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Storage ability and differences of carrot varieties defined by firmness changes measured with new non-destructive acoustic method
Published February 8, 2006
37-40.

Carrot production in Hungary is getting more important these days. The condition of the quality insurance is to choose the proper variety of carrot and store on optimal conditions therefore measuring firmness and matter parameters are very important. Four varieties of carrots were measured (Bangor, Olympus, Napa and I3olero). The roots were sto...red in unsealed polyethylene bags at 4-10 degrees Celsius and 95% relative humidity. The vegetables were measured three times: at harvest, after I .5 months of storage and after four months of storage. The samples were tested by non-destructive acoustic. Stillness measuring method during the 112 days experiment for firmness. In laboratory were measured weight loss, dry material -NO3 and sugar content as an important matter parameters.

The firmness change as a function of storage time are the following: First part of the storage (after 60 days), the Napa variety changed least in the case of acoustical parameter, at the same time its weight Foss and dry material content were not rise significantly, while its sugar content increased with 50%. The l3olero variety had the highest changes of sugar content during storage. During the second storage period, the softening speed of all samples was increased. The Bolero had the highest average mass loss (32,7%) and NO3 content changes as well. All measurements showed the largest changes for the Bolero variety. The highest percentage of dry material content was found by the Bolero and Napa varieties (18-20%).

In this experiment, we found that the Bolero variety showed the greatest loss in compressibility during storage. If both firmness and weight loss results are considered, the Napa variety is found to be the most storable variety in sort period. The Bangor variety was found to be the best for long-term storage.

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The brown rot fungi of fruit crops (Monilinia spp.): II. Important features of their epidemiology (Review paper)
Published March 16, 2004
17-33.

Plant disease epidemiology provides the key to both a better understanding of the nature of a disease and the most effective approach to disease control. Brown rot fungi (Monilinia spp.) cause mainly fruit rot, blossom blight and stem canker which results in considerable yield losses both in the field and in the storage place. In order... to provide a better disease control strategy, all aspects of brown rot fungi epidemiology are discribed and discussed in the second part of this review. The general disease cycle of Monilinia fructigena„M. laxa, M. fructicola and Monilia polystroma is described. After such environmental and biological factors are presented which influence the development of hyphae, mycelium, conidia, stroma and apothecial formation. Factors affecting the ability of brown rot fungi to survive are also demonstrated. Then spatio-temporal dynamics of brown rot fungi are discussed. In the last two parts, the epidemiology of brown rot fungi was related to disease warning models and some aspects of disease management.

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102
84
Changes in germination ability during genebank storage at some medicinal plant seeds belonging to the Solanaceae family
Published June 6, 2001
51-55.

In the present work we have examined the changes of germination ability of some medicinal plant species belonging to the Solanaceae family (Datura stramonium L., Datura innoxia Mill. and Hyoscyamus niger L.) during 5-6 years' storage period. According to our results, all the three species showed an after-ripe...ning behavior. Potassium nitrate and gibberellic acid increased significantly the rate of germination in the case of Datura species. During the storage period tested (1995-2001), the species maintained their germination ability which is favourably but not significantly influenced by the cooled gene bank conditions. The degree of ripeness affected considerably the proportion of germinated seeds at all the three species. As a consequence of our results we emphasise that propagation with completely ripe seeds is proposed, however, half-ripe seeds developped in an unadvantageous vegetation period can be also utilized in the practice. The effect of vegetation year on stramony seeds manifested in the length of after-ripening period, while in the case of henbane the germination ability was also influenced.

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