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Effect of sowing time and planting space on change of yield and protein content of white lupine (Lupinus albus L.)
Published February 3, 2016
85-89

The hinge of the lupine crop cultivation technology is the sowing time and the determination of the breeding area. According to the literature the early sowing (as soon as possible to go to the soil) and larger growing area is recommended for seed production. Based on the results of our 2 years experiment, the effect of sowing time and differen...t spacing is important on yield of white lupine, and the effect of the sowing time is more significant. A decrease in the yield was observed after later sowings. The yield and the rate of its decreasing was varied in one year and among different years depending on wheather condition and sowing time.

The role of sowing time is significant for protein content of seeds. The average protein content decreased due to the later sowings in 2014, while 2015 the protein content of seeds in early sowing time and of plants sowed 4 weeks later was similar. We measured less protein content in the 2. sowing time sowed 2 weeks later than the first one. In the studied years the average protein content of seeds from different row spaces were not different.

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The impact of sowingdate and production area on the yield of white lupin (Lupinus albus L.) on Nyírség brown forest soil
Published March 11, 2014
133-137

The lupine is very sensitive to the different ecological conditions. The examinations of lupine was started in 2003 and our aim is determine yield components which directly affecting crop yields (flower, pod and seed number per plants) in different sowing times (3 times, two weeks apart) and growing area area (240, 480, 720 cm2) comb...inations. According to our results the sowing times, the growing area and the meteorological conditions are influence on yield significantly. Our data suggest that the early sowing and large growing area combination is favourable to rate of fertilized plants and to development of yield. Later sowing reduces the seed yield depending on the cropyear. In our experiment, the decrease of yield was in the unfavourable year (2003) 20–96%, and in the most favourable meteorological conditions (2004) 10–79%, and in rich rainfall year (2005) 15–88%.

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Rye plant parameters in the Westsik crop rotation experiment
Published April 27, 2020
39-45

Our research work was carried out in the Westsik crop rotation field experiment in 2018. The main research purpose was to analyse the effect of the different organic and chemical fertilizers on parameters of rye. Our results revealed some differences between the different fertilization methods. One spike weight, grain weight of one spike, r...ye plant height, rye plant weight per m2 and 1000 seed weight in crop rotations VII, XV and VIII were different from the data of all crop rotations. This finding can be explained by the fact that crop rotations VII and XV were non-fertilized, only 23.3 t ha-1 straw manure (VII) or green lupine manure was applied as a second crop (XV). In addition, crop rotation VIII consists of four parts where we apply chemical fertilization with green lupine manure as a main and second crop. There is a positive close correlation between rye plant height and other studied characters (rye plant weight per m2, spike length, weight of one spike, grain weight per spike, spike weight per m2, grain weight per m2 and 1000 seed weight).

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Investigation of new seed mixtures in wildlife forage ground managem
Published February 10, 2013
9-13

...5); font-variant-ligatures: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; text-decoration-style: initial; text-decoration-color: initial;">One of the most important method of habitat development is wildlife forage ground management. Many plant species can be grown on the crop fields, as mixture, too. Use of seed mixtures has not been spread on the native wildlife forage ground, however there are many advantages of them.

The aim of the research is to examine the role of the different plant species, seed mixtures in the game feeding, the savouriness of the plants of crop fields, as well as ascertain which seed mixtures are more suitable for wildlife forage ground management. On the basis of the investigation it can be find out that big amount of forage can be produced on mixed crop fields. Buckwheat, corn, rape, millet and white lupine proved to be the most beloved plants. It is suitable to make such mixed forages and use widely in the native wildlife forage ground management,

– which assures better feed conditions for the game,

– which are more attractive for the game and can draw away from other areas, so prevent, reduce game damage in forestry sector and in

agriculture that is in the forest manager’s, agricultural and game manager’s interests, too.

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Nitrogen Supplying Capacity of Brown Forest Soil under Different Cropping Practices and 0.01 M CaCl2 Soluble Organic Nitrogen
Published October 11, 2006
17-23

The best known and most remarkable example of continuous production in Hungary is the Westsik’s crop rotation experiment, which was established in 1929, and is still in use to study the effects of organic manure treatment, to develop models, and predict the likely effects of different cropping systems on soil properties and crop yields. In th...is respect, Westsik’s crop rotation experiment provides data of immediate value to farmers concerning the applications of green, straw and farmyard manure, as well as data sets for scientific research.
Although commonly ignored, the release of nitrogen by root and green manure crops has a significant impact on soil organic matter turnover. The design of sustainable nitrogen management strategies requires a better understanding of the processes influencing nitrogen supplying capacity, as the effects of soil organic matter on soil productivity and crop yield are still very uncertain and require further research. In the treatments of Westsik’s crop rotation experiment, nutrients removed from soil through plant growth and harvesting are replaced either by fertilisers and/or organic manure. Data can be used to study the nitrogen supplying capacity of soil under different cropping systems and its effect on the 0.01 M CaCl2 soluble organic nitrogen content of soil.
The aim of this paper is to present data on the nitrogen supplying capacity of brown forest soil from Westsik’s crop rotation experiment and to study its correlation with hundredth molar calcium-chloride soluble organic nitrogen. The main objective is to determine the effects of root and green manure crops on the nitrogen supplying capacity of soil under different cropping systems. The nitrogen supplying capacity was calculated as a difference of plant uptake, organic manure and fertiliser supply.
The 0.01 M CaCl2 soluble organic nitrogen test has proved reliable for determining the nitrogen supplying capacity of soils. Brown forest soils are low in organic matter and in the F-1 fallow-rye-potato rotation, the nitrogen supplying capacity was 15.6 kg/ha/year. 0.01 M CaCl2 soluble organic nitrogen content was as low as 1.73 mg/kg soil. Roots and green manure increased the nitrogen supplying capacity of soil by more than 100%. This increase is caused by lupine, a legumes crop, which is very well adapted to the acidic soil conditions of the Nyírség region, and cultivated as a green or root manure crop to increase soil fertility.

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Yield components of hairy vetch (Vicia villosa Roth.) in different sowing technologies on acidic sandy soil
Published December 15, 2019
83-88

Nearly a quarter of the agricultural utilized area of our country is made up of sandy soils. Sandy soils are poor in nutrients, and, therefore, the effectiveness of farming is basically determined by the method of maintaining soil fertility and the fertilization practice.

The hairy vetch called Vicia villosa Roth (Sandy Roth.), also kno...wn as a sand pioneer, plays a significant role in the exploitation of sandy soils. Its cultivation was started in Hungary in the late 1800s. It is primarily used as green fodder, most recently as a green manure and as a soil protection plant. The lupine is grown mainly as a supportive plant, which was previously rye, and today it is triticale. The ratio of the two plants to each other and the spatial location of plants depend on the method of sowing.

The aim of our work was to present the yields of some of the grain grown in different sowing methods and some of its crops.

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