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Investigation of genetic diversity in irradiated maize lines and its relation to hybrid performance
Published May 23, 2006
20-26

Knowledge of genetic diversity among available parental lines is fundamental for successful hybrid maize breeding. The aims of this study were to estimate (1) genetic similarity (GS) and genetic distance (GD) (based on Jaccard index) in four maize inbreed lines; (2) to classify the lines according to their GD and GS; (3) to determine hybrid per...formance based on GD and heterosis for yield ability in 4x4 full diallel system. We used morphological description and AFLP (amplified fragment length polymorphisms) for estimation genetic polymorphism in four maize inbred lines. We estimated the applicability of genetic similarity in SC and reciproc hybrids for prediction of their performance.
Three primer combinations were used to obtain AFLP markers, producing 207 bands, 70 of whit were polimorphic. The dendogram based on genetic similarities (GS) and genetic distance (GD) and morphological description separated four inbred lines into well-defined groups. Morphological description just with AFLP analysis showed reliable results. In view of genetic distance, the UDL 1 line and their linear and reciprocal crosses showed significant heterosis effect, which was confirmed by heterosis calculation based on grain yield.

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Changes in the herbicide tolerance of maize genotypes in wet and dry years
Published October 30, 2011
124-127

The tolerance of 15 inbred maize lines grown on chernozem soil with forest residues in Martonvásár was tested against herbicides applied post-emergence in two dry, warm years (2003 and 2011) and in two cool, wet years (2004 and 2010). The herbicides mesotrione + terbutylazine, nicosulfuron and dicamba were applied to maize inbred lines in the... 7–8-leaf stage at the maximum dose authorised for practical use and at double this rate. The plants were scored for the intensity of visible phytotoxic symptoms 14 days after treatment.
The level of phytotoxicity observed in dry, warm years was 5.14%, averaged over the lines, herbicides and rates. The intensity of visible symptoms was almost 2.5 times as great in cool, wet years (12.76 %).
Averaged over the four years, the lines and the rates, the least damage was caused by dicamba (5.77 %), followed by mesotrione + terbutylazine (7.23 %). The most severe symptoms were induced by nicosulfuron (16.17 %). This could be attributed to the fact that some of the inbred lines were extremely sensitive to herbicides, especially those of the sulfonylurea type.
A difference of more than 1.5 times was observed between the two doses, but the correlation between the concentration and the severity of the visual symptoms was not strictly linear. Compared to the normal dose (100 %) the double rate resulted in a 162.5% increase in symptom severity. In most cases plants treated with the normal dose were symptom-free or only exhibited a low level of phytotoxicity.

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Gene Bank Developed by Induced Mutation for Selection
Published March 4, 2006
45-49

Heterosis breeding in maize caused gene erosion by using uniform inbred lines. In order to strengthen the genetic base, we established a gene bank containing lines with broad genetic variability, resistance and adaptability. The maize gene bank is a result of our work in the past two decades.
The gene bank originated from treatments of maize... seeds of hybrids and inbred lines with fast neutrons. The 1500 maize lines have great genetic variability which can be exploited after strict assessment and selection. As a result of the past several years, P 26, P 61 and P 62 lines have been released after DUS investigation in 2001.

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Studies on the Fusarium stalk rot infection of the maize genotypes using the Findex percentage and a computerised image analysis program
Published October 30, 2011
45-51

In a continental climate, the pathogens causing the most serious problems are species belonging to the Fusarium genus. When the pathogen attacks the stalk, the plant dies earlier, reducing grain filling and resulting in small, light ears. In addition, the stalks break or lodge, resulting in further yield losses from ears that cannot be harveste...d. During the three years of the experiment, 14 inbred lines were examined. The genotypes were sown in a two-factor split-plot design with four replications, with the genotypes in the main plots and four treatments in the subplots: two Fusarium graminearum isolates (1. FG36, 2. FGH4), 3. sterile kernels, 4. untreated control. The results experiments showed significant differences between the genotypes for resistance to fusarium stalk rot. Among the inbred lines the best resistance to fusarium stalk rot was exhibited by P06 and P07, both of which were related to ISSS. The precision and sensitivity of disease evaluations carried out visually and using image analysis software were compared in the experiment, and with two exceptions the CV values were lower for the image analysis. As the CV for measurements can be considered as a relative error, it can be stated that image analysis is the more precise of the two methods, so this technique gives a more accurate picture of the extent of stalk rot. The extent of stalk rot developing in response to natural infection is extremely environment-dependent, so the use of artificial inoculation is recommended for selection trials. 

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Comparison of Variability among Irradiated and Control Inbred Maize Lines via Morphological Descriptions and Some Quantitative Features
Published October 11, 2006
70-73

Knowledge of genetic diversity in breeding material is fundamental for hybrid selection programs and for germplasm preservation as well. Research has been done with nine irradiated (fast neutron) and four non-treated inbred lines. The aims of this study were (1) to investigate the degree of genetic variability detected with morphological descri...ption (based on CPVO TP/2/2) in these materials, (2) to compare the genetic changes among irradiated and non-irradiated maize inbred lines (based on some quantitative features). The irradiation did not change any of the characteristics clearly in positive or negative way, which can be related to the fact that the effect of induced mutation on genetic structure cannot be controlled. From the irradiated lines we have managed to select plants with earlier ripening times and better phenotypes. We could distinguish 3 main groups by the morphological features; these results match our expectations based on pedigree data. Markers distinguishable on the phenotypic level (e.g. antocyanin colouration, length of tassels) were significant in all lines.

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Field Tests on the Herbicide Tolerance of Various Maize Genotypes
Published September 15, 2003
21-23

Investigations were made in Martonvásár on the herbicide tolerance of 22 inbred maize lines and 3 parental single crosses when treated with one herbicide applied after sowing, prior to emergence, and with seven applied post-emergence in the 6-8-leaf stage. Visible damage was scored 14 days after the treatment.
An analysis of the phytotoxic... effects led to the conclusion that a single dose of the tested herbicides did not cause any damage to the genotypes investigated, with the exception of one inbred line, which was extremely sensitive to herbicides of the sulphonyl carbamide type and moderately sensitive to both rates of dicamba. In many cases, a double dose of the herbicides caused mild or moderate symptoms on the maize lines.

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Sensitivity of maize to herbicides in experiments in Martonvásár in 2015
Published June 2, 2015
47-52

The phytotoxic effect of herbicides applied post-emergence was investigated in a herbicide sensitivity experiment set up on parental maize genotypes in Martonvásár. A total of 48 Martonvásár inbred lines and 12 single line crosses were included in small-plot experiments set up in two replications. Ten herbicides were applied at the normal a...uthorised rate and at twice this quantity. Compounds intended for pre-emergence application were applied when maize was in the 3–4-leaf stage and post-emergence herbicides in the 7–8-leaf stage of development. The extent of phytotoxicity was scored two weeks after treatment. Some of the herbicides tested are not authorised for use in seed production fields, but it is important to know how the parental genotypes respond to all types of herbicides. Phytotoxic symptoms of varying intensity were only observed on a third of the 60 parental genotypes examined; the majority of the lines exhibited no reaction to any of the herbicides. Averaged over the 60 genotypes the level of phytotoxic damage was less than 10% for the single dose. When the double dose was applied somewhat more severe damage was induced by products containing Mesotrione + Nicosulfuron or Foramsulfuron + Isoxadifen-ethyl, but this was still below 15%. The herbicide dose had a three times stronger influence on the intensity of the symptoms than the type of herbicide. With the exception of Topramezone, there was a significant difference between the effects of the normal and double doses. The greatest dose effect differences, in decreasing order, were observed for Mesotrione + Nicosulfuron, Foramsulfuron + Isoxadifen-ethyl. Nicosulfuron and Mesotrione + Terbutylazine. The Mesotrione + Terbutylazine active ingredient combination only caused mild (<10%) symptoms on a total of 11 genotypes, while the Mesotrione + Nicosulfuron combination induced more severe phytotoxic symptoms on 26 lines. When Nicosulfuron was applied alone it caused milder symptoms on fewer genotypes than in combination with Mesotrione. Among compounds of the sulphonyl-urea type, the least severe symptoms on the fewest genotypes were recorded in the case of Prosulfuron.

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Herbicide tolerance of maize genotypes in the wet 2016 year
Published June 14, 2017
13-18

The herbicide tolerance levels of 49 Martonvásár inbred parents were examined in Martonvásár in a herbicide susceptibility trial in 2016. The normal dosage recommended in the permit documentations and double dosage were used for the 12 small-plot herbicide treatments performed in two repetitions. Spraying of early post-emergent herbicides w...as carried out in the 1–2-leaf stage, while post-emergent treatments were applied in the 7–8-leaf stage of maize. The extent of phytotoxicity was scored for the early post-emergent herbicides two and four weeks after treatments and for the post-emergent herbicides two weeks after treatments, respectively. Some of the herbicides examined are not approved in seed production; however it is important to know the reaction of maize parent genotypes for every type of herbicides. The active agent topramezone was withdrawn from the market in 2015, but it was included in the trials as its usage was allowed until stocks run out in 2016. The herbicide agents were examined as follows: mesotrione + S-metolachlor + terbutylazine; isoxaflutol + tiencarbazon methyl + cyprosulfamide; isoxaflutol + cyprosulfamide; mesotrione + terbuthylazine; tembotrione + isoxidifen-ethyl; mesotrione + nicosulfuron; prosulfu ron; nicosulfuron +prosulfuron + dicamba; bentazone + dicamba; nicosulfuron; topramezone; foramsulfuron + isoxadifen-ethyl.
Among early post-emergent herbicides, isoxaflutol + cyprosulfamide caused the less phytotoxic damage in the genotypes. The large amount of precipitation during the spring facilitated the infiltration of the active ingredient S-metolachlor, used regularly and successfully also in seed production, into the root zone, resulting in phytotoxic symptoms on susceptible inbred lines at the time of the first inspection. These genotypes recovered by the end of the vegetation period. The spring weather was cooler than usual, retarding the development of maize and thus led to the slower fermentation of herbicide active ingredients, accordingly, all of the post-emergent herbicides caused visible phytotoxic symptoms on some of genotypes. The most severe damages were generally caused by the double dosage of nicosulfuron + prosulfuron + dicamba, nicosulfuron, and foramsulfuron + isoxadifen-ethyl.

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Phytotoxicity levels in a wet year in an experiment on maize sensitivity to herbicides
Published November 2, 2014
92-96

The phytotoxic effects of herbicides applied pre-, early post- and post-emergence were studied in maize in a herbicide sensitivity experiment were set up in Martonvásár and Törökszentmiklós. The herbicides were applied in normal and in double doses to 37 Martonvásár inbred lines and to six parental single crosses. The small-plot experime...nts were set up in two replications. The wet weather that followed the pre- and early post-emergence treatments promoted the appearance of phytotoxic symptoms on maize. The degree of phytotoxicity was recorded on the 14th day after post-emergence treatment and on the 14th and 28th days after the pre- and early postemergence treatments. Herbicides applied pre-emergence only caused slight symptoms on maize. Although the double dose increased the damage, it was still not more than 5% on average. The symptoms caused by herbicides applied in the early post-emergence stage were more intensive than those detected in the pre-emergence treatments. However, the damage caused by the double dose of isoxaflutol + thiencarbazone-methyl and by the split treatment with nicosulfuron remained below 10%. The symptoms became somewhat more severe at the 2nd scoring date. Among the post-emergence treatments the maize genotypes had the least tolerance of the mesotrione + nicosulfuron combination of active ingredients, where the double quantities resulted in 13–14% damage in average.

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Comparison of RAPD and AFLP Analysis in Some Maize (Zea mays L.) Lines and Hybrids
Published October 11, 2006
3-7

The use of molecular markers to enhance plant breeding efforts is being widely studied. DNA-based fingerprinting technologies (RAPD and AFLP) have proven useful in genetic similarity studies. We estimated different maize (Zea mays L.) inbred lines and hybrids originated from mutant ones based on their genetic differences.
We carried out RAPD... analysis with different primers and the 707 (CCCAACACCC) and 792 (CAACCCACAC) primers with 50% similarities provided quite good DNA fragments. By applying the DNA based-AFLP technique, we had very dense DNA fingerprinting. We differentiated 15-32 polymorphic bands, the highest number of bands were found in P-T/H-CA (32). AFLP seems to be the more efficient method of comparing genetic similarities/differences among different genotypes.

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