article describes about relevant pledges from recent years and possible improvements.

  • The analysing of value measuring features of Hungarian speckled hen
    17-23
    Views:
    40

    Our College has been dealing with the crossbreeding of two Hungarian speckled hen breeds, the bare-neck and the featheredneck, to maintain the breeds since 1977. Apart from the gene preservation, we endeavour to find the best way for the production-purpose utilisation of the speckled hen stock. On the basis of our experiments the laying hens can be used in small-scale egg production. As for meat production, these pure-breds cannot compete with the various types of the colour-feathered hybrid constructions available in Hungary. On the basis of the results of the cross-breeding with cock-lines of various hybrid types for direct production purposes we can conclude that the Hungarian speckled hen is suitable as a mother line to produce meat-type chickens in alternative breeding systems.

  • Nutrient and water utilisation analyses of maize on chernozem soil in a long-term field experiment
    77-82
    Views:
    182

    We have conducted our research at the Látókép Research Farm of the University of Debrecen RISF Centre for Agricultural and Applied Economic Sciences during the cropyears of 2007, 2008 and 2009, on chernozem soil. In the case of crop rotation three models were set (mono-,bi- [wheat, maize] and triculture [pea, wheat, maize]). The five nutrient levels applied during the treatments were as follows: control [untreated], N60P45K45, N120P90K90, N180P135K135, N240P180K180. The conclusion of our results was the following: the crop rotation, the nutrient supply and the amount of precipitation all influenced the quantity of maize yield. As an effect of the increasing nutrient doses yield increase was experienced compared with the control treatments. In the average of the years the highest increase in yield excess/1 kg of NPK fertilizer was measured in the case of the monoculture (13 kg ha-1). As a consequence of is soil extorting effect the monoculture responded more intensively to the nutrient supplementation than the biculture or the triculture in the studied cropyears. In addition, we have observed that the three-year average yield amount per 1 mm precipitation was significantly influenced by the nutrient reserve of the soil. In the monoculture during the control treatment this value was 25 kg mm-1, the value measured in the case of the biculture turned out to be more favourable (42 kg mm-1).

  • Selection of Sport- and Racehorses
    3-10
    Views:
    99

    The utilisation of the horse has changed from time to time in response to human needs. For a few decades, it has been serving in several equestrian sports more intensively. It has also been proved that the standards for this kind of performance cannot be established in the way certain characteristics, such as the weight gain or milk production of other animal breeds can. Breeding horses for sporting comprises highly complex selection criteria.
    Some of these (e.g. external features, temperament, manageability and intelligence) do not put the breeder in a difficult position, but finding the traits that establishes the safety of sporting achievements poses a genetic problem.
    The performance of a horse for sports is a highly complex feature, which cannot easily be assessed or put down in figures. In addition, man plays a decisive role in shaping all kinds of performance of a horse at any given time by not only creating conditions for a better performance, but also by playing an active role in increasing it.
    The performance of the horse is mostly defined by its general aptitude to movement, ie., the regularity, clear rhythm and springiness of basic types of strides, as well as the ability to move in a naturally balanced way. Training and riding principles are based on these traits. These two together will determine about 70% of the value of the horse and its adequacy for high performance equestrian sports. In order to avoid subjectivity in determining the above variables and to increase the degree of objectivity, competent expert teams (trainers, judges, other riders) are employed to form an opinion on an individual animal.
    Assessing horse performance outside races does not seem to be efficient, as owing to the dominant effects of the environment, the indicator of inheritability is hardly above 0.1.
    Free jumping is an especially appropriate means for assessing a horse’s readiness and ability to move in an environment free of disturbing factors. In free jumping, it is especially important to judge the style of the jump. The first phase of jumping – as a sequence of movements – lasts from the moment the fore-feet touch the ground until the moment the hind-feet push off, while the second phase lasts from this moment until touching the ground. The most important task in the first phase is to make the angle of the dip of the body by the supporting fore-feet that is necessary for the jump. The quality of the jump is determined by the jumping and adequately expanded hind-legs. The intensity of pushing off and jumping done by the hind-legs can be inferred, and differences between individuals can be discerned from the shaping of the curve by the hocks and the paths of the pasterns in relation to the withers.

  • Objectives of the EU in the field of biomass use and utilisation
    9-12
    Views:
    113

    The energy independence very important for the European Union, while simultaneously sparing the natural environment in order to increase the use of renewable energy sources . A further development is the key issue of how renewable energy sources available can be better utilized to improve the efficiency of economic competitiveness. EU renewable energy policy is determined by five principles : The first is the environment, including the carbon dioxide and other pollutants to reduce emissions . The second increase energy security and at the same time reducing dependence on imports. The third aspect of local and regional development. With this realignment of economic and social development levels of different areas they want to achieve. This point is closely related to rural development and create new jobs . The transformation of the agricultural structure is an important aspect , which is that they can reduce the overproduction of food by providing alternative land use options , such as the cultivation of energy crops.

  • Applicability of reflectance to determine compost maturity
    31-35
    Views:
    123

    The utilisation of composts depends on their maturity and stability. A great part of the determination methods can be set in laboratory and needs complicated sample preparation. The aim of this paper was introduce an effective and fast method which based on the different reflectance of the different organic compounds.
    During our research we examined the degradation process of compost prisms based on sewage sludge, wood-clipping and straw with temperature and reflectance measurements.
    As a result, we came to the conclusion that the reflectance, measured at 645 nm or higher, is applicable to determine compost maturity if it is used with temperature measurements.

  • The Evaluation of Grazed Grasslands on the Hortobágy
    50-54
    Views:
    117

    The sward composition of different grasslands on Puszta Hortobágy has been developed according to prevailing abiotic and biotic factors. The abiotic conditions have been more or less constans for long periods of time, and the abiotic factors are determined by ecological conditions (climate, soil, topography). Among biotic factors grazing of herbivores was important in the development of Hortobágy grasslands for centuries (Sipos and Varga, 1993). Result of three-year investigations on the sward composition of grasslands utilised in different ways are presented. Data on ground cover, number of plant species, representation of different plant groups (grasses, sedge and bent-grass, herbs, legumes) and weeds are reported from six different grazed grassland types from Puszta Hortobágy.
    In 1999-2001 a sward composition survey was conducted. Sample areas of 2x2 m2 were marked out in three replicates: on temporarily waterlogged grassland grazed by cattle (A), on dry grassland grazed by cattle (B), on dry grassland grazed by sheep (C), on dry grassland grazed by buffaloes (D), on dry grassland grazed by buffaloes and geese (E), on dry grassland cut for hay in May then grazed by geese (F). On the sample areas sward composition of grasslands was estimated according to Balázs (1949).
    The average ground cover of different grasslands ranged between 60 and 100% (Table 2). The lowest value was found for grasslands C and E, which are grazed by sheep (C) and buffaloes and geese alternately (E). In these grasslands were some open spaces, on the other grasslands completely closed swards covers were observed.
    The species diversity of these natural grasslands are high (Table 2). The grassland F, which were cut for hay in May had the lowest diversity (17-21). The highest number of species was found on grassland A and B (32-51), on other grazed grasslands (C, D, E) had 29-48 species.
    The different plant groups had different representation in the total ground cover (Table 3). The number of herbs was always higher then that of grasses, but the cover of herbs was lower then that of grasses. The legumes and the sedge and bent grasses were present in high abundance in grassland A, but in the other grasslands were not.
    The composition of herbs should be a warning for future utilisation systems on some grasslands of Hortobágy. Some species of herbs, e.g. Achillea millefolium, Artemisia vulgaris, Carduus acanthoides, Cirsium arvense, Cirsium vulgare Eryngium campestre, Galium mollugo, Galium verum, Ononis spinosa, Rumex crispus, Verbascum phlomoideus, Phragmites australis can be invasive on short grasslands.

  • The egg production of hungarian speckled hen and speckled transylvanian naked neck hen
    11-15
    Views:
    80

    Our Faculty has been dealing with the cross-breeding of Hungarian speckled hen to maintain the breed since 1977. We keep two breeds of the Hungarian speckled hen, the bare-neck variant and the feathered-neck type on the pilot farm. Because of the spread of intensive poultry keeping the population of these breeds has become endangered. Beside the gene preservation, we endeavour to find the best way for the production-purpose
    utilisation of the speckled hen stock. We examined the egg production of these breeds.