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Phytoplasma infection status survey in plum psyllid (Cacopsylla pruni) population
Published December 15, 2019
45-48

European Stone Fruit Yellows (ESFY) phytoplasma disease causes an increasing amount of damage. This is especially true to the Gönci growing region. The insect vector of the disease, which has been shown to have a vector role during transmission experiments, is the plum psyllid (Cacopsylla pruni). In 2018, during the swarming period of plum psy...llid, in 3 different settlements (Boldogkőváralja, Nagyvárad and Bekecs) 265 psyllidswere collected, from which 165 were plum psyllid. Molecular biology studies showed 106 individuals infected with phytoplasma, of which 20 were males and 86 were females.

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Biological control of sweet chestnut on Pécsbánya, Hungary
Published June 30, 2018
77-81

The supervision of plant hygiene of sweet chestnut grove on Pécsbánya (South Hungary) started more than four years ago. Hypovirulent strains were applied as a biological process to control Cryphonectria parasitica fungus which causes the chestnut blight disease. By now the performed interventions have shown obviou...s results, the vitality of the trees has greatly improved, the amount of harvested nuts is increasing, and the hypovirulent strain has been spreading within the area. During plant health inspection the galls of chestnut gall wasp (Dryocosmus kuriphilus) was found in the year of 2015, which is the obvious symptom of new occurrence of the pest. The pest was eradicated by destroy galls, which allows taking out of consideration the damage by now in this area.

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Review of the biology of plant psyllid (Cacopsylla pruni, Scopoli 1763), and its role in the spreading of European stone fruit yellows, ESFY-phytoplasma with Hungarian data
Published June 30, 2018
25-33

The European stone fruit yellows (ESFY) phytoplasma disease caused by pathogen ’Ca. Phytoplasma prunorum’ induces serious damages in cherry, sour cherry, peach, and apricot orchards mostly in Europe. Its known vector is the plum psyllid (Cacopsylla pruni). Many articles report on the biology (morphology, taxonomy, life cycle etc.) and the m...ethod of transmission of the pathogen by the vector, and the possibilities of their control. This paper reviews our knowledge about the vector, and summarises the results of an inland research carried out in a northeastern Hungarian apricot orchards. Our goal was to show some important data for the farmers or anyone who is interested in this disease and its vector. And give some known method that we can protect our orchards against them to prevent the appearance of the disease. As the psyllid that became infected with the pathogen can hold its infectionous capacity during their lifetime, it is very important to have enough knowledge about their lifecycle, that we can determine the right time and method to control them. We also have to know how to identify them; therefore, this paper lists several important data which can be helpful. The most important keys of identification are their wing color, which dark borwn in the apex and brown is in the remaining part of the forewing. The length of the antennae is also an important factor, since other genuse’s species have longer antennae than twice the width of the head. C. pruni has as long antennae as twice the width of the head. They return to Prunus species in early spring and we have to protect our orhards in this period against them. We have to use preparations with a knock down effect on them to prevent the inoculation of the pathogen into the trees in our orchards.

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Examination of the plum psyllid (Cacopsylla pruni Scopoli), a vector of European Stone Fruit Yellows (ESFY) phytoplasma in the countryside of Boldogkőváralja (Hungary)
Published February 8, 2019
5-11

European Stone Fruit Yellows(ESFY) phytoplasma disease on apricot was identified by molecular methods for the first time in 1992 in Hungary. Currently, the pathogen is known as’ Ca. Phytoplasma prunorum’. Since, the pathogen become wide-spreaded and manyof the apricot-plantations had to be eliminated. In 2009 and 2010 in the countryside of ...Boldogkőváralja the infection of the apricot-plantations was about 77%. As the disease spreading and causing large damages, we studied the roleo fpossible vector,the plum psyllid (Cacopsylla pruni Scopoli) in the areas of Boldogkőváralja, North-East-Hungary. Studies were done in the year of 2016, monitoring the behaviour of the psyllids in four different areas, and caught 41 them for further examination. We collected plant samples from those apricot trees, on which the plum psyllids were caught.

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