Vol. 56 (2020)
Articles

Minitrae Et Numini Eius. A Celtic Deity and the Vulgar Latin in Aquincum

Published September 1, 2020
Tünde Vágási
Doctoral School of History, Eötvös Loránd University, Budapest

APA

Vágási, T. (2020). Minitrae Et Numini Eius. A Celtic Deity and the Vulgar Latin in Aquincum. Acta Classica Universitatis Scientiarum Debreceniensis, 56, 179–193. https://doi.org/10.22315/ACD/2020/11

The subject of this paper is a curious and somewhat problematic inscription on an altar from Aquincum. Among the many features of this inscription that are interesting for our study, the most striking one is the beginning of the text: the name of the god or goddess is controversial. Who exactly was Minitra? A Celtic goddess, or someone much better known from Roman religious life? According to Géza Alföldy, the native gods of Pannonia were venerated still in the 3rd century A.D., including Teutates, Sedatus, Ciniaemus and Minitra, etc. Since the inscription in question contains many vulgar Latin phenomena, it becomes questionable whether the name of the deity is written correctly, especially because, while the names of classical gods rarely appear misspelled, the names of the gods of so-called ‘eastern’ cults and mystery religions appear in a number of faulty variations. I will try to identify the deity through the analysis of Vulgar Latin phenomena.