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Possibility of oil seeds in feeding dairy cows
Published March 20, 2014
67-73

The efforts to modify the fatty acid composition of milk have intensified with health conscious nutrition coming to the forefront.This experiment of ours was designed to investigate to what extent the natural-based feed additives, such as oilseeds, can influence the fatty acid composition of cow’s milk.Further information was gained about fee...ding of oilseeds in specific amounts to be fitted into the technology of a large-scale dairy farm in practice. The feed supplements were whole, untreated rapeseed and whole, untreated linseed, as part of a total mixed ration. In case of saturated fatty acids when supplementing with whole rapeseed the most significant change was observable in the concentration of the caprylic acid, capric acid, undecylic acid, lauric acid, myristic acid, stearic acid. In case of unsaturated fatty acids the quantity of oleic acid enhanced considerably. When observating the feeding with whole linseed the concentration of many saturated fatty acids lowered (caprylic acid, capric acid, lauric acid, myristic acid, palmitic acid). The quantity of some unsaturated fatty acids was showing a distinct rise after feeding with linseed, this way the oleic acid, α-linolenic acid, conjugated linoleic acid, eicosadienoic acid. The aim of the study was to produce food which meets the changed demands of customers, as well.

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Alternative protein sources in the nutrition of farm animals
Published September 5, 2018
21-31

Protein requirement and its demand of farm animals became one of the critical problems in nutrition on a global scale. Protein requirement has been an explicit demand for a long period with soybean meal and animal protein, but recently there are some limitations in relation to their use and the availability of the high quality fishmeal decrease...s constantly. For this reason there is increased demand for finding new protein sources which could be the alternatives of soybean meal and fishmeal. Alternative protein sources can be divided into seven categories, according to their origin. In different countries, their use depends on the availability in large quantity and at reasonable price.

There is a long tradition of using legume seeds, as alternatives of soybean. Most of them contain some anti-nutritive compounds, but it can be reduced with systematic selection. Oilseed meals are also generally use in poultry and pig nutrition, but those crude protein content varied, depending on the oil extraction technology. Green fodder and leaf protein was also proposed as alternative protein sources, but their use is limited, in particular because of the market price. The amount of bioethanol and starch industry by-products increases gradually in recent years, therefore those became alternatives of soybean meal, or in much less extend, fishmeal. However, amino acid composition of such by-products are far from optimal for poultry and pig; therefore, in the case of their use amino acid supplementation is necessary. Several novel protein sources are proposed in the last decade, such as algae or insect proteins. Recently, their availability and use is limited, but in the near future those would be alternative protein sources in monogastric animal nutrition.

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Effect of mineral fertilizers with different sulphur content on the yield of winter wheat in a small plot experiment
Published November 2, 2009
97-100

We can find more and more references on the importance of sulphur and sulphur fertilization, mainly in the case of most important field crops, as cereals, maize, and the oilseeds. The traditional sulphur sources continuously lost their importance by the stringent air pollution orders and nowadays they are not able to meet the demands of plants.... Besides, the application of superphosphate, as phosphorus mineral fertilizer, decreased in several countries. Sulphur fertilization is required in most cases to reach the required yields and quality parameters. The lack of
sulphur causes decreased nitrogen utilization and yield by cereals as winter wheat, moreover, results less favourable baking parameters.
We have examined the N and S content of different parts of winter wheat plants in a small plot experiment at the University of Debrecen, Centre of Agricultural Sciences, Látókép Experimental Station. We have also studied the effect of different sulphur fertilization forms and doses on the baking quality parameters and yield. Our aim was to contribute to the development of yield and quality improving sulphur fertilization methods, adaptable by practice.
We have measured the lowest yield in the case of one of the control plots, and 100 kg/ha nitrogen, 80 kg/ha potassium and 70 kg/ha phosphorus nutrient supply resulted the lowest yield (8.7 kg/plot). The maximum yield, 10.2 kg/plot was also experienced on superphosphate fertilized plot by the application of 140 kg/ha phosphorus dose. Application the first dose of both Biofert and FitoHorm 32 S leaf fertilizers raised the yield from
9.1 to 9.9 kg/plot. ANOVA proved that Biofert and FitoHorm 32 S had no significant effect on the amount of yield, the increase is only a tendency.

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