Search

Published After
Published Before

Search Results

  • Angle-count sampling method for estimating forest stand volume – a practical approach
    99-102
    Views:
    143

    Point sampling, which is also known as angle-count sampling (ACS), can be considered an efficient way of estimating the basal area and volume of forest stands. It is possible to use it in forest management: providing more accurate estimates (precision <10%) of  site and stand characteristics needed for management planning. 20 black locust (Robinina pseudoacacia L.) stands were selected at final cutting age to determine the regeneration criteria based on their total volume. It was verified that at P=5% there was no difference between the main volume values of stands indicated in the relevant forest plans as well as calculated by the ACS method.

     

  • Volume of Paulownia Shan Tong (Paulownia fortunei × Paulownia tomentosa) plantation in Eastern Hungary: a case study
    43-46
    Views:
    123

    Volume tables for tree plantations are not unknown in international practice. In many places, this is due to the uniqueness of the species or variety composition of the plantations and the cultivation technology used. In most cases, this is also justified by specific soil (ecological) conditions. In Hungary, publications on Paulownia have not yet included a volume table. This is the first one we are publishing, thus it can be considered as a gap-filler. The research was conducted in Monostorpályi, a 1.8 hectare, 8-year-old municipal plantation. 8 trees were selected randomly and their parameters were studied.

  • Ecological value of wood energy plantations in the support of some animal groups
    143-148
    Views:
    23

    Today, some environmental problems have reached such severe proportions that it is no longer enough to recognise them, but environmentally friendly solutions must be used to reduce them. The reduction in the area of natural forests of native species is causing problems in several ways.

    This research aimed to highlight how environmental, conservation and economic interests can be reconciled. In addition to natural forests, wood energy plantations are becoming increasingly important. Energy import dependency is a problem for most countries, for which wood energy plantations can partly offer an alternative. Native forests can be protected, and their area increased where possible. Meanwhile, energy plantations can be established in areas with low agricultural productivity.

    In this experiment, I studied a plantation of Pedunculate Oak (Quercus robur), a Black Locust (Robinia pseudoacacia) and a Paulownia (Paulownia Shan Tong). I selected burrowing birds and ground-dwelling arthropods as indicator groups. I did this by establishing a nesting colony and soil trapping. I wanted to demonstrate that, in addition to natural forests, wood energy plantations have a role not only in economic terms but also in maintaining certain animal groups. Soil trapping tests were carried out in all three tree plantations.

    The obtained results showed that in the Paulownia plantation, the occupancy rate of nest boxes was almost 100%, while in the Black Locust plantation it was around 30%. Among the species that occupied the nesting sites, the Common Starling (Sturnus vulgaris) and the Eurasian Tree Sparrow (Passer montanus) were more abundant, while Great Tit (Parus major) was present in the Black Locust plantation. These are opportunistic species for which nesting opportunity is the most important factor, since their feeding area (in the case of the Common Starling and the Eurasian Tree Sparrow) is not typical of the nesting area. The soil trap investigations show that there are no significant differences in the composition of the arthropod group (beetles, spiders) in the study areas.

  • Growth and yield patterns of black locust (Robinia pseudoacacia L.) sample trees affected by site conditions: case studies
    125-128
    Views:
    32

    The trees removed from the long-term experiment plots are available for the measurements as lying trees. Through the determination of the volume in sections along the stem, the stem form, the stem volume and other factors can be specified. The comparison of the stems of individual trees of first and third yield classes of black locust (Robinia pseudoacacia L.) stands shows that site conditions have a main effect on the yield (mean tree volume). The difference can be as high as 53% at the age of 30 depending on the sites. To determine the growth patterns based on tree volume is rather a new approach in the light of the relevant literature. The obtained results also highlight the importance of choosing the appropriate tree species for a given site.

  • Yield and crown structure characteristics in a red oak (Quercus rubra L.) stand: Case study
    49-53
    Views:
    109

    The paper provides the results of a detailed analysis of timber volume and several important crown variables of red oak (Quercus rubra L.) based on an experimental plot in eastern Hungary. At the age 32 years the crop trees belonged to different height classes. If the volume of the mean tree from height class I was considered as 100%, the volume of the mean tree of class II was 59%, and the mean tree of class III was only 36%. It appeared that there was a significant correlation between crown indices and yield. For this reason, diameter at breast height showed a positive linear correlation with crown diameter (R2= 0.6211). Additionally, there was also positive linear relationship between crown diameter and volume (R2= 0.6908). The variation of crown indices is height even within the same stand and indicates the importance of following a selective thinning operation method.

  • Yield table for selected black locust (Robinia pseudoacacia L.) cultivars
    193-198
    Views:
    159

    In Hungary, the black locust (Robinia pseudoacacia L.) can be considered as the most important fast-growing, stand-forming introduced tree species. Due to its positive growing technological characteristics as well as wood utilization possibilities, at the present, black locust is the most widely planted tree species in Hungary, covering 25% of the country’s total forest area. One of the important tasks ahead of Hungarian black locust growers is to improve the quality of black locust stands with introducing selected cultivars. For the estimation of the growth rate and yield a numerical yield table has been constructed on the basis of surveys of the experimental plots established in pure,managed ’Nyirségi’ ,’Üllői’ and ’Jászkiséri’ black locust cultivars’ plantations which can be suitable for sawlogs production. In the course of 56 stand surveys the key stand characteristics were measured, and then, were reconsidered the average height, diameter (DBH), volume, basal area and stem number given separately for the main (remaining), secondary (removal) and total stands per hectare. The programmable editing procedure allows to extention and formal change of information content of the yield table according to different demands.