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The effect of various composts on vegetable green mass on two soil types
Published May 16, 2017
179-183

Composting of sewage sludges makes easier the utilization of sewage sludge in the agriculture and the composts in good quality could increase the nutrient content of soil. Due to the composting process, the sewage sludge composts with high organic matter content can be utilized in the same way as other composts or farmyard manure.
Composts p...roduced in different ways have different effects on the physical, chemical and biological properties of different soils, although their positive effects have already proved in the literature. In our study the effects of composts from different composting processes were investigated in soil-plant systems. The different physical and chemical properties of the two examined soil types (arenosol and chernozem)strongly influenced the nutrient supply capacity of composts which could be characterized by the growth of ray-grass as a test plant in the pot experiment. In this work we examined the effects of three different composts on the green weight of plants on the fourth and eighth weeks after the treatment and sowing.

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Review of research on salt-affected soils in the Debrecen agricultural high educational institutions, with special focus on the mapping of Hortobágy
Published September 5, 2018
471-484

The history of the research of Debrecen scholars on salt-affected soils of Hortobágy and the region is very rich and diverse. 
Focusing on mapping, the following stages can be distinguished, indicating the completeness of the maps and the purpose of the performed work
− First, quantitative maps (Arany, 1926) for the utilization of... the lands at 1:75,000 (Figure 1).
− Second, quantitative map (Kreybig, 1943) for the utilization of the lands at 1:25,000.
− Third, category map (Kreybig et al., 1935) testing the suitability of the classification system at  :75,000.
− Fourth, partial category map (Szabolcs, 1954), showing the reasons of unsuccessful management at 1:10,000.
− Fifth, partial quantitative map (Csillag et al., 1996), showing the utility of digital sampling at 1:25,000.
− Sixth, partial quantitative map (Tamás and Lénárt, 2006), showing the capacity of multispectral  remote imagery at 1:100.
− Seventh, partial quantitative map (Douaik et al., 2006), showing the usefulness of geostatistical  mapping at 1:10,000.
− Eight, national quantitative maps (Pásztor et al., 2016), showing the applicability of geostatistics for administrative purposes at 1:10,000.
− Ninth, partial quantitative/category map (authors, 2019), finding the optimal methods at 1:10,000.

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Comparative Evaluation of the Temperaments of Charolais and Hungarian Grey Steers
Published September 22, 2004
14-19

Animal breeding increasingly lays claim to the theoretical and practical knowledge of applied ethology. The authors’ aim was to evaluate and compare the temperaments of Charolais (CH, n= 10) and Hungarian Grey (HG, n= 10) steers, and also to determine the correlation between their temperament scores and flight speed scores. Temperament was ev...aluated by the results of the scale test (assessing of behaviour in a 1-5 score system, while the animal is standing on a scale for 30 seconds) and flight speed test (minutes it takes the animal to move a set distance of 1.7 m when leaving the scale), on three occasions (1, 2, 3). Data management was done by SPSS.10 (ANOVA, Mann-Whitney-test, Spearman-correlation). Results of the scale test differed significantly between breeds at the third measurement (CH: 2,9 scores; HG: 1,4 scores; P<0,01) and when evaluating the three measurements together (CH: 2,0 scores; HG: 1,37 scores; P<0,05). Concerning of flight speed score, there were significant differences between breeds of steers at each measurement (1. measurement CH: 2,77 s; HG: 4,09 s; P<0,05; 2. measurement CH: 2,89 s; HG: 5,01 s; P<0,01; 3. measurement CH: 2,46 s; HG: 5,33 s; P<0,01) and overall (CH: 2,71 s; HG: 4,81 s; P<0,001). In the case of both breeds, evaluated by measurements and overall, a negative correlation was calculated between temperament score and flight speed score, but this was significant only in three cases: CH1 (n=10) r= -0,75; P<0,01; CH1+2+3 (n=30) r= -0,44; P<0,05; CH+HG1+2+3 (n=60) r= -0,33; P<0,01). Results indicate that Hungarian Grey steers are calmer than individuals of Charolais. Animals behaving calmer on the scale left the scale, more slowly. The authors propose the use of these temperament tests in Hungarian breeding practice, in order to select too temperament animals.

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