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How to produce large sized microtubers of potato cv. Desiree
Published October 16, 2002
33-36.

In vitro tuberization was induced on explants with different number of nodes layered on a medium with high sucrose (8%) content: 30, 15, 10, 7 and 6 explants per jar were cultured containing 1, 2, 3, 4 or 5 nodes, respectively. Microtubers developed were graded by their smallest diameter, and the number of tubers per jar, thei...r size distribution, their fresh weight and the multiplication rate were recorded. The highest multiplication rate (1.98) was obtained for explants with 5 nodes. The size distribution of tubers was markedly affected by treatments. The majority of microtubers (49.4%) were 6-8 mm in the case of the smallest explants (with I node). When explants with 2 to 5 nodes were used, the most microtubers were 8-10 mm but with an increase of explant size, more and more microtubers were produced with larger diameter up to 16 mm and average fresh weight of tubers also increased with the increase of explant size. For the microtuber production of Desiree the use of explants with two nodes can be suggested because in this treatment the average fresh weight of microtubers was high enough (250 mg) and the number of large sized microtubers was very high (79% was larger than 6 mm and 53% was larger than 8 mm).

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High-velocity microprojectile mediated DNA delivery into Phaseolus vulgaris callus cells
Published August 23, 2000
99-102.

We report the method for the establishment of rapidly growing callus cultures of Phaseolus vulgaris and the conditions required for efficient transformation using high velocity microprojectiles and high level of transient gene expression. Using hypocotyl explant and vertical culture on B5 medium with lmg/1 kinetin and 2 mg/1 2,4-D, we can recom...mend to get a rapidly growing callus from bean which is a good starting material to introduce foreign DNA into bean cells. The GeneBooster particle delivery system was used for the bombardment of bean callus and the Hgm resistance gene (Hgmr) was used as a selectable marker gene. 25mg/I hygromycin (Hgm) concentration was sufficient to kill the control callus. We used the standard physical factors, the appropriate pressure of N2 gas for the bombardment of the callus tissue, the shooting distance and the size of tungsten particles used as microprojectiles. Selective and nonselective tests were made by transferring the healthy green and white calluses, subcultured for 4 months on selective and nonselective medium. Several Hgm resistant calli had been obtained. Selective pressure was maintained over a period of 10 months.

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Effects of tuberization conditions on the microtuber yield and on the proportion of microtuber tissues
Published November 15, 2004
91-96.

The production facilities of large-sized microtubers in three potato varieties (cv. Desiree, BorO, Gfilbaba) and the effects of the applied tuberization conditions on the proportion of microtuber tissues, especially on the perimedullary region were investigated in present work. In vitro tuberization was induced on explants wit...h 2 or 5 nodes layered on MS medium supplemented with 8% sucrose. Induced cultures were exposed to short days (8 h) for 2 weeks, then to total darkness for further 11 weeks. For volume calculations of different tissue regions, the formula for ellipsoids (V=4/37c1/8/w2) was used. The number of large-size tubers (> 8 mm, up to 16 mm) reached 53%, 59% and 44% in cvs. Desiree, Giilbaba and Bore, respectively, which indicate that the size of microtubers could be increased by appropriate sucrose support and explant type. Microtubers produced on hormone-free medium have well-developed perimedullary region, and its volume rate seemed to be important in the final size of tubers. The increase in the rate of volume of the perimedulla was connected to the increase of tuber size until tubers reached 12 mm diameter. In microtubers larger than 12 mm in diameter, the volume rate of the pith was increased.

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Aminoglycoside antibiotics affect the in vitro morphogenic response of chrysanthemum and tobacco
Published August 14, 2002
93-104.

Broadly the success of genetic transformation of plants requires non-chimeric selection of transformed tissues and its subsequent regeneration. With rare exceptions, most plant transformation protocols still heavily utilize antibiotics for the selection of transgenic cells containing an antibiotic-degrading selectable marker gene. The morphogen...ic capacity of in vitro chrysanthemum and tobacco stem and leaf explants change with the addition of aminoglycoside antibiotics (AAs). Of 6 antibiotics tested, phytotoxicity occurred at 10-25 and 50-100 pgml-I in chrysanthemum and tobacco explants, respectively, depending on the size of the explant and the timing of application. The presence of light or darkness also had a significant effect. The use of transverse thin cell layers (tTCLs) in conjunction with high initial AA selection levels supported the greatest regeneration of transgenic material (adventitious shoots or callus) and the lowest number of escapes. Flow cytometric analyses demonstrate that regeneration can be predicted in both species, depending on the ploidy level of the callus. Endoreduplication was not observed in chrysanthemum, even at high AA levels, but occurred (8C or more) in tobacco callus, even at low AA concentrations (5-10 pgml-1). The higher the AA level, the greater the DNA degradation and the lower the 2C and 4C values.

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