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Model Experiment Analysis of the Antioxidant Effect of Conjugated Linoleic Acid
Published July 16, 2007
15-18

Corn milled like flour was crumbled with 5% butter containing a high level of conjugated linoleic acid, then kept exposed to air on an aluminium tray at a layer of 1 cm thickness. Its acid number, peroxide number and fatty acid composition were measured weekly. It was established that during a 24 week long period, there was very little change i...n the composition of fatty acids, but after this, in parallel with the increasing acid number and peroxide number, the amount of unsaturated fatty acids decreased, while those values for saturated fatty acids did not change considerably. With these investigations, the authors proved the antioxidant effect of conjugated linoleic acid.

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The possibility of increasing at the conjugated linoleic acid content in pork
Published September 8, 2020
27-32

The composition of fatty acids in food products is a significant factor in human health. Feeding can significantly influence the composition of fatty acids in the animal fat. We analysed the effect of feeding high CLA-content (conjugated linoleic acid) feed on the composition of fatty acids in pork. The animals were grouped according to the fol...lowing: Group 1) feeding experimental, ghee-mixed feed for 76 days, Group 2) feeding the same feed, but only for 33 days, Group 3) feeding sunflower-oil-mixed feed for 76 days. Ghee contains CLA in high amount. The aim of our experiment is to analyse how the high CLA content influences the fatty acid content of pork. In the end of the fattening experiment the animals were slaughtered, then samples were taken from the loin, ham, abdomen and backfat from 10 animals from each group and analysed the fatty acid content. We found significant differences between the average fatty acid content of the samples. As an effect of feeding ghee-enriched feed, the CLA content significantly increased, compared to the control group. However, the linoleic acid and the arachidonic acid content were lower, and the proportion of fatty acids was also lower when feeding control feed.

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Changes in fatty acid composition of pork rich in conjugated linoleic acid frying in different kind of fats
Published December 21, 2009
31-35

In 1990ys antiatherogen, antioxidant and anticarcinogen effect of conjugated linolacids (CLA) was detected. From this reasons, our aims in this study were producing pork rich in CLA and studying the change of fatty acid composition of the produced pork cooked different kind of fats. For frying palm and sunflower oil and swine fat were used. Thi...gh was cutted for 100 g pieces. Meat pieces were fried at 160 °C for 1 and 8 minutes. Estimation of frying data it was determined that higher (0.13%) CLA content of pork was spoiled (60-70%) except in case of swine fat cooking,
because it is extremly sensitive for oxidation and heating. Swine fat has higher (0.09%) CLA content than plant oil, protecting the meat’s original CLA content. Cooking in swine fat did not have significant effect on fatty acid composition of meat. Low level of palmitic acid contect of sunflower oil (6.40%) decreased for half part of palmitic acid content of pork (24.13%) and it produced cooked meat with decreased oil acid content. Contrary of above, linoleic acid content of fried meat was increased in different folds as compared to crude pork. If it was fried in sunflower oil with high level linoleic acid increased (51.52%) the linoleic acid content in fried pork. The linoleic acid content of the high level CLA pork increased four times (48.59%) to the crude meat (16.59% and 12.32%). The high palmitic acid content of palm fat (41.54%) increased by 60% the palmitic acid content in fried pork, low stearic acid (4.44%) and linoleic acid content (10.56%) decreased the stearic and linoleic acid content of crude meat.

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Effect of dietary fatty acids on the oxidative stability and the colour of broiler meat
Published May 23, 2006
25-30

The aim of our investigation was to determine the effects of increased PUFA (polyunsaturated fatty acids) content on the colour, total pigment content, organoleptic characteristics and oxidative stability of poultry meat. The experiment was carried out with 1200 Ross-308 cock chicklings. Animals were fed with a 3 phase diet, and in each phase, ...additional fat was added to the feed. The isocaloric and isonitrogenic feed was produced as the breeder organization suggested; only the fat content differed (4 treatments: pig fat (lard), sunflower oil, soy oil, flax-seed oil).
The different fat complements did not influence broiler production. However, the fatty acid composition of meat was similar to the fatty acid composition of feed (additional fats). The analyses of meat samples, after a storage period, did not significantly prove the possible negative effects of higher PUFA content.

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Ethological Observations at an Outdoor Gilts Keeping System
Published May 4, 2004
9-15

The authors examinated behaviour of twenty-eight, grouped-housed Hungarian large white x Hungarian landrasse gilts in grassland-based production system.
The social rank was recorded on two days following, social rank was unaffected by even age or weight of gilts.
The daily liferhythm was recorded on four different days in two weeks period.... Within daily rhyhtm the following behaviours were recorded: eating, drinking, grazing, rooting, excretion and resting. On the first two observation days gilts were more active, in their daily activity two pitches were recorded.
30% of the whole paddock was used specifically by pigs as resting and excretion area.

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Effect of raised level α-linolenic fatty acid diet on broiler meat quality
Published July 16, 2007
29-33

The aim of our investigation was to determine the effects of increased α-linolenic content in food on the colour, total pigment content, organoleptic characteristics and oxidative stability of poultry meat. The experiment was carried out with 1200 Ross-308 cock chicklings. Birds were fed three-phase diets, contained four different fat sources:... lard, sunflower oil, flaxseed oil and soybean oil. According to the experiment, the different oil sources had no effect on growth performance, but the fatty acid composition of diets was reflected in the meat fatty acid profile. We could detect just slight change in colour in the treated meat, which was not caused by the decreased pigment content. The detected change in colour during the storage was not in relation to initial PUFA content. TBA level did not prove the accelerated lipid peroxidation which was expected in case of higher α-linolenic containing the meat. The data obtained in meat storage trial, could not prove clearly the negative effect of the higher α-linolenic content of the meat.

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Phosphorus (from Different Phosphorus Sources) Utilisation in Piglets, and the Effect of the Addition of Phytase into the Feedstuff
Published December 10, 2002
30-36

The experiments were carried out in a 2x2 factorial treatments with three replicates, and were completed with 32P phosphorus metabolism measurement. Hungarian Large White x Dutch Landrace growing pigs with 15–18 kg starting live weight were involved in the experiment.
The experimental scheme was the following:
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Diet consisted of maize and extracted soybean meal. Both components have high phytase content and low phytase activity. 1/a animals received their P-supply according to their needs and 1/b animals got 10% less than their actual P-need in the first part of the experiment.
In the second part of the experiment both groups (2/a, 2/b) received identical P-supply and 500FTU/kg P supplementation. Apart from P- and phytase-supplementation, the piglets’ diet was identical.
Total P digestibility was 52% without phytase supplementation, which increases by 4% when P was added according to need and by 12% increase of decreased P-supply. Digestibility of nutrients somewhat increased as effect of phytase supplementation. According to the results of 32P experiments, inorganic P digestibility of MCP was 82–90.8%, which decreases to 73.4–87.2% in case of phytase supplementation.
Parallel with tendency, native P digestibility of the diet was 31.5–32.2%, which increased to 42.5–54.5% in the case of phytase supplementation.
Results support the that inorganic P input can be decreased by phytase supplementation and as a consequence P output, the concept and environmental pollution can at the some time be decreased.

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Effect of sex on some composition traits of wild boar (wild pig) meat
Published December 21, 2009
25-29

The authors examined the nutrition value of the meat of shot wild boars (wild pigs) (n=66) from three wild boar enclosures with different feeding intensity and also the technological properties of the meat. Samples were taken immediately after the evisceration. Considering the storing and processing properties of game meat the samples were take...n from m. serratus anterior. As for dry matter examination results, the highest values were measured in case of semi-intensively fed wild boars, then followed the data from the samples of intensively and extensively fed wild boars. The fat content from the meat samples of intensively and extensively fed wild boars proved to be lower while in case of the semi-ntensively fed wild boars it was higher. In females the dry matter content, while in males the fat content was higher. As for the protein content there were no differences in either the feeding groups or in the genders. It was only the water holding capacity of the samples from the meat of the females from semi-intensive feeding intensity wild boar enclosure that fell in between normal values.

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Results of Giltsrearing in Outdoor Production System
Published May 11, 2003
8-11

The applied technology is an alternative approach to pigkeeping-systems. An outdoor pig production breeding sows are kept at pasture either year-round or in a certain period of the year. The important equipments of outdoor pig production are farrowing or grouping sows inhuts, which protect pigs against the effects of extreme weather, and electr...ic fences, which surround and divide the pasture. Concentrate feed can be fed from the ground or from feeders which are made of steel or timber. One of main advantages of this pig keeping system is the total mobilizable keeping technology.
Within the scope of the study we are performing an experiment to make a comparison between coventional system and free range sows keeping technology. Pannonhybrid F1 gilts were used in this experiment, 28 gilts were kept on pasture all day and 28 gilts are kept in conventional, indoor system.
In this work the results of gilts-rearing are presentated as a part of our two-years experiment.

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