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Fruit drop: II. Biological background of flower and fruit drop
Published June 20, 2006
103-108.

The most important components of fruit drop are: the rootstock, the combination of polliniser varieties, the conditions depending of nutrition, the extent and timing of the administration of fertilisers, the moments of water stress and the timing of agrotechnical interventions. Further adversities may appear as flushes of heat and drought, the ...rainy spring weather during the blooming period as well as the excessive hot, cool or windy weather impairing pollination, moreover, the appearance of diseases and pests all influence the fate of flowers of growing and become ripe fruits. As generally maintained, dry springs are causing severe fruit drop.

In analysing the endogenous and environmental causes of drop of the generative organs (flowers and fruits), the model of leaf abscission has been used, as a study of the excised, well defined abscission zone (AZ) seemed to be an adequate approach to the question. Comparing the effects active in the abscission of fruit with those of the excised leaf stem differences are observed as well as analogies between the anatomy and the accumulation of ethylene in the respective abscission tissues.

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Production trial of Pleurotus sajor-caju (Indian oyster or phoenix) oyster mushroom
Published April 14, 2003
81-83.

Our experiments aimed at comparing the yields of the oyster mushroom hybrid Pleurotus HK 35 with those of the species Pleurotus sajor-caju on wheat straw. No data concerning the yields of the "Indian oyster" has so far been published in Hungary. The objective was, on the one hand, to discover what "phoenix" yields could be exp...ected on 100 kg substrate, and on the other hand, to compare the yields with those of Pleurotus HK 35 which plays a dominant role in commercial production. We were also curious to know the amounts of harvest losses with the two mushrooms when picked with cut stems. It would be advisable to make progresses in developing production technology, especially in increasing yields. Considering that in its native place this species is able to provide yields even at temperatures of 22-28 °C, it seems possible that in hot summer months, as a shift from the hybrid HK 35, the production of the "Indian oyster" could be more economical.

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