Published After
Published Before
53-57.
Vol 11No 32005
Anatomic studies have been performed on the leaf blade, petiole and annual shoot on six apple cultivars by means of scanning electron as well as light microscope. Four of the cultivars examined are resistant to scab (Florina, Freedom, MR-10, MR-11), whereas two of them are susceptible (Jonathan and Idared). Preliminary results suggest that differe...nces in the width of cross sections of leaf blades, in hairyness, in the shape and size of epidermal cells, moreover, in the cross sections of petioles and shoots are considerable. Some of the anatomical properties seem to be correlated with scab resistance or susceptility of the respective cultivars. Therefore, further studies extending to other cultivars may corroborate our claims to find causal relations between anatomical traits of the leaves and disease, especially scab resistance of apple cultivars.
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83-85.
Vol 11No 22005
Investigations were done in order to obtain more information on the histological structure of bulbs of Allium moly, Allium sphaerocephalon, Muscari armeniacum and corms of Crocus sativus. While starch grain were found in the bulb of Muscari armeniacum, fluid nutrient content were shown in Allium species. Narrow and fleshy scales were found in the ...bulbs of Muscari. Histological characteristics of Allium moly and Allium sphaerocephalon showed a closer relationship with corms than with the bulbs. To clarify this question, further investigations are needed (Bailey, 1942; Larson, 1980).
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79-82.
Vol 11No 22005
Growing of native perennial species became more and more popular in the last ten years. In order to obtain more information on their histological structure, investigations were done on Aster linosyris, Inula ensifolia and Prunella grandiflora. The histological features are usually relating to the plants' ecological demands which is an important as...pect in their growing. Differences were found in the structure of the stem of Asteraceae and Lamiaceae members. While separated vessels were formed in the stem of Aster linosyris and Inula ensifolia, continuous vessel-system forms in the stem of Prunella. Alternating segments of collenchyma and chlorenchyma are found in the stem of Aster linosyris, while palisade parenchyma is situated both on the abaxial and adaxial surface of the leaves. Vessel-system of the root is tetrarch. Histological structure of the stem of Inula ensifolia differs from Aster linosyris in the broader cortical parenchyma which is composed of approx. 8-12 cell layers. It contains neither collenchyma nor chlorenchyma. In the stem of Prunella grandiflora a nearly continuous vessel-ring is formed from the four primary vessels. Long, multi-celled hairs were observed in the district of angles of the stem.
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In the present study histology of the leaves of strawberry (Fragaria ananassa Duch.) variety Elsanta was the objective, which has been performed with the beginning of seedling stage, cotyledons, primary leaves and later true leaves, first cataphyll of the runner shoot as well as the bracteoles of the inflorescence. Structures of the leaf blade, th...e upper and lower epidermis, the petiole have been also observed. The leaf blade of cotyledons already contains a typical palisade as well as spongy parenchyma tissues, i.e. being bifacial showing a structure similar to that of the true leaf. However, the petiole displays differences from the true leaf. There are a narrow (4-5 layer) primary cortex and a tiny central cylinder. Primary leaves bear already hairs on the adaxial surface and the transporting tissue-bundles are recognised in cross sections having a "V" shape. The first true leaf composed by three leaflets is of a simple structure showing characters reminding of cotyledons and primary leaves. Leaves of intermediate size continue to grow, whereas their inner anatomy changes dramatically. In the central region of the leaflets, near to the main vein, a second palisade parenchyma appears, further on, transporting tissue bundles are branching in the petiole. Collenchyma tissues enhance the stiffness and elasticity of the petiole. Older true leaves develop thick collenchyma tissues around the transporting bundles being represented by increasing numbers. The doubled palisade parenchyma layers of the leaf blades are generally observed. The cataphylls of the runners have a more simple structure, their mesophyll is homogenous, no palisade parenchyma appears. It is evident that leaves grown at successive developmental stages are different not only in their morphological but also anatomical structure. There is a gradual change according to the developmental stage of the leaves.
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71-75.
Vol 10No 32004
Anatomical relations of root formation are traced throughout the life cycle of the strawberry plant from the germinating seed up to the runners of the adult plant. Histological picture of the root changes a lot during the development of the plant. First the radicle of the germ grows to a main root, which makes branches into side roots and later ad...ventitious roots are formed on the growing rootstock or rhizome. The anatomy of the different types of roots is also conspicuously different. First tiny branches appear relatively early after germination on the seedling's radicle, but soon the hypocotyl of the seedling thickens and develops side roots, which are already somewhat stronger. During this interval, the first true leaves are formed. The 4th or 5th of them being already tripartite, and the initiation of new roots extends into the epicotylar region of the shoot. The second years growth starts with the development of reproductive structures, inflorescences and runners starting from the axils of the new leaves. Near the tips of the runners below the small bunch of leaves, new root primordia are initiated. The tiny radicle of the germ develops a cortical region of 5-6 cell layers. Cells of the central cylinder are even smaller than the cortical parenchyma and include 3-4 xylem and 3-4 phloem elements as representatives of the conductive tissue. Roots originating from the shoot region are much more developed; their cortical zone contains 17-20 cell layers, whereas the central cylinder is about half as large. In the next year, new roots are formed at the base of the older leaves. These roots differ hardly from those of the last season in size and volume, however, they are recognised by colour and their position on the rhizome. The roots of the last year are dark, greyish-black, and grow on the lower third length of the rhizome, on the contrary, the new ones, on the upper region, are light brown. Roots starting from the shoot or rhizome are, independently from their age or sequence, mainly rather similar in size and diameter, thus being members of a homogenous root (homorhizous) system, i.e. without a main root. Plants developed and attained the reproductive phase develop in the axils of the leaves runners being plagiotropic, i.e. growing horizontally on the surface of the soil. The runners elongate intensely, become 150-200 mm, where some long internodes bear a bunch of small leaves and root primordia on short internodes and a growing tip. Runners do not stop growing, generally, further sections of 15-25 cm length are developed according to the same pattern, with small leaves on the tip. The growing tip of the runners is obliquely oriented, and small, conical root primordia are ready to start growing as soon as they touch the soil. The roots penetrate the soil, quickly, and pull, by contraction, the axis of the runner downwards, vertically, developing a new rhizome. The short internodes elongate a little and start developing adventitious roots. At the end of the growing season, the plantlets arisen on the rooted nods of runners are already similar to the original plants with homogenous root system. On the side of the adventitious roots, new branches (side-roots) are formed. The root-branches are thinner but their capillary zone is more developed being more active in uptake of water and nutrients. The usual thickening ensues later.
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28-31.
Vol 6No 12000
The tissue structure of the vegetative organs of strawberry (root, rhizome, stolon, leaf) is discussed in this paper. The authors stated that the root structure described by Muromcev (1969) and Naumann-Seip (1989) develops further from the primary structure. It grows secondarily and the transport tissue becomes continuous having ring shape. In the... primary cortex of the rhizome periderm like tissue differentiates, but according to the examinations up to now, it does not take over the role of the exodermis. The exodermis is phloboran filled primary cortex tissue with 3-4 cell rows under the rhizodermis. The development of the transport tissue of the petiole is also a new recognition. In the lower third of the petiole the transport tissue consists of 3 collaterally compound vascular bundles. In the middle third there are 5 bundles because of the separation of the central bundle and in the upper third of the petiole 7 bundles can be observed because of the ramification of the outside bundles. Therefore attention must be taken also in the case of other plants at making sections. There might be confusions in the results of the examinations if the number of bundles increases in the petiole. The tissue structure might vary depending on the origin of the tissue segment. The palisade parenchyma of the leaf blade has two layers and it is wider than the spongy parenchyma. Among the 5-6-angular cells of the upper epidermis do not develop stomata while in the lower epidermis there are a fairly lot of them.
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