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Trends in Dry Pea (Pisum sativum L.) Production
Published May 12, 2002
53-58

Dry pea is an important, cool-season grain legume, which is grown worldwide on over 6 million hectares. The major producing countries outside Europe are China and Canada, followed by India, Australia, and the United States. France, Canada and Australia produce over 2 million hectares and are major exporters of peas. During the 1980’s, in deve...loped countries of the European Union, pea production rose yearly by 6-10%, which represents a significant increase in both area and yield. Europe accounts for 50-75% of world pea production. In the 1990’s, the European Union produced 4-5 million tonnes of dry pea, of which 3-4 million tonnes were used for feed and 1 million tonnes for export. At the end of the 20th century, the growth in production was low, mainly because of the absence of support measures, and the better returns offered by other crops. In the countries of the former Soviet Union, dry pea was primarily used as feed and pea production dropped, due to a trend in livestock raising.
Food consumption of dry pea is concentrated in developing countries, where grain legumes represent a useful complement to cereal-based diets as a relatively inexpensive source of high quality protein. As a result, human consumption of grain legumes fell from 2,2 kg/capita in 1961 to 0,5 kg/capita in 1999. The importance of grain legumes in food protein supply decreased, while that of cereal products increased. Shortage of grain legumes has adverse effects on the nutritional standard of poor people in developing countries.
World dry pea production reached 16,7 million tonnes in 1990, with 3,7 million tonnes used as food, 11,4 million tonnes used as feed, and 1,0 million tonnes used as seed. Dry pea production was 10,9 million tonnes in 1999, and 3,5, 5,8 and 0,8 million tonnes was used as food, feed and seed, respectively. In the coming decades, world grain legume production and utilization as feed are expected to expand at a slower rate than in the 1980’s. Most of the increase is expected to occur in Eastern European countries, Canada and Australia, where production is anticipated to grow at 2% annually. The projection for the new millennium was derived from adjusted trends in area and yield over the period 1961-2000, based on FAO statistical data.

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Cytokinin and auxin levels in micropropagating Red Fuji and McIntosh apple varieties
Published May 27, 2001
53-59

Effects of media hormone content on in vitro shoot multiplication and rooting were examined in cv. Red Fuji and McIntosh apple scions. Multiplication responses of shoots to different concentrations (0.5 and 1.0 mg/l) of 6-benzylaminopurine and 6-benzylaminopurine riboside were tested at two levels (0.1 and 0.3 mg/l) of indole-3-butyric acid. Th...e best proliferation rate was achieved on medium containing 1.0 mg/l 6-benzylaminopurine and 0.1 mg/l indole-3-butyric acid in cv. Red Fuji (5.3) and on medium containing 1.0 mg/l 6-benzylaminopurine and 0.3 mg/l
indole-3-butyric acid in cv McIntosh (10.3). The length of shoots on these media was enough for rooting (38.4 mm in cv. Red Fuji and 39.3 mm in cv McIntosh). Shoots developed on the best proliferation medium were used for rooting. Effects of different concentrations of auxin in the root induction media and presence of activated charcoal in the root elongation media were examined on rooting capacity. The best rooting rate (100% in cv. McIntosh and 83% in cv. Red Fuji) was achieved when the root induction medium contained 1.0 mg/l indole-3-butyric acid. In general, rooting was inhibited in the presence of activated charcoal.  Because of high in vitro multiplication and rooting rate and high percent of survival during acclimatisation, the methods described here make effective micropropagation processes possible for cv. Red Fuji and McIntosh. 

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Nutritive value of Timothy (Phleum pratense L.) during primary growth in 2005
Published December 21, 2009
61-67

In this paper we analysed the change of the chemical composition and nutritive value of Timothy observed during the spring of 2005. The nutritive value of Timothy was observed between the end of April and the beginning of June relating to the following parameters: crude protein, crude fibre, crude fat, ash, N-free extract, net-energy growth, ne...t-energy lactation, net-energy maintenance, Metabolizable Protein Energy dependent, Metabolizable Protein N-dependent. We also analysed whether a relationship between the environmental factors that affect the
growing period of grasses and the chemical composition can be detected or not. While testing for correlation, the number of days from 1st January, the amount of heat accumulation, solar radiation and rainfall were considered as independent coefficients.
For the estimation of weather conditions we calculated the climate index. The observed year can be described as a year with a rainfall above the average and abundant solar radiation. A correlation can be detected between the change of parameters of nutritive value and the quality of the current year. In 2005 the result of the analysis of nutritive value was showed a significance difference with respect to each chemical composition at the rate of P<0.001 depending on the time when the samples were taken.
According to the outlined data it can be stated that the change of the value of crude protein and ash show decreasing tendency agreeing the research literature. In parallel with the change of nutritive value, the amount of crude fibre and N-free extract increased. However, the value of Net-Energy maintenance showed an alteration only in the first half of the observed period. The same alteration tendency can be detected in the Net-Energy growth and the Net-Energy lactation. 

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Changes of chemical composition and nutritive values of Reed Canary Grass (Phalaroides arundinacea) in first growth
Published December 1, 2010
37-42

Change in chemical composition and nutritive value of Reed Canary Grass (Phalaroides arundinacea) were investigated in springtime in 2004-2006. The nutritive value of Reed Canary Grass was observed between the end of April and the middle of June relating to the following parameters: crude protein, crude fibre, crude fat, ash, N-free extract, ne...t-energy growth, net-energy maintenance, Metabolizable Protein Energy dependent,
Metabolizable Protein N-dependent.
It was also analysed whether a relationship between the climatic factors affecting the growing period as well the chemical composition of grasses and the annual weather were looked for. For the estimation of weather conditions the climate index was calculated. A correlation can be detected between the change of parameters of nutritive value and the quality of the current year. Between 2004 and 2006, the result of the analysis of nutritive value indicated a significant difference with respect to each chemical composition at the rate of P<0.01 depending on the time when the samples were taken. According to the outlined data it can be stated that the change of the value of crude protein and ash show decreasing  endency agreeing the research literature. In parallel with the change of nutritive value, the amount of crude fibre and N-free extract increased. However, the value of Net-Energy maintenance revealed an alteration only in the first half of the observed period. The same alteration tendency can be detected
in the Net-Energy growth. 

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Nitrogen Supplying Capacity of Brown Forest Soil under Different Cropping Practices and 0.01 M CaCl2 Soluble Organic Nitrogen
Published October 11, 2006
17-23

The best known and most remarkable example of continuous production in Hungary is the Westsik’s crop rotation experiment, which was established in 1929, and is still in use to study the effects of organic manure treatment, to develop models, and predict the likely effects of different cropping systems on soil properties and crop yields. In th...is respect, Westsik’s crop rotation experiment provides data of immediate value to farmers concerning the applications of green, straw and farmyard manure, as well as data sets for scientific research.
Although commonly ignored, the release of nitrogen by root and green manure crops has a significant impact on soil organic matter turnover. The design of sustainable nitrogen management strategies requires a better understanding of the processes influencing nitrogen supplying capacity, as the effects of soil organic matter on soil productivity and crop yield are still very uncertain and require further research. In the treatments of Westsik’s crop rotation experiment, nutrients removed from soil through plant growth and harvesting are replaced either by fertilisers and/or organic manure. Data can be used to study the nitrogen supplying capacity of soil under different cropping systems and its effect on the 0.01 M CaCl2 soluble organic nitrogen content of soil.
The aim of this paper is to present data on the nitrogen supplying capacity of brown forest soil from Westsik’s crop rotation experiment and to study its correlation with hundredth molar calcium-chloride soluble organic nitrogen. The main objective is to determine the effects of root and green manure crops on the nitrogen supplying capacity of soil under different cropping systems. The nitrogen supplying capacity was calculated as a difference of plant uptake, organic manure and fertiliser supply.
The 0.01 M CaCl2 soluble organic nitrogen test has proved reliable for determining the nitrogen supplying capacity of soils. Brown forest soils are low in organic matter and in the F-1 fallow-rye-potato rotation, the nitrogen supplying capacity was 15.6 kg/ha/year. 0.01 M CaCl2 soluble organic nitrogen content was as low as 1.73 mg/kg soil. Roots and green manure increased the nitrogen supplying capacity of soil by more than 100%. This increase is caused by lupine, a legumes crop, which is very well adapted to the acidic soil conditions of the Nyírség region, and cultivated as a green or root manure crop to increase soil fertility.

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Soil Fertility Management in Westsik’s Crop Rotation Experiment
Published December 4, 2001
34-39

The crop rotation experiment, established by Vilmos Westsik in 1929, is the best known and most remarkable example of continuous production in Hungary. It is still used to study the effects of organic manure treatment, develop models and predict the likely effects of different cropping systems on soil properties and crop yields. Westsik’s cro...p rotation experiment provides data of immediate value to farmers concerning the applications of fertilisers, green, straw and farmyard manure. The experiment also provides a resource of yield, plant and soil data sets for scientific research into the soil and plant processes which control soil fertility, and into the sustainability of production without environmental deterioration. The maintenance of Westsik’s crop rotation experiment can be used to illustrate the value of long-term field experiments.

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Effect of fertilization on the potentially mineralize N forms of soil of long term field experiment was set in an acidic sandy soil
Published November 15, 2007
20-24

The aim of this paper was to provide further information about the nitrogen mineralization processes of soil. A modified incubation technique was applied to establish the amount of easily soluble mineral and organic N forms during the incubation period. An acidic sandy soil was used for incubation, which was sampled from the „Westsik” long-...term field experiment. The incubation was carried out on fifteen selected soil samples which were received different treatments since the experiment was set up. 
From the obtained results, the amount of potentially mineralizable N and the mineralization rate constant were determined. Results of chemical analysis and biological interpretation of results are discussed.

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