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  • Phyl-Gold: a product to diminish russeting of 'Golden Delicious' apples
    131-133.
    Views:
    125

    Producing high quality apples in mature trees of the cv. 'Golden Delicious' is rather difficult because of the russeting of it's fruits, especially in seasons of high relative humidity and/or wetness.

    Earlier experiments proved the possibility to decrease russeting by treatments of GA4.7 during a period after petal fall.

    Phyl-Gold, a product of Phylaxia Co. (ai. 10 g1-1 GA4.7) was applied to inhibit russet formation in fruit skin of 'Golden Delicious' apples. Four consecutive sprays were carried out (with 10 ppm a.i.) in weekly intervals, starting at petal fall and tank-mixed with the current pesticides of the plant protection program.

    Due to the GA4.7 application the russet formation decreased at a rate of economical importance. As for the side-effects of treatments, fruit set was reduced slightly in trees treated, however, there was no consequent influence on return bloom.

     

  • Role of organosilicone surfactant in apple scab control under scab conducive weather conditions
    23-25.
    Views:
    160

    Fungicides of integrated fruit production (dithianon, captan, and diclofluanid) and an organosilicone surfactant were compared in spray schedules from green tip until summer in order to control apple scab caused by Venturia inaequalis and to evaluate their phytotoxicity on fruit. Sixteen sprays of 1.8 kg ha-1captan, 0.41 ha-1 dithianon, and 1.8 kg ha-1 diclolfluanid significantly (P=0.05) reduced the incidence of leaf or fruit scab compared to unsprayed products. All fungicides applied with organosilicone at 0.1% resulted in lower incidence of scab on young and older leaves as well as on harvested fruit, but these were not statistically always better than fungicides applied alone. In case of diclofluanid, the fungicide applied with organosilicone at 0.1% resulted in significantly lower (P = 0.001) incidence of scab on young and older leaves. Diclofluanid applied with organosilicone at 0.1% gave the best scab control on leaf and fruit. Treatments applied with fungicides alone had no significant effect on plant phytotoxicity compared to untreated control. All fungicides applied with organosilicone at 0.1% increased (P = 0.05) fruit damage compared to untreated control or fungicide applied alone, though these were not always significantly different. In case of percentage of fruit russet, treatment of dithianon 0.4 1/ha + 0.1% organosilicone significantly increased fruit russet, while fruit russet index significantly increased in the treatment of diclofluanid 1.8 kg/ha + 0.1% organosilicone compared to untreated control. In sum, application of surfactants can help to increase efficacy of scab fungicides; and consequently, to reduce the risk of fungus infection under high scab disease pressure. This fact may also be helpful in fungicide resistance management and reduced-spray programs with accurate scab warning systems.