No. I (2010): Journal Of Agricultural Sciences - Supplement
Articles

Risk effects of the spread route of mycotoxins

Published October 5, 2010
Györgyi Bíró
University of Debrecen Centre of Agricultural and Applied Economic Sciences Faculty of Agricultural and Food Sciences and Environmental Management Department of Water and Environmental Management Department of Water and Environmental Management, Debrecen 4032 Böszörményi út 138.
János Tamás
University of Debrecen Centre of Agricultural and Applied Economic Sciences Faculty of Agricultural and Food Sciences and Environmental Management Department of Water and Environmental Management Department of Water and Environmental Management, Debrecen 4032 Böszörményi út 138.
János Borbély
University of Debrecen Centre of Agricultural and Applied Economic Sciences Faculty of Agricultural and Food Sciences and Environmental Management Department of Water and Environmental Management Department of Water and Environmental Management, Debrecen 4032 Böszörményi út 138.
Lili Mézes
University of Debrecen Centre of Agricultural and Applied Economic Sciences Faculty of Agricultural and Food Sciences and Environmental Management Department of Water and Environmental Management Department of Water and Environmental Management, Debrecen 4032 Böszörményi út 138.
Gergely Hunyadi
University of Debrecen Centre of Agricultural and Applied Economic Sciences Faculty of Agricultural and Food Sciences and Environmental Management Department of Water and Environmental Management Department of Water and Environmental Management, Debrecen 4032 Böszörményi út 138.
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APA

Bíró, G., Tamás, J., Borbély, J., Mézes, L., & Hunyadi, G. (2010). Risk effects of the spread route of mycotoxins. Acta Agraria Debreceniensis, (I), 90–95. https://doi.org/10.34101/ACTAAGRAR/I/8382

In Hungary the mycotoxin is a great problem, because there are many natural toxins in wheat and maize. These cereals can be found on
considerable proportion of the country’s sowing area, and they are deterministic food for the population. The direct human and animal
utilization of the contaminated cereals mean a serious risk in the food chain. In Hungary’s climate the soil is contaminated with pathogen
moulds, particularly Fusarium species, which increase by respective temperature and moisture content in cereals. The Fusarium can
decrease the quality of the wheat in different ways: decrease the germination capability and cause visible discoloration and appearance of
mould, reduces the dry material and nutrient content of the grain. From the toxins produced by the Fusarium genus, the trichotecene (T-2,
HT-2, deoxinivalenol, nivalenol, diacetoxyscxirpenol, Fusarenon-X) and the estrogenic zearalenon (F-2) are the most common in Hungary.
The fumonisins (FB1, FB2, FB3) first identified in 1988, relatively newly discovered, are also important. Major proportion of mycotoxins in a
healthy organization is metabolized by the enzyme system of liver and intestinal bacteria. The toxicity is reduced or even leaves off.
However, more toxic and biologically active compounds can be formed. For the reduction of mycotoxin-contamination several possibilities
are available in the case of storage, processing and feeding.

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