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The tissue structure of the vegetative organs of strawberry (Fragaria moschata Duch®)
Published February 23, 2000
28-31.

The tissue structure of the vegetative organs of strawberry (root, rhizome, stolon, leaf) is discussed in this paper. The authors stated that the root structure described by Muromcev (1969) and Naumann-Seip (1989) develops further from the primary structure. It grows secondarily and the transport tissue becomes continuous having ring shape. In ...the primary cortex of the rhizome periderm like tissue differentiates, but according to the examinations up to now, it does not take over the role of the exodermis. The exodermis is phloboran filled primary cortex tissue with 3-4 cell rows under the rhizodermis. The development of the transport tissue of the petiole is also a new recognition. In the lower third of the petiole the transport tissue consists of 3 collaterally compound vascular bundles. In the middle third there are 5 bundles because of the separation of the central bundle and in the upper third of the petiole 7 bundles can be observed because of the ramification of the outside bundles. Therefore attention must be taken also in the case of other plants at making sections. There might be confusions in the results of the examinations if the number of bundles increases in the petiole. The tissue structure might vary depending on the origin of the tissue segment.

The palisade parenchyma of the leaf blade has two layers and it is wider than the spongy parenchyma. Among the 5-6-angular cells of the upper epidermis do not develop stomata while in the lower epidermis there are a fairly lot of them.

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Anatomical relations of the leaves in strawberry
Published March 14, 2005
81-84.

In the present study histology of the leaves of strawberry (Fragaria ananassa Duch.) variety Elsanta was the objective, which has been performed with the beginning of seedling stage, cotyledons, primary leaves and later true leaves, first cataphyll of the runner shoot as well as the bracteoles of the inflorescence. Structures of the le...af blade, the upper and lower epidermis, the petiole have been also observed. The leaf blade of cotyledons already contains a typical palisade as well as spongy parenchyma tissues, i.e. being bifacial showing a structure similar to that of the true leaf. However, the petiole displays differences from the true leaf. There are a narrow (4-5 layer) primary cortex and a tiny central cylinder. Primary leaves bear already hairs on the adaxial surface and the transporting tissue-bundles are recognised in cross sections having a "V" shape. The first true leaf composed by three leaflets is of a simple structure showing characters reminding of cotyledons and primary leaves. Leaves of intermediate size continue to grow, whereas their inner anatomy changes dramatically. In the central region of the leaflets, near to the main vein, a second palisade parenchyma appears, further on, transporting tissue bundles are branching in the petiole. Collenchyma tissues enhance the stiffness and elasticity of the petiole. Older true leaves develop thick collenchyma tissues around the transporting bundles being represented by increasing numbers. The doubled palisade parenchyma layers of the leaf blades are generally observed. The cataphylls of the runners have a more simple structure, their mesophyll is homogenous, no palisade parenchyma appears. It is evident that leaves grown at successive developmental stages are different not only in their morphological but also anatomical structure. There is a gradual change according to the developmental stage of the leaves.

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The in vitro and in vivo anatomical structure of leaves of Prunus x Davidopersica ‘Piroska' and Sorbus rotundifolia L. ‘Bükk szépe'
Published May 24, 1999
92-95.

Immature in vitro leaves showed similar structure of the mesophyll tissue to the immature field-grown (in vivo) leaves of Prunus x davidopersica `Piroska'. Mature leaf anatomical characteristics of in vitro plantlets differ from the field-grown plants. The mesophyll tissue of in vitro plantlets were thinner than the in vivo plants and consisted... of only one layer palisade parenchyma, the shape of the cells and the structure of spongy parenchyma basically differed from the field-grown plants. In the case of Sorbus rotundifolia similar anatomical differences were found both in vitro and in vivo as in the case of Prunus x davidopersica `Piroska'.

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Evaluating vase life and tissue structure of some compositae (Asteraceae) species
Published June 24, 2003
87-89.

The vase life of cut flowers and effects of various chemicals was examined with the help of a pulse treatment. According to the results using of chemicals (preservatives, disinfectants as well as blocking of synthesis of ethylene) is ineffective if it is used after seeding This shows the great importance of harvesting time.

Using 8-HQS ...or l-MCP + 8-HQS proved to be the best for vase life in most of the samples. Using these materials did not prevent the appearance of air bubbles in the stems and absorption could be observed continuously.

To examine the tissue structure reaction of chemicals stems were stained with toluidin-blue, and high of absorption was measured. It was found that in cases, when absorption was bad, small air bubbles blocked the xylem vessels.

All the species examined (Aster linosyris, Achillea collina, Aster novi-belgii, Inula britannica, Solidago canadensis, Inula ensifolia, Senecio jacobea) show similar reactions to chemicals because they are the members of the same family.

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