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Mitigation of the effect of secondary salinization by micro soil conditioning
Published May 20, 2020
115-119

This research has the general goal to meet the customization of agriculture in small scale farming. We are developing a technique using micro doses of soil conditioners and organic material applied in the root zone of vegetable crops. We expected to change the physical and chemical properties of the affected soil, which has been irrigated w...ith salty water. Two different soil conditioners were tested. A lysimeter experiment including 8 simple drainage lysimeters was set up in the Research Institute of Karcag IAREF University of Debrecen in 2017. The main goal was to study the effect of different soil conditioners on the soil endangered by secondary salinization induced by irrigation with saline water. In order to compare the difference between the treatments, we collected soil samples, water samples, and determined the yields. Chili pepper (Capsicum annuum) was used as an indicator crop during one specific agricultural season. The technique called micro soil conditioning is rational because several reasons. The roles of the technique are various, for example it can serve as a source of carbon or a container for soil amendments and can minimize evaporation. We found this technique not to interfere with the chemical reaction or the interaction with the plants. However, the micro doses of soil amendments had the role to minimize the risk of soil degradation and do not significantly influence soil respiration. In addition, by improving soil properties, soil conditioning increases the leaching of the excess of salts from the root zone. In fact, this technique can decrease the cost of the inputs and improves the production of vegetables, and at the same time mitigates the effect of secondary salinization.

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Fruit melanotic ringspot (FMRS) – a disease of resistant Capsicum genotypes infected with Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) on the fruits
Published October 30, 2011
64-69

Etiology of pepper fruit melanotic ringspot (FMRS) disease (Salamon, 2009) was studied on fruit samples collected in forced pepper populations. It was noticed that in spite of heavy thrips (Frankliniella occidentalis) infestations and of TSWV epidemy detected in the forcing houses, FMRS occurred only in plants having healthy foliage. Symptomato...logical surveys strongly suggested that FMRS appeared exclusively in specific pepper genotypes. The size of melanotic ringspots has been observed to grow at room temperature during postripening of diseased fruits. A mechanically transmitted plant virus was isolated from symptomatic parts of 9 white pepper fruits affected by FMRS. On test plants each of the virus isolates caused systemic symptoms characteristic to TSWV. Using cDNA/PCR technique and TSWV N-gene specific primers a ca. 300 bp long DNA fragment has been amplified from total nucleic acid extracted from symptomatic tissues but never from asymptomatic parts of the fruits showing FMRS. Plant progenies grown from seeds of FMRS diseased fruits segregated in respect of resistance and/or susceptibility to TSWV infection. TSWV was also detected in and isolated from three fruits showed non-melanotic yellow rings (one of them was infected with a tobamovirus, too). Seedlings derived from these fruits proved to be susceptible to TSWV. Based on the above results we could conclude that the FMRS disease developed on fruits of “cecei” type white peppers that carry a TSWV resistance gene, most likely the Tsw gene in heterozygous form. These fruits were infected with thrips transmitted TSWV and FRMS appeared as a hypersentive reaction (HR) manifested in fruits.

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Effect of net shading technology on the yield quality and quantity of chilli pepper under greenhouse cultivation
Published June 1, 2021
5-9

This study was undertaken to identify the effect of net shading technology on the total capsaicinoids, vitamin C and relative chlorophyll content expressed as SPAD (Soil Plant Analysis Development) values and total marketable fruit yield of ‘Star Flame’ chilli pepper (Capsicum annuum) for two harvesting times cultivated under m...odified atmosphere. ‘Star Flame’ pepper was grown under three (3) different net shading colours (white, red and green). Samples without net shading were used as control. Samples were subjected to chromatographic analyses using HPLC for the determination of total capsaicinoids and vitamin C. Interaction in shading technology and harvest times (p=0.010) had significant effect on total capsaicinoids as a result of green and white shading technologies showing higher differences when compared to control samples. Vitamin C content was observed to have increased in white and red shadings (p=0.001) after the first harvest and gradually decreased after the second harvesting time (p=0.002). Relative leaf chlorophyll content was significantly higher in white shading in the first and second harvest. Samples used as control had significantly higher marketable values when compared to white and green shadings with red recording low marketability of ‘Star Flame’ chilli peppers.

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The toxic effects of aflatoxin microorganisms in plants used as spices
Published October 5, 2010
59-62

As an extension of the analysis of black, white and capsicum peppers for aflatoxins , we have examined an additional 11 types of spices and
4 herbs for these mycotoxins. The investigations consisted of assessment of the applicability of available methods of analysis and modifications of
these, where necessary together, with a limited surv...ey of each spice and herb for aflatoxins. The analysis of 13 types of ground spices reported
the presence of low concentrations of aflatoxins in some samples of black pepper, celery seed, and nutmeg. We decided to include in our study 5
of the spices examined by these workers (cinnamon, celery seed, coriander, nutmeg, and turmeric) for a comparison purpose. In addition we
examined ginger, mace, cumin seed, dill seed, garlic powder, onion powder, and the herbs marjoram, rosemary, thyme, and sage.

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The effect of different shading net on the Quantum Efficiency of PS II in chilli pepper cultivar ‘Star Flame’
Published December 15, 2019
21-23

The study was undertaken to identify the effect of different shading net on the quantum efficiency of PS II on ‘Star Flame’ chilli pepper (Capsicum annuum) over a period of time cultivated under plastic house environment. ‘Star Flame’ pepper was grown under red shading net and samples without shading were used as control. Analysis of ph...otosynthetic activity revealed a significant difference (p<0.05) between Fv/Fm values in control and red shading at the end of July (p = 0.031) after the first harvest. Chlorophyll fluorescence parameter Fv/Fm reflects the maximum quantum efficiency of photosystem II (PS II) used in the detection of early stress in plants.

 

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Effect of Selenium Supplementation on in vitro Radish and Green Pepper Seedlings Germination
Published December 6, 2005
149-155

Selenium (Se) is an essential trace element for animals, microorganisms and some other eukaryotes. It has become increasingly evident that Se plays a significant role in reducing the incidence of lung, colorectal and prostate cancer in humans. Although there is evidence that selenium is needed for the growth of algae, the question of essentiali...ty of Se in vascular plants is unresolved. Therefore Raphanus sativus (Se accumulator) and Capsicum annuum (non Se accumulator) were treated with 0-200 mg/l natrium-selenate. The results showed that lower (2 mg/l) concentration natrium-selenate increased the fitomass and total antioxodant capacity in seedlings.

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Evaluation of the correlations between the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) and yield in a seasoning paprika (Capsicum annuum L. var. longum) stand
Published September 18, 2014
45-49

...5); font-variant-ligatures: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; text-decoration-style: initial; text-decoration-color: initial;">The aim of our examination was to evaluate the correlations between the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) and yield, as well as to examine the possibility of yield estimation basedon NDVI in a seasoning paprika population.

Significant correlations were observed during the examination of the correlation between NDVI and yield. Furthermore, it was concluded that yield can be estimated with a 6.6–8.3% mean error based on the regression equations. No significant difference was shown between the error of estimations performed with various regression types and that of the estimations performed at various dates. For this reason, the identification of the optimum estimation method and the determination of the optimum date for estimation call for further examinations.

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