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Storage ability and differences of carrot varieties defined by firmness changes measured with new non-destructive acoustic method
Published February 8, 2006
37-40.

Carrot production in Hungary is getting more important these days. The condition of the quality insurance is to choose the proper variety of carrot and store on optimal conditions therefore measuring firmness and matter parameters are very important. Four varieties of carrots were measured (Bangor, Olympus, Napa and I3olero). The roots were sto...red in unsealed polyethylene bags at 4-10 degrees Celsius and 95% relative humidity. The vegetables were measured three times: at harvest, after I .5 months of storage and after four months of storage. The samples were tested by non-destructive acoustic. Stillness measuring method during the 112 days experiment for firmness. In laboratory were measured weight loss, dry material -NO3 and sugar content as an important matter parameters.

The firmness change as a function of storage time are the following: First part of the storage (after 60 days), the Napa variety changed least in the case of acoustical parameter, at the same time its weight Foss and dry material content were not rise significantly, while its sugar content increased with 50%. The l3olero variety had the highest changes of sugar content during storage. During the second storage period, the softening speed of all samples was increased. The Bolero had the highest average mass loss (32,7%) and NO3 content changes as well. All measurements showed the largest changes for the Bolero variety. The highest percentage of dry material content was found by the Bolero and Napa varieties (18-20%).

In this experiment, we found that the Bolero variety showed the greatest loss in compressibility during storage. If both firmness and weight loss results are considered, the Napa variety is found to be the most storable variety in sort period. The Bangor variety was found to be the best for long-term storage.

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Postharvest methyl jasmonic acid and hot water can reduce the internal breakdown and quality loss of apricot fruit at shelf life
Published July 29, 2020
31-34.

The aim of this study was to investigate the postharvest effect of methyl jasmonic acid (MJ) and hot water on internal break-down and quality loss of apricot fruit under shelf life conditions. Cultivar Flavor cot apricot fruit were used to treat with water as control treatment, with 0.2 mmol/L MJ and with hot water 35 oC for 5 min. F...ruit were stored at room temperature and were examined every 2 days for internal break-down and quality loss. Results showed that treated fruits with MJ and hot water showed the lowest weight loss and the highest firmness during all assessment times. Control fruits showed losing of customer acceptance from the day 2 of shelf life and then decreased dramatically to approximately loss all the acceptance at day 8. The SSC showed sever reduction in untreated fruit after day 6 at shelf life. Total phenol content reduced and polyphenol oxidase (PPO) increased in all assessment times for all treatments. Meanwhile MJ showed the best values for phenol content and lowest PPO activity. The results supported the idea of using some elicitors like methyl jasmonic and hot water treatments to enhance shelf life of apricot fruit.

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Apricot fruit chilling injuries during the cold storage affected by harvest maturity
Published December 19, 2019
28-31.

The study aimed to find the effect of different maturity classes (up to the days after full blossom) on the post-harvest life of 3 different apricot varieties Gold Cot, Bergarouge and Flavor Cot in Hungary. The fruit harvested in a particular time 65, 75 and 85 days after full blossom and divided to three maturity classes (Class 1, 2 and 3, res...pectively). Fruit stored in cold storage for 7 days at temperature 1 °C. Fruits were investigated in regard to physical parameters (weight loss, fruit firmness and soluble solid content SSC) and chilling injuries. The results showed that the varieties followed different ways in regard to response to different maturity classes. The maturity class I for all the tested varieties recorded the lowest weight loss, while with the increasing maturity stage the weight loss percentage for all the varieties recoded high values. The firmness decreased with delayed harvesting for all the varieties. Data of the chilling injuries showed that all the fruits which harvested at maturity I, recorded the highest percentage of fruit with CI (chilling injuries) at 0 (48.5, 37.25 and 38.75%) and CI class I (44.75, 35.75 and 39.75%) for Bergarouge, Gold Cot, and Flavor Cot.

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Storability of some apricot varieties as affected by storage period
Published April 25, 2012
39-42.

The aim of this study was the estimation of storability of 10 apricot varieties in regard to percentage fruit weight loss, firmness, acidity and T.S.S in fruit during storage periods from one week to 4 weeks. All the variety gave the same trend as all of them loss weight, firmness decreased, acidity and T.S.S decreased but the differences were ...not the same in all varieties. in case of some varieties the percentage of fruit weight loss reached to about 9 % after 28 days also the differences between varieties in two seasons refer that this character is determined by genetic factors beside effect of environmental and agriculture factors.

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Improving the postproduction quality of Rose cut flowers
Published November 15, 2004
109-114.

In order to improve the post production quality of cut flowers of Rosa hybrida L. cv. Baroness, the effect of 8-hydroxyquinoline sulfate (8-HQS), silver thiosulfate (STS) and 1-methylcyclopropene ( I-MCP) were investigated. 8-HQS was used at 200 and 400 ppm with or without sucrose at 50 g LI. STS was used at 0.2, and 0.4 mM with or wit...hout sucrose at 50 g 1-I. l-MCP was used at 0.3, 0.5 and 0.7 g in-3 for 6h.

The postproduction quality was improved as a result of using any chemical treatment comparing with untreated control. All the treatments of 8-HQS increased the vase life and minimized the percentage of weight loss of rose cut flowers compared to the control. The vase life was lorger when 8-HQS was combined with sucrose. The best treatment of 8-HQS was 400 ppm 8-HQS + 50 g 1-1 sucrose. STS treatment led to prolong the vase life and minimized the percentage of weight loss compared to the control. In addition, the effect was better when sucrose was added to STS. The treatment of STS at 0.4 mM + 50 g 1-1 sucrose was the best one. l -MCP treatment prolonged the vase life and lowered the percentage of weight loss at any level compared with untreated control. The best treatment in this concern was l -MCP at 0.5 g m-3 for 6h. The chlorophyll content (chl.a and chid)) of the leaves for the best treatment of each chemical was higher than the control. The treatment of STS at 0.4 mM + 50 g 1-1 sucrose gave the best results in this respect.

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Postharvest features of chrysanthemum cut flowers as affected by different chemicals
Published March 16, 2004
127-131.

Cut flowers of Chrysanthemum morifolium RAM cv. Suny Reagan were treated with different concentrations of 8- hydroxyquinoline sulfate (8-HQS), silver thiosulfate (STS) and 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP) in order to improve the post production quality. 8-HQS was used at 200 and 400 ppm with or without sucrose at 50 O. STS was used at 0.2,... and 0.4 mM with or without sucrose at 50 g/1 1-MCP was used at 0.3, 0.5 and 0.7 g/m3 for 6h.

All the treatments of 8-HQS prolonged the vase life and minimized the percentage of weight loss of chrysanthemum cut flowers compared to the control. The vase life was larger when sucrose not combined with 8-HQS. The best treatment of 8-1-IQS was 400 ppm 8-HQS without sucrose. STS treatment led to prolong the vase life and minimized the percentage of weight loss comparing to the control. In addition, the effect was better when sucroseas was added to STS. The treatment of STS at 0.4 mM + 50 g/I sucrose was the best one. 1-MCP treatment increased the vase life and lowered the percentage of weight loss at any level comparing with untreated control. The best treatment in this concern was 1-MCP at 0.5 g/m3 for 6h. The chlorophyll content (chl.a and chl.b) of the leaves for the best treatment of each chemical was higher than that of the control. The treatment of 1-MCP at 0.5 g/m3 6h gave the best results in this respect.

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Structural differences arise between fruit cuticles of two apple cultivars during long term cold storage
Published December 4, 2018
26-29

Apple fruits are covered by hydrophobic cuticle that provides protection against desiccation, pathogens, excessive water absorption and radiation. The features of cuticle affect the quality and storability of the fruits. It was aimed to evaluate the correlation between peel ultrastructure and weight loss in fruits covered by waxy bloom (cv. Flo...rina) and without bloom (cv. Red Rome van Well) during 4-month cold storage. SEM (scanning electron microscopy) was used for visualization of the fruit surface and fruit weight was also measured. Several studies have revealed that there may be correlation between the ultrastructure of cuticle and its water permeability. Our results confirmed this phenomenon in case of two cultivars. The weight loss per fruit surface area unit of ‘Florina’ was found significantly higher than that of ‘Red Rome van Well’. At the same time the cuticular surface of the fruits contained more micro-cracks in case of the former cultivar. These data confirmed the relationship between the density of cuticular micro-cracks and the water vapour permeability. We concluded that this feature is more significant than the amount of natural waxy bloom on fruit surface.

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Effect of postharvest sodium benzoate treatment on some fruit parameters of two organic apple cultivars
Published July 29, 2020
35-37.

The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of postharvest sodium-benzoate treatment on some fruit parameters of two organic apple cultivars (’Topaz’ and ’Florina’). Assessments were made at three times during storage: 17 November 2019, 20 December 2019 and 23 January, 2020. During every assessment dates, each fruit was observed... separately, and determined the proportion of i) healthy fruits (%), ii) post-harvest fruit rot diseases iii) fruits with mechanical injury (%), iv) fruit with russetting (%), v) damage of codling moth and vi) Ca-deficiency symptoms. In addition, fruit weight (g) was measured at each assessment date. Sodium benzoate reduced the fruit decay and the proportion of healthy fruit was higher in this treatment compared to water treated fruit. This effect could be seen in all assessment dates and on both cultivars. Effects on other parameters were various according to cultivar and assessment dates. Loss of fruit weight was similar in both treatments and cultivars compared to control treatment.

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1-MCP and STS as ethylene inhibitors for prolonging the vase life of carnation and rose cut flowers
Published November 15, 2004
101-107.

The effect of STS and 1-MCP on the postharvest quality of carnation and rose cut flowers was studied. Cut flowers of Dianthus c..aryophyllus L. cv. Asso and Rosa hybritia cv. Baroness were treated with silver thiosulfate (STS) at 0.4 mM with sucrose at 50 g 1-t and 1-methylcyclopropene ( I -MCP) at 0.5 g m<...sup>-3 for 611.

Pretreatment with STS and 1-MCP significantly extended the vase life and minimized the % loss of initial weight of carnation and rose cut flowers comparing to the untreated control. The two chemicals applied inhibited the chlorophyll degradation and carbohydrate loss and hence, significantly improved the postharvest quality of carnation and rose cut flowers comparing to the control. Ethylene production by cut flowers was inhibited as a result of using these chemicals. In general, there were no differences between STS and (-MCP but the later does not have the heavy metal implications of STS treatment, and hence, using 1-MCP pretreatment for extending the vase life of carnation and rose cut flowers was recommended.

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Effect of modified atmosphere package on apricot fruit storability
Published December 9, 2018
30-32.

The aim of this work was to study the effect of modified atmosphere package (MAP) on apricot storability. Apricots (Prunus armeniaca L.) cultivar Jumbo cot were harvested at commercial ripening stage. The fruits were treated with different storage treatments as following: i) control storage for 13 days at 1 °C, ii) stored fruit at 1 ...C for 10 days then 3 days at shelf at 25 °C, iii) fruit stored in MAP at 1 °C for 13 days and iv) fruit stored in MAP at 1 °C for 10 days then 3 days at shelf at 25 °C. Data showed the positive effect of MAP in keeping the apricot fruit for long time with better quality than the control fruit. MAP showed positive effect by recording the lowest fruit weight loss, the highest firmness and lowest chilling injury and fruit decay.

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Rate of scab infection and quality parameters of apple fruit in organic and integrated production systems
Published August 23, 2000
63-67.

In this study, the rate of scab infection and quality parameters (content of vitamin-C, dry matter, sugar, total acids, specific weight, quality index and flesh firmness) of some apple cultivars are given, moreover, the relation between those characters was examined in two environmental systems (organic and integrated) in a rainy season. In the... organic fruit production, scab infection of leaves was significantly higher than in the integrated system, in case of the same cultivars, which means that the rate of decrease in leaf area was heavier in the organic production. Cultivars did not differ statistically in parameters of inner content when the integrated system was compared to the organic one. Results did not show statistical difference between loss of leaf area caused by apple scab and the parameters of inner content, which is attributed to the regeneration of leaf area due to favourable weather conditions. Data on apple scab and inner content of the fruit justify essentially the environmental systems of apple production.

 

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Experimental results of the effects of Hungarian climatic conditions to German disease-resistant industrial apple varieties
Published March 16, 2004
53-56.

In the recent years, several disease-resistant apple varieties appeared through the modern breeding technologies. These varieties can be grown with low usage of pesticides, which mean not only environment friendly fruit growing, but the production costs are also lower. In Eastern-Hungary — it is one of the main apple growing regions — a new... apple growing structure started to form by the investment of the German Wink Ltd. — several resistant apple varieties were brought from Germany. 'Resistant' refers genetic resistance that usually transferred from the genome of wild apple species. But the fruit of these apple species is not only resistant to diseases, but its quality is poorer, too. In Germany the Re-apples are grown only for the processing industry. Due to climatic circumstances in Eastern Hungary, the first experiences showed better parameters during laboratory measurement, the fruits have more beautiful view, shape and inner characters than usual industrial apples.

In our paper we discuss the results of sensory (consumer) tests, carried out in Eastern Hungary and in the Budapest-region the data analysis of systematic storing experiments (refraction, flesh firmness, weight loss, etc.) and profile analysis of fresh and stored Re-apples. (In the profile analysis the ProfiSens software [4,5] has been used.)

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Extending the vase life of Solidago canadensis cut flowers by using different chemical treatments
Published June 24, 2003
83-86.

In order to increase the vase life as well as quality of leaves of goldenrod (Solidago canadesis), the effect of 8-hydroxyquinoline sulphate (8-HQS), silver thiosulphate (STS) and l-methylcyclopropene (l-MCP) were investigated. 8-HQS was used as a continuous treatment at 400 ppm with or without sucrose at 50 g/l. The treatment of STS w...as used by putting the flower bases at 0.4 mM for 6h with or without sucrose at 50 g/l. l -MCP was used at 0.5 g/m3 for 6h dry or in water. Except the treatment of l -MCP in water, the chemical treatments, which were used, led to the increase vase of life of leaves as well as to the inflorescence of cut solidago spikes compared to the control. The best treatment in this concern was 8-HQS at 400 ppm without sucrose, which resulted in longest vase life of leaves as well as inflorescences and lowest percent loss of fresh weight of initial.

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