Évf. 52 szám 3-4 (2013): Prózai kegyességi műfajok a kora újkorban
Tanulmányok

Petrarca De remediis utriusque fortunaejának recepciója a 16–18. századi magyarországi irodalomban

Megjelent július 1, 2013
Réka Lengyel
Bölcsészettudományi Kutatóközpont Irodalomtudományi Intézet
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APA

Lengyel, R. (2013). Petrarca De remediis utriusque fortunaejának recepciója a 16–18. századi magyarországi irodalomban. Studia Litteraria, 52(3-4), 58–66. https://doi.org/10.37415/studia/2013/3-4/58–66.

In the 14th–18th centuries Petrarch’s most widely disseminated work was De remediis utriusque fortunae. Petrarch’s Latin works had been known in Hungary since the 15th century and in the 18th century a real cult of De remediis can be traced, proved by the correspondence of contemporary aristocrats, scholars and politicians (e. g. István Brodarics, Farkas Kovacsóczy). His sonnets and the lines of Triumfi were often read, quoted, translated (e. g. by Bálint Balassi, Miklós Zrínyi); the Griselda, Boccaccio’s novel, known mainly in Petrarch’s Latin translation, also got translated into Hungarian (by Pál Istvánfi). His letters written in verse, as well as the Sine nomine collection, the Secretum and the De vita solitaria were certainly being read in Hungary. During the 17th–18th centuries Hungarian readers could get acquainted at first-hand with the name and works of the Italian humanist through the foreign printed editions of Petrarch’s writings. Writers, scholars, ecclesiastical leaders and others read and used these texts for both private and public purposes. In the 18th century De remediis was reedited eight times and its only complete translation so far was prepared between 1760 and 1762. The reception of De remediis is thus a highly important chapter in Hungarian spiritual history.