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  • Influence of nitrogen fertilisation on the technological quality of wheat
    47-55
    Views:
    46

    Wheat is one of the most grown crops around the world. Its primary use is in the production of bread, bakery, and confectionery. The provision of essential nutrients, mainly nitrogen, plays a pivotal role in the growth and development of wheat. The wheat varieties used in the experiment are Alfold and Mv. Menrot. The rates of nitrogen used in the experiment are: 0, 200, 400, 600, 800, and 1000 kg N ha-1. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of nitrogen fertilisation on technological quality of wheat and to find the appropriate fertiliser rate to reduce pollution. The results indicate that nitrogen fertilisation did not show a significant effect on thousand kernel weight and test weight. However, nitrogen fertilisation significantly affected protein content, gluten content, Zeleny sedimentation index, and the falling number. The higher the nitrogen fertilisation the better the technological quality parameters of the wheat. The protein content, gluten content, Zeleny sedimentation index and the falling number were the lowest at 0 kg N ha-1 followed by 200 kg N ha-1 then 400 kg N ha-1 and the highest at 600 kg N ha-1.

  • Milestones in the development of agronomic management practices in crop production
    203-209
    Views:
    135

    From the dawn of the history of the human race, agriculture has always been a profound activity of mankind producing food and feed as well as various plant originated materials for further processing.

    Agronomy, like any other human activity, depends on the perpetual development of knowledge and technical skills, - in a modern context – science and innovation. This paper is intended to provide the reader with information regarding the main phases of the development of agricultural production from the Neolithic societies through the early Mesopotamian and Egyptian empires to the inventions of first organised learned society of Rome. The major research findings of the past two millennia including agro-chemistry, genetics and technical development are presented.

    Such a review should not lead to any scientific conclusions, but rather a philosophical postulate similar to that of Jonathan Swift written some centuries ago: “And he gave it for his opinion, that whoever could make two ears of corn, or two blades of grass, to grow upon a spot of ground, where only one grew before, would deserve better of mankind, and do more essential service to his country, than the whole race of politicians put together”.