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The effect of rootstock on the tree size of apricot cultivars
Published August 13, 2004
57-58.

The apricot is propagated on several kinds of rootstocks in Hungary. The main aspects of selecting rootstocks are as follows: adaptability to environmental circumstances, primarily soil conditions, ensuring the tree size that complies with the cultivation method, and compatibility with the grafted cultivar. At advanced, intensive orchards roots...tocks ensuring smaller tree size are privileged. For the establishment of the appropriate cultivation system, it is important to be aware of the expected growing vigour and tree size of certain cultivar­rootstock combinations when the orchard is designed. In the course of our experiment the size of 15-year-old trees of 4 apricot cultivars were examined on several rootstocks at an orchard in Siófok. On the basis of the data measured for each cultivar-rootstock combination, it can be stated that trees on wild apricot (P. armeniaca) rootstocks are the largest in size. Trees on prune (P. domestica) rootstock have 10-15% smaller crown volume than the previous combination. Trees on bullace (P. insititia) rootstock have the smallest tree size and their crown volume is 30-50% smaller than that of the trees on P. armeniaca rootstock. Thus, the application of prune and bullace rootstocks is beneficial at intensive apricot orchards as the size of trees can be reduced by their usage. However, their compatibility with the cultivars and their adaptability to the ecological conditions of the production site have to be tested before applying them widely. In the course of our research incompatibility was not experienced for any of the cultivar-rootstock combinations examined. Nevertheless, the drought tolerance of the rootstocks examined showed significant differences. Trees on P. domestica or P. insititia rootstock requires more water than those on P. armeniaca rootstock, therefore, they have to be irrigated.

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Evaluation of lifespan values of six tree taxa in city streets
Published June 10, 2018
25-27.

The aim of this study was to evaluate lifespan values of trees in tree-row system in the streets of Debrecen in two years (2009 and 2017). Six selected taxa (Pyrus calleryana, Acer tataricum, Sorbus intermedia, Magnolia kobus, Acer platanoides and Crataegus x lavalleei) were estimated for the following lifespan parameters: i) trunk diameter (cm...), ii) tree crown size (m), iii) trunk status (in 0-5 grades), iv) tree crown status (in 0-5 grades), and v) estimated tree viability (in 0-5 grades). Our results showed that the largest were achieved for Pyrus calleryana and the lowest for Acer tataricum. The largest tree crown diameters were achieved for Acer platanoides and the lowest Magnolia kobus. The best trunk statuses by 2017 were achieved for Pyrus calleryana and the worst Crataegus x lavalleei. The best tree crown statuses by 2017 were achieved for Pyrus calleryana and the worst for Acer tataricum. The best estimated tree viability status was achieved for two taxa (Pyrus calleryana and Acer platanoides). Overall tree values were 2.73 times higher in 2017 compared to 2009. In summary, this study demonstrated the role of appropriate choice of tree taxa for a tree-row system under city street conditions.

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The impact of location, row direction, plant density and rootstock on the sunburn damage of apple cultivars
Published March 14, 2005
19-30.

The effect of row direction (N-S, E-W), plant density (conventional and intensive) and rootstock (M9, MM106 and crab apple) on the sensitivity of 41 apple cultivars to sunburn injury was studied at 6 locations (Derecske, Kálmánáaza, Nagykutas, Nagylapos, Siófok, Tornyospálca).

During the observations the cultivars had rootstock-spe...cific properties in respect of sunburn-susceptibility. Accordingly, the injury was decreased in the order: M9, MM106 and seedling rootstocks. The differences in sensitivity depend on the canopy of trees, caused finally by the growing vigour of rootstocks. Accordingly, the highest value of sunburn injury was observed on M9 rootstock, because this rootstock has a dwarfing effect upon the scion cultivars. Thus, vegetative area of these trees grow very slowly and the foliage is not enough compact to protect the fruit from solar radiation. The size and density of the foliage increased in the order: M9, MM 106 and crab apple seedling as rootstock. Moreover, relationships were demonstrated between the diameter of upper part of the crown, the leaf area, the number of fruits per tree and the injury of sunburn.

Authors categorized the cultivars in respect of values of sunburn incidence: 1. „Not sensitive", II. „Moderately sensitive" and HI. „Strongly sensitive" categories were constituted. Generally, Topaz and Gala cultivars showed low damage (or were free from symptoms), in contrast to this, Golden mutants suffered relatively much. The most sensitive cultivar was Jonica on all the three rootstocks. We searched for relationship between the fruit quality parameters and the frequency of sunburn. Significant correlation was found in the cases of fruit size and the extent of cover-colour. The latter is interpreted with the fact that the best coloured fruits are found on the periphery of crown as a consequence of more intense irradiation.

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Production technology and fruit tree nutrition
Published June 24, 2003
39-42.

Fruit yield quality and quantity are effectively enhanced if healthy vegetative conditions are ensured. These optimal conditions — i.e. the balance between shoot development and yield — can be achieved by the rationalization of the production technologies, such as:

  • reduction of the size of the crown
  • adaptation of th...e severity and method of pruning to the conditions of the actual year
  • removal of the shoot tips
  • timely fruit thinning

By establishing an improved level of plant nutrient uptake, this will ensure a healthy balance between shoot growth and yield.

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The size of the canopy of sour cherry trees depends on the time of pruning
Published June 20, 2006
49-52.

The intensive culture of sour cherry is achieved by training of trees to form smaller canopies not by means of dwarfing rootstocks but by growth moderation techniques. The rootstocks traditionally used cause vigorous growth, and it is up to the technology to apply procedures less utilised earlier for that purpose. One of those techniques is the... transfer of hibernal pruning to the estival period. The best term of the latter is the period of 1-3 weeks after fruit harvest.

The prolongation of the period of favourable illumination and the reduction of the canopy size facilitate higher densities of planting (number of trees per hectare) and a better exploitation of the crown (specific yield). The regular use of summer pruning resulted also in a better quality of fruit.

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