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Evaluation of various silo sorghum hybrids from the energetic aspect
Published February 10, 2013
107-111

...5); font-variant-ligatures: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; text-decoration-style: initial; text-decoration-color: initial;">The sweet sorghum is a perspective plant of bioenergy, which can be the foundation of Hungarian bioethanol production in the future. By the examination six sweet sorghum hybrids have been examinated by the viewpoint of sugar aggregation and bioethanol production capacity. The founda tion of the surve y was three growing se ason (201 0, 2011, 2012 ). The ex per ime nt w as on the production sites of U niversity of Debrecen CAAES RISF Karcag Research Institute. The production site of the sweet sorghum have been sampled by samples of 1 m2 by hybrids within the period of august 15 and november 15. The sugar content of the samples have been measured by refractometer which was the base in the determination of ethanol production capacity.

As a continuation of the evaluation of energetic viewpoint the Higher Heating Value (HHV) have been measured from the bagasse of sweet sorghums. According to the results it can be stated that int he case of sugarcontent and the dinamics of the sugar aggregation can show several differences, while HHV of sorghum bagasse is within 16 200 and 16 900 J g-1.

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Caliometric characterisation of crop production byproducts
Published February 25, 2014
55-58

By the decreasing tendency of the fossil energy resources more emphasis put on the usage of renewable energy resources. The consideration of environmental protection and the efforts of the European Union make current the widespread usage of renewable energy within biomass energy. One of the determinative trends of biomass energy is the direct c...ombustion of biomass. Characteristically woody stocks are produced for this aim, but there is a considerable potential in several byproducts of growing herbaceous plants or of other processes.

In our study three byproducts of plant production have been investigated which appeared at the harvest. The Higher Heating Values of wheat, maize and sunflower byproducts have been determined by an IKA C2000 Basic adiabatic calorimeter. According to the statistical analysis of the measured data the HHV of the byproducts are different, and these values are in a negative correlation with the amount of ash in % (R2=0.873) appeared by the combustion.

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Changes in fatty acid composition of pork rich in conjugated linoleic acid frying in different kind of fats
Published December 21, 2009
31-35

In 1990ys antiatherogen, antioxidant and anticarcinogen effect of conjugated linolacids (CLA) was detected. From this reasons, our aims in this study were producing pork rich in CLA and studying the change of fatty acid composition of the produced pork cooked different kind of fats. For frying palm and sunflower oil and swine fat were used. Thi...gh was cutted for 100 g pieces. Meat pieces were fried at 160 °C for 1 and 8 minutes. Estimation of frying data it was determined that higher (0.13%) CLA content of pork was spoiled (60-70%) except in case of swine fat cooking,
because it is extremly sensitive for oxidation and heating. Swine fat has higher (0.09%) CLA content than plant oil, protecting the meat’s original CLA content. Cooking in swine fat did not have significant effect on fatty acid composition of meat. Low level of palmitic acid contect of sunflower oil (6.40%) decreased for half part of palmitic acid content of pork (24.13%) and it produced cooked meat with decreased oil acid content. Contrary of above, linoleic acid content of fried meat was increased in different folds as compared to crude pork. If it was fried in sunflower oil with high level linoleic acid increased (51.52%) the linoleic acid content in fried pork. The linoleic acid content of the high level CLA pork increased four times (48.59%) to the crude meat (16.59% and 12.32%). The high palmitic acid content of palm fat (41.54%) increased by 60% the palmitic acid content in fried pork, low stearic acid (4.44%) and linoleic acid content (10.56%) decreased the stearic and linoleic acid content of crude meat.

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