Vol 8 No 2 (2002)
Cikkek

Aminoglycoside antibiotics affect the in vitro morphogenic response of chrysanthemum and tobacco

Published August 14, 2002
Da Silva Teixeira
Faculty of Agriculture, Kagawa University, Miki-cho, Kagawa, 761-0795, Japan
S. Fukai
Faculty of Agriculture, Kagawa University, Miki-cho, Kagawa, 761-0795, Japan
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APA

Teixeira, D. S., & Fukai, S. (2002). Aminoglycoside antibiotics affect the in vitro morphogenic response of chrysanthemum and tobacco. International Journal of Horticultural Science, 8(2), 93-104. https://doi.org/10.31421/IJHS/8/2/346

Abstract

Broadly the success of genetic transformation of plants requires non-chimeric selection of transformed tissues and its subsequent regeneration. With rare exceptions, most plant transformation protocols still heavily utilize antibiotics for the selection of transgenic cells containing an antibiotic-degrading selectable marker gene. The morphogenic capacity of in vitro chrysanthemum and tobacco stem and leaf explants change with the addition of aminoglycoside antibiotics (AAs). Of 6 antibiotics tested, phytotoxicity occurred at 10-25 and 50-100 pgml-I in chrysanthemum and tobacco explants, respectively, depending on the size of the explant and the timing of application. The presence of light or darkness also had a significant effect. The use of transverse thin cell layers (tTCLs) in conjunction with high initial AA selection levels supported the greatest regeneration of transgenic material (adventitious shoots or callus) and the lowest number of escapes. Flow cytometric analyses demonstrate that regeneration can be predicted in both species, depending on the ploidy level of the callus. Endoreduplication was not observed in chrysanthemum, even at high AA levels, but occurred (8C or more) in tobacco callus, even at low AA concentrations (5-10 pgml-1). The higher the AA level, the greater the DNA degradation and the lower the 2C and 4C values.

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